Worksite Health PromotionWorksite Health Promotion



This is followed by a discussion of the economic forces that make implementing worksite health programs so advantageous for employers.

Author: David H. Chenoweth

Publisher: Human Kinetics

ISBN: 9781492583400

Category:

Page: 248

View: 302

In today’s difficult economic environment, worksite health promotion programs are becoming increasingly important as employers look for ways to contain health care costs and improve productivity. The newly updated Worksite HealthPromotion, ThirdEdition, presents students and professionals with all of the information they need to create programs that address these issues, improving both the physical health of the employees and the financial health of the organization. Based on Dr. Chenoweth’s expertise as a professor and a professional consultant, the text combines theoretical principles and research with practical applications and real-world examples to give readers a comprehensive and immediately useable introduction to the field. The text begins with an overview of worksite health promotion that illustrates the importance of these programs in today’s workplace. This is followed by a discussion of the economic forces that make implementing worksite health programs so advantageous for employers. The text’s clear presentation of program benefits highlighted in economic-based evaluations will prepare readers to make a case for their own interventions. Worksite Health Promotion, Third Edition, provides a step-by-step approach to planning, implementing, and evaluating programs. Readers will explore key topics such as assessing employees’ needs, setting appropriate goals, gaining management buy-in, budgeting, and program evaluation. They will also find full coverage of programming issues, including strategies for developing programs for healthy lifestyles, medical self-care, and disability management. The specific challenges of programming for small businesses and multisite workplaces are also addressed. The third edition has been fully revised with an improved organization and updated charts, tables, and references as well as the following additions that reflect the latest research and trends in the field: •Updated information on ADA, HIPAA, and GINA standards as they relate to worksite health promotion that will help readers better understand the implications of the legislation for their own businesses •New sections on health management, health coaching, budget development options, and present value adjustment •More information on integrated health data management systems, e-health technology, nutrition and weight control programs, fostering a healthy culture, and reducing stress in the workplace •Expanded coverage of program evaluation, including new sections on break-even analysis and determining present versus future value as well as improved illustrations of econometric-based evaluations and evaluation design •A larger focus on career development with updated information on certification options, intermediate-level practitioner competencies, and internship and job searches that will help students explore their professional options and prepare for their future in the field Improved textbook features make this leading text more classroom friendly than ever. Learning objectives, end-of-chapter overviews, and a new glossary of key terms will help students focus on the most important concepts in each chapter. Updated Looking Ahead and What Would You Do? sidebars will aid them in applying the information and can serve as the starting point for class discussions or assignments. A new instructor guide gives faculty great help in preparing for courses. It contains sample syllabi (including a syllabus for increasingly popular online offerings), a weekly instructional guide, and course outlines. Also new to this edition is an image bank with most of the art and tables from the text. Current practitioners looking for ideas and strategies for building a healthier workforce as well as students just beginning an exploration of the field can depend on Worksite Health Promotion, Third Edition, to inspire and inform. Both groups will find that this text offers the business knowledge, resources, and insights to guide them in this diverse and exciting career.

Worksite Health PromotionWorksite Health Promotion



Abstract: An annotated list of resources for worksite health assurance is arranged in 4 sections, and presented for individuals involved in the planning and initiating of health promotion and disease prevention programs.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015009876031

Category:

Page: 24

View: 859

Abstract: An annotated list of resources for worksite health assurance is arranged in 4 sections, and presented for individuals involved in the planning and initiating of health promotion and disease prevention programs. The sections cover: general information (11 citations); specific areas of interest, such as alcohol and drug abuse, cancer, fitness, hypertension control (23 citations); health newsletters for distribution to worksite health promotion program employees (7 citations); and general health promotion publications that warrant special consideration by worksite program individuals (7 citations). A separate section lists addresses of organizations and agencies offering additional information or services useful in developing health promotion worksite programs. (wz).

ACSM s Worksite Health Promotion ManualACSM s Worksite Health Promotion Manual



Helps readers to define, create, and implement worksite programs designed to improve employee health and wellness, and examines case studies of successful promotions.

