Willa Cather in PersonWilla Cather in Person



This collection is valuable for anyone interested in the art of writing, in the genesis of the writer, or in the shape of American culture in the first decades of this century.

Author: Willa Cather

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803263260

Category:

Page: 202

View: 263

Cather, the Nebraska-born novelist, describes her childhood, her career as a writer, and the influences on her work

Edith Wharton Willa Cather and the Place of CultureEdith Wharton Willa Cather and the Place of Culture



Quoted in Bohlke, Willa Cather in Person, 70. Quoted in Bohlke, Willa ... Cather,
The Selected Letters of Willa Cather, 244; Wharton to Adele [Mrs. James A.]
Burden, October 15, 1917, mss 42, Box 64, ycal. Jewell, “Willa Cather's Shifting ...

Author: Julie Olin-Ammentorp

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9781496216908

Category:

Page: 396

View: 557

Edith Wharton and Willa Cather wrote many of the most enduring American novels from the first half of the twentieth century, including Wharton’s The House of Mirth, Ethan Frome, and The Age of Innocence, and Cather’s O Pioneers!, My Ántonia, and Death Comes for the Archbishop. Yet despite their perennial popularity and their status as major American novelists, Wharton (1862–1937) and Cather (1873–1947) have rarely been studied together. Indeed, critics and scholars seem to have conspired to keep them at a distance: Wharton is seen as “our literary aristocrat,” an author who chronicles the lives of the East Coast, Europe-bound elite, while Cather is considered a prairie populist who describes the lives of rugged western pioneers. These depictions, though partially valid, nonetheless rely on oversimplifications and neglect the striking and important ways the works of these two authors intersect. The first comparative study of Edith Wharton and Willa Cather in thirty years, this book combines biographical, historical, and literary analyses with a focus on place and aesthetics to reveal Wharton’s and Cather’s parallel experiences of dislocation, their relationship to each other as writers, and the profound similarities in their theories of fiction. Julie Olin-Ammentorp provides a new assessment of the affinities between Wharton and Cather by exploring the importance of literary and geographic place in their lives and works, including the role of New York City, the American West, France, and travel. In doing so she reveals the two authors’ shared concern about the culture of place and the place of culture in the United States.

Alexander s BridgeAlexander s Bridge



Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks.

Author: Willa Cather

Publisher: 1st World Publishing

ISBN: 1595406980

Category:

Page: 116

View: 795

Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - Late one brilliant April afternoon Professor Lucius Wilson stood at the head of Chestnut Street, looking about him with the pleased air of a man of taste who does not very often get to Boston. He had lived there as a student, but for twenty years and more, since he had been Professor of Philosophy in a Western university, he had seldom come East except to take a steamer for some foreign port. Wilson was standing quite still, contemplating with a whimsical smile the slanting street, with its worn paving, its irregular, gravely colored houses, and the row of naked trees on which the thin sunlight was still shining. The gleam of the river at the foot of the hill made him blink a little, not so much because it was too bright as because he found it so pleasant. The few passers-by glanced at him unconcernedly, and even the children who hurried along with their school-bags under their arms seemed to find it perfectly natural that a tall brown gentleman should be standing there, looking up through his glasses at the gray housetops.

Willa Cather s Canadian and Old World ConnectionsWilla Cather s Canadian and Old World Connections



U of Nebraska , 1993 . Ann Arbor : UMI . 9331413 Hinman , Eleanor . “ Willa
Cather , Famous Nebraska Novelist . ” Lincoln Sunday Star 6 Nov . 1921 . Rpt . in
Willa Cather in Person . Ed . L . Brent Bohlke . Lincoln : U of Nebraska P . 42 - 49
.

Author: Robert Thacker

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803263988

Category:

Page: 342

View: 629

Cather Studies 4 contains eighteen essays and elaborates a theme, ?Willa Cather?s Canadian and Old World Connections.? Such connections are central to Cather?s art and artistry. She transported much from the Old World to the New, shaping her antecedents to tell, in new ways, the stories of Nebraska, of the American Southwest, and especially of Quebec, in Shadows on the Rock. ø David Stouck details Cather?s numerous Canadian connections, Richard Millington treats her ?anthropological? re-creation of the cultural moment of seventeenth-century Quebec, and Franöois Palleau-Papin finds ?The Hidden French in Cather?s English.? A volume of lively and informed criticism, Cather Studies 4 vividly demonstrates Cather?s artistry and her work?s deep connections to the present cultural and critical moment.