Author: American College of Sports Medicine

Publisher: Human Kinetics 1

ISBN: 0736046577

Category:

Page: 250

View: 171

Helps readers to define, create, and implement worksite programs designed to improve employee health and wellness, and examines case studies of successful promotions.

Worksite Health Promotion EconomicsWorksite Health Promotion Economics



This text is an analysis of the effectiveness of worksite health promotion programmes.

Author: Robert L. Kaman

Publisher: Human Kinetics Publishers

ISBN: UOM:49015002198779

Category:

Page: 238

View: 370

This text is an analysis of the effectiveness of worksite health promotion programmes. It aims to provide professionals, students and researchers with ways to measure the effectiveness of a worksite health promotion programme, and presents the current state of research in the industry.

Managing Healthy OrganizationsManaging Healthy Organizations



Through a focused appraisal of this central albeit neglected occupational group in management studies, this book tries to explore and understand in some depth situations and experiences that are of general interest and concern in our ...

Author: Mikael Holmqvist

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136929854

Category:

Page: 182

View: 804

During the past two decades, corporate management has come to take an active role in health promotion programming for employees, offering health education, screenings, therapy, and even leisure initiatives. However, little attention has been given to how contemporary worksite health programs in fact blur the traditional distinction between work and private life. This has resulted in that little research on the other side of the work-health nexus: how employers factor health considerations into workforce management and productivity control. With the advancement of "work-site health promotion" in contemporary organizations, Holmqvist and Maravelias argue that this narrow focus, and the typical uncritical standpoint towards initiatives which are taken in the name of employees’ health, is inadequate. At a more fundamental level, the advancement of work-site health promotion may be a sign of a new or altered corporate health ethic: in contrast to the old corporate health ethic that was narrow and specific to the workplace, the new corporate health ethic appears to judge the ‘whole employee’ and especially what the whole employee may become; the risks one faces and the abilities one has to shoulder the responsibility for developing into a real corporate value. The authors suggest that health experts’ work is closely aligned with problems relating to the general management of organizations. Through a focused appraisal of this central albeit neglected occupational group in management studies, this book tries to explore and understand in some depth situations and experiences that are of general interest and concern in our society.

Evaluating Worksite Health PromotionEvaluating Worksite Health Promotion



A practical framework for evaluating health promotion in a variety of organizational settings. The text lays a theoretical foundation, then builds on it with practical applications for containing costs and improving the power of programmes.

Author: David H. Chenoweth

Publisher: Human Kinetics Publishers

ISBN: 0736036474

Category:

Page: 205

View: 799

A practical framework for evaluating health promotion in a variety of organizational settings. The text lays a theoretical foundation, then builds on it with practical applications for containing costs and improving the power of programmes. There are more than 19 case studies.

Intention to Participate in Worksite Health Promotion Programs with Different Program FeaturesIntention to Participate in Worksite Health Promotion Programs with Different Program Features



As the workforce ages and occupational sitting increases, more employees are at risk of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

Author: Lu Meng

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1035419516

Category:

Page: 282

View: 833

As the workforce ages and occupational sitting increases, more employees are at risk of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. Rising employee health problems lead to increasing health care costs and indirect costs due to work productivity loss. Multifaceted health promotion interventions are being adopted in the workplace for health promotion and disease prevention. Three main factors identified in previous literature to be associated with worksite health program success were employee-level characteristics, organizational characteristics, and program characteristics. The goal of the present study is to investigate how employee- and worksite-level characteristics affect employees' desired features of worksite health promotion programs. Cross-sectional online surveys were distributed through Amazon Mechanical Turk. Four hundred full-time employed U.S. Mturk users completed the survey and received a $2 incentive. Data were collected on their intention to participate in different types of programs, employee- and worksite-level characteristics such as worksite social support, work autonomy, physical effort at work, and perceived benefits of worksite health promotion. The findings of study 1 identified co-worker support, work autonomy, physical effort at work, and gender to be common or distinct factors associated with intention to participate in three types of worksite physical activity programs. The findings of study 2 identified supervisor support, perceived benefits of worksite health promotion, and perceived importance of learning health information to be associated with interest in different worksite health topics and intention to participate in two types of conversation-based programs (group discussion and individual consultation). Results also suggested the importance of confidentiality of employees' health information, and choosing the optimal conversation-based format for delivering sensitive health topics at worksites. These studies highlighted tailorable strategies for introducing interventions into worksites based on employee and workplace characteristics.