A Calendar of the Letters of Willa CatherA Calendar of the Letters of Willa Cather



This book will be an essential resource for Cather scholars.

Author: Willa Cather

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 080324293X

Category:

Page: 334

View: 251

An infamous clause in Willa Cather's will, forbidding publication of her letters and other papers, has long caused consternation among Cather scholars. For Cather, a complex and private person who seldom made revelatory public pronouncements, personal letters provide-or would provide-an especially valuable key to understanding. But because of the terms of her will, that key is not readily available. Cather's letters will not come into public domain until the year 2017. Until then, even quotation, let alone publication in full, is prohibited. Janis P. Stout has gathered over eighteen hundred of Cather's letters--all the letters currently known to be available--and provides a brief summary of each, as well as a biographical directory identifying correspondents and a multisection index of the widely scattered letters organized by location, by correspondent, and by names and titles mentioned. This book will be an essential resource for Cather scholars.

Willa Cather s ModernismWilla Cather s Modernism



Willa Cather's Modernism challenges the assumption that Cather was an old-fashioned exponent of styles of fiction, demonstrating instead that Cather was clearly aware of the experimentation within the modernist movement.

Author: Jo Ann Middleton

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN: 0838633854

Category:

Page: 178

View: 515

Willa Cather's Modernism challenges the assumption that Cather was an old-fashioned exponent of styles of fiction, demonstrating instead that Cather was clearly aware of the experimentation within the modernist movement. Illustrative chapters deal with three central novels: A Lost Lady, The Professor's House, and My Mortal Enemy.

Sapphira and the Slave GirlSapphira and the Slave Girl



Tapping her earliest memories, Cather powerfully and sparely renders a Virginia world that is simultaneously beautiful and, as she said, “terrible.” The historical essay and explanatory notes explore the novel’s grounding in family, ...

Author: Willa Cather

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803214354

Category:

Page: 719

View: 583

Willa Cather’s twelfth and final novel, Sapphira and the Slave Girl, is her most intense fictional engagement with political and personal conflict. Set in Cather’s Virginia birthplace in 1856, the novel draws on family and local history and the escalating conflicts of the last years of slavery—conflicts in which Cather’s family members were deeply involved, both as slave owners and as opponents of slavery. Cather, at five years old, appears as a character in an unprecedented first-person epilogue. Tapping her earliest memories, Cather powerfully and sparely renders a Virginia world that is simultaneously beautiful and, as she said, “terrible.” The historical essay and explanatory notes explore the novel’s grounding in family, local, and national history; show how southern cultures continually shaped Cather’s life and work, culminating with this novel; and trace the progress of Cather’s research and composition during years of grief and loss that she described as the worst of her life. More early drafts, including manuscript fragments, are available for Sapphira and the Slave Girl than for any other Cather novel, and the revealing textual essay draws on this rich resource to provide new insights into Cather’s composition process.

Willa Cather s New YorkWilla Cather s New York



Like Cather , Bogan was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters . ...
Compare the verve and insight of the Bakst portrait Brent Bolke chose for the dust
jacket of Willa Cather in Person with the insipid but jaunty portrait of Cather by ...

Author: Merrill Maguire Skaggs

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015049970414

Category:

Page: 318

View: 570

She had been interested in medicine from her adolescence, as she continued to be until she died. That interest infuses her cityscapes from her earlier stories."--BOOK JACKET.

The Professor s House Publishing People SeriesThe Professor s House Publishing People Series



The moving was over and done.

Author: Willa Cather

Publisher:

ISBN: 9798698974772

Category:

Page: 425

View: 912

The moving was over and done. Professor St. Peter was alone in the dismantled house where he had lived ever since his marriage, where he had worked out his career and brought up his two daughters. It was almost as ugly as it is possible for a house to be; square, three stories in height, painted the colour of ashes--the front porch just too narrow for comfort, with a slanting floor and sagging steps. As he walked slowly about the empty, echoing rooms on that bright September morning, the Professor regarded thoughtfully the needless inconveniences he had put up with for so long; the stairs that were too steep, the halls that were too cramped, the awkward oak mantles with thick round posts crowned by bumptious wooden balls, over green-tiled fire-places.Certain wobbly stair treads, certain creaky boards in the upstairs hall, had made him wince many times a day for twenty-odd years--and they still creaked and wobbled. He had a deft hand with tools, he could easily have fixed them, but there were always so many things to fix, and there was not time enough to go round. He went into the kitchen, where he had carpentered under a succession of cooks, went up to the bath-room on the second floor, where there was only a painted tin tub; the taps were so old that no plumber could ever screw them tight enough to stop the drip, the window could only be coaxed up and down by wriggling, and the doors of the linen closet didn't fit. He had sympathized with his daughters' dissatisfaction, though he could never quite agree with them that the bath should be the most attractive room in the house. He had spent the happiest years of his youth in a house at Versailles where it distinctly was not, and he had known many charming people who had no bath at all. However, as his wife said: "If your country has contributed one thing, at least, to civilization, why not have it?" Many a night, after blowing out his study lamp, he had leaped into that tub, clad in his pyjamas, to give it another coat of some one of the many paints that were advertised to behave like porcelain, and didn't.The Professor in pyjamas was not an unpleasant sight; for looks, the fewer clothes he had on, the better. Anything that clung to his body showed it to be built upon extremely good bones, with the slender hips and springy shoulders of a tireless swimmer. Though he was born on Lake Michigan, of mixed stock (Canadian French on one side, and American farmers on the other), St. Peter was commonly said to look like a Spaniard. That was possibly because he had been in Spain a good deal, and was an authority on certain phases of Spanish history. He had a long brown face, with an oval chin over which he wore a close trimmed Van-Dyke, like a tuft of shiny black fur. With this silky, very black hair, he had a tawny skin with gold lights in it, a hawk nose, and hawk-like eyes--brown and gold and green. They were set in ample cavities, with plenty of room to move about, under thick, curly, black eyebrows that turned up sharply at the outer ends, like military moustaches. His wicked-looking eyebrows made his students call him Mephistopheles--and there was no evading the searching eyes underneath them; eyes that in a flash could pick out a friend or an unusual stranger from a throng. They had lost none of their fire, though just now the man behind them was feeling a diminution of ardour.

Willa Cather On WritingWilla Cather On Writing



"Whatever is felt upon the page without being specifically named there—that, one might say, is created." This famous observation appears inWilla Cather on Writing, a collection of essays and letters first published in 1949.

Author: Willa Cather

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 9780307831477

Category:

Page: 128

View: 348

"Whatever is felt upon the page without being specifically named there—that, one might say, is created." This famous observation appears inWilla Cather on Writing, a collection of essays and letters first published in 1949. In the course of it Cather writes, with grace and piercing clarity, about her own fiction and that of Sarah Orne Jewett, Stephen Crane, and Katherine Mansfield, among others. She concludes, "Art is a concrete and personal and rather childish thing after all—no matter what people do to graft it into science and make it sociological and psychological; it is no good at all unless it is let alone to be itself—a game of make-believe, of re-production, very exciting and delightful to people who have an ear for it or an eye for it."

Willa Cather RememberedWilla Cather Remembered



As a result , few people ever hear Cather's voice as a vibrant correspondent who
maintained a lively , continual conversation with people in letters when she could
not do so in person . The letters introduce us to a woman who wrote sparkling ...

Author: L. Brent Bohlke

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803223951

Category:

Page: 217

View: 633

The Willa Cather whom friends and acquaintances knew is not well known to contemporary readers. Bourgeois and midwestern, she was not a member of the Social Registerøsociety like Edith Wharton nor of the avant-garde or expatriate circles, as was Gertrude Stein, nor was she a member of the "lost generation" of the younger F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway. In the 1920s Cather turned fifty and was intent on fully developing her talent, writing six major novels during that decade. Willa Cather Remembered comprises reminiscences of the author written between the 1920s and 1980s by people ranging from close friends to journalistic observers and acquaintances. The materials are drawn from newspapers and journals, portions of books, and a few previously unpublished personal letters or reflections. Many of the writers knew Cather for many years; others knew her at a particular time and place, and a few only saw her in passing. Some are celebrities, such as Truman Capote; others are lesser-known but important names, such as Henry Seidel Canby, editor of the Saturday Review of Literature, and Fanny Butcher, editor of the Chicago Tribune book section. A few of the commentators, though they may have respected Cather in one way or another, are highly critical of her; others are unabashed admirers. All, however, present Cather as a memorable character with an unmistakable presence. These recollections by people who knew Cather throughout the course of her professional life will acquaint readers with the woman who incited one classmate at the University of Nebraska to say, "I don't know if I like Willie, but she's never dull."

Willa CatherWilla Cather



This book presents interprative approaches to Willa Cather based on materials available in the Drew University Cather Collection.

Author: John Joseph Murphy

Publisher: Associated University Presse

ISBN: 0838641350

Category:

Page: 345

View: 566

This book presents interprative approaches to Willa Cather based on materials available in the Drew University Cather Collection. The scholars suggest the work left to do on Willa Cather, and the diverse directions in which scholars now must travel.

Willa CatherWilla Cather



This is a work about the ways in which Willa Cather transforms secular space into sacred places in her fiction.

Author: Laura Winters

Publisher: Susquehanna University Press

ISBN: 0945636563

Category:

Page: 127

View: 125

This is a work about the ways in which Willa Cather transforms secular space into sacred places in her fiction. She uses landscape not merely as a backdrop against which her characters struggle, but as a character in and of itself - a dynamic presence. For her, landscape is like consciousness, surrounding us always. In her novels, Cather describes the ways in which places allow people to understand their authentic selves. Cather's characters are intricately connected to the places they inhabit. Bartley Alexander cannot be fully understood apart from the kind of bridges he constructs, nor Marian Forrester apart from her bedroom; nor Godfrey St. Peter apart from his houses; nor Myra Henshawe apart from the cliff to which she travels in order to die; nor Father Latour apart from the cathedral he builds and the cave he visits; nor Cecile and Euclide Auclair apart from their home nestled into the rock of Quebec. Each of these characters makes a place of exile his or her own. Cather's artistic voice speaks for and through the landscapes she loved in life. As several critics have noted, Cather's mind works by opposition, furiously spinning doubles of character, experience, temperament, and place. Locating the scenes she imagines in particular places, she forces her readers to merge character and place in a way no other American writer has ever done. Willa Cather's fiction is also suffused with the notion of exile. Her characters, often banished from a native or authentic landscape, are restless pilgrims who long for home - a comforting space, a rest from the arduous journey. In order to manage the condition of exile, Cather's characters must transform secular spaces into sacred places. In these sacred places, existence suddenly makes sense: order is created from chaos, as the history of the earth and the history of the individual merge and are reconciled. Indeed, these sacred places, with an aura of resolution and rightness in their very air, bring peace. In this volume, Laura Winters presents and explains the metaphors of cantilever and suspension in Cather's first novel, Alexander's Bridge. She addresses Cather's parable of inspiration lost and found in A Lost Lady. She also deals with the pervasiveness of possession in Cather's fiction - particularly with how this pervasiveness is worked out in relation to landscape in The Professor's House. Cather's description of death in exile as presented in My Mortal Enemy and her play with movement and stasis in Death Comes for the Archbishop are also treated. Finally Winters discusses the condition of exile in Shadows on the Rock.

Willa Cather at the Modernist CruxWilla Cather at the Modernist Crux



The Outlandish Hands of Fred Demmler: Pittsburgh Prototypes in The Professor's House -- 10. Translating the Southwest: The 1940 French Edition of Death Comes for the Archbishop -- Part 3. Articulation: The Song of the Lark -- 11.

Author: Cather