Global Perspectives in Workplace Health PromotionGlobal Perspectives in Workplace Health Promotion



The book focuses on several key areas regarding workplace health promotion: prevailing health issues and risk behaviors, existing healthcare systems, historical and cultural influences on both physical and mental health, key drivers for ...

Author: Wolf Kirsten

Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Publishers

ISBN: 9780763793579

Category:

Page: 493

View: 430

Health Sciences & Professions

Health Promotion in the WorkplaceHealth Promotion in the Workplace



Written from a scholarly perspective reflecting the full knowledge of science in the field, this comprehensive text recognizes the constraints of practical application facing businesses today.

Author: Michael Patterson O'Donnell

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 0766828662

Category:

Page: 614

View: 682

Health Promotion in the Workplace is an ideal reference for managers and consultants involved in the developing and implementation of health promotion programs. Written from a scholarly perspective reflecting the full knowledge of science in the field, this comprehensive text recognizes the constraints of practical application facing businesses today. Topics covered include the importance of health promotion programs; the process of designing, managing and evaluating programs; the positive effects such programs can have on employees and the workplace; the physical and emotional services these programs can offer; and major issues, such as factors affecting older workers and retirees and the emerging global perspective, impacting the health promotion field. · Financial analysis of health promotion programs provide necessary justification needed to secure funding · Chapters provide review of subject area, a discussion and critique of the supporting research and guidelines on how to implement the research into practice · Includes in depth guidelines for evaluating health promotion programs · Also ideal text for students in undergraduate and graduate level health promotion programs

Healthy Worksites Directory of Federal Initiatives in Worksite Health PromotionHealthy Worksites Directory of Federal Initiatives in Worksite Health Promotion



DIRECTORY OF FEDERAL WORKSITE HEALTH PROMOTION INITIATIVES
Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Public Health Service OFFICE
OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HEALTH ALCOHOL , DRUG ABUSE ,
AND ...

Author: United States. Public Health Service

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015022616075

Category:

Page: 24

View: 918

Worksite health presents a unique area of opportunity for targeted population health campaigns. The relationship between employment, health behavior, and healthcare coverage creates a unique situation within which to develop health promotion programming. With unemployment rates as of July 2019 nearing the lowest they have been in over a decade, and over half of American adults receiving healthcare coverage through their employer, the worksite is a logical target for health promotion efforts (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2019a; Fischer, Lang, Goetzel, Linnan, & Thorpe, 2018). Leveraging this scenario to improve employee health can also generate significant benefits for employers. However, in order to capitalize on this opportunity, worksite health programs must implement evidence-based strategies in an efficient and effective manner. In order to do this, it is important to evaluate and ensure that existing norms in the worksite health space are producing the desired results in an efficient manner.Worksite health programs have seen a steady increase in prevalence over the last decade. According to the RAND Employer Survey, as of 2012, 51% of employers with 50 or more employees offered some form of a wellness program, with larger businesses (greater than 100 employees) reporting significantly higher prevalence of programs (62% vs. 39%) (RAND Health, 2013). As of 2017, the percentage had risen to 81%, with employers investing an average $800 per employee annually for wellness programming (Emerman, 2017; Fischer et al., 2018). Among the leading health-related concerns for employers are absenteeism, presenteeism, and low-back pain among employees. The combined direct and indirect costs of such conditions take a significant financial and operational toll on industry. Worksite health professionals interested in generating both a humanistic and financial impact should be designing evidence-based programs aimed at improving these outcomes. However, some of the most popular components of worksite health promotion, such as on-site biometric screening, may not be generating the desired impact. Furthermore, as a greater percentage of occupations become sedentary, the impact of sedentary behavior and physical inactivity may be exacerbating these issues. Examining the relationship between these components and targeted areas of employer concern is essential in refining and enhancing future worksite health programming. Aim 1 of the present study examined the relationship between traditional worksite health assessment outcomes and employee performance. The relationships were examined among 48 participants (64.6% female). Participation was on a volunteer-basis, with participants receiving no incentives for enrolling in the study. Health assessments were conducted during a one-hour health assessment. Assessments included protocols commonly found in employee health assessments (e.g. biometric screening). Employee performance (e.g. presenteeism, absenteeism, low-back pain) was assessed via self-report questionnaire. Occupational sedentary behavior was assessed via direct accelerometry. Regarding outcomes of interest, presenteeism was found to be correlated with Pain Score (r = 0.-0.342, p = 0.031). Absenteeism showed significant correlation with Triglycerides (r = 0.378, p = 0.011), and Sedentary Time (r = 0.362, p = 0.020). In addition, there was a significant relationship between age and HDL levels (r = 0.303, p = 0.039), and age and fasted glucose (r = 0.451, p = 0.001). Significant differences were also found between sedentary and non-sedentary groups in regard to the relationship between HDL and absenteeism, as well as the relationship between low back pain and both total cholesterol and LDL. Changes in HDL explained 13.9% of the change in absenteeism F(1, 37) = 6.626, p = 0.014. Differences in TC explained 11.7% of pain variance, F(1, 37) = 5.724, p = 0.022. Differences in LDL explained 16.1% of the variance in pain F(1, 37) = 8.531, p = 0.006. Sedentary minutes at work was found to explain 13.1% of the variance in absenteeism F(1, 39) = 5.871, p = 0.020.Aim 2 of the present study examined the relationship between physical fitness and mobility assessment outcomes and employee performance, among the same sample. Participants were taken through a series of physical fitness-related assessments (e.g. handgrip dynamometry, functional movement screen, etc.), with employee performance (e.g. absenteeism, presenteeism, low-back pain) being assessed via self-report, and occupational sedentary behavior assessed via direct accelerometry. Participant age and sex was evaluated for potential impact on employee performance outcomes and occupational sedentary behavior. No significant relationships were identified relative to age and sex and employee performance outcomes, or occupational sedentary behavior. Age was found to solely correlate muscular strength (r = 0.443, p = 0.002) and overhead squat performance (r = -0.319, p = 0.029). Sex differences were identified only among three variables: aerobic capacity (2 (1) = 7.855, p = 0.005), body fat percentage (2 = 6.831, p = 0.009), and muscular strength (2 = 10.581, p = 0.001). The overhead squat mobility assessment identified significant differences between groups relative to Presenteeism (F(2, 42)=4.359, p=0.02, 2 = 0.187), and pain (F2, 42)=3.392, p=0.026, 2 = 0.064). A post-hoc Tukey analysis showed presenteeism was significantly lower (p = 0.038) among individuals scoring a 2 on the overhead squat compared to those scoring 3. Inversely, pain was significantly higher in those scoring 2, and lowest among participants scoring 3 on the overhead squat (p = 0.027).Aim 3 looked to provide a commentary on existing evidence and gaps care relative to employee health assessments and identify potential areas for improvement in addressing employee performance (e.g. absenteeism, presenteeism, and low-back pain). Existing literature on absenteeism, presenteeism, and low-back pain was examined alongside the results of Aim 1 and 2 to determine potential disconnects between worksite health program components and intended outcomes. Best practice suggestions were developed based upon these results. Overall, the present study generated several conclusions of use to worksite health professionals. Worksite health practitioners interested in maximizing impact on employee performance should be designing programs with evidence-based best-practices in mind. However, some of the most popular components of worksite health promotion, such as on-site biometric screening, may not be generating the desired impact. Given the existing literature, changes to worksite health promotion best practices could be implemented to better address the impact of absenteeism, presenteeism, and low-back pain on employee health and performance. Implementing programs designed to improve workplace culture and promote healthy lifestyle behavior, while encouraging employees to regularly engage with medical providers, may be the best use of employer resources to significantly impact and improve these outcomes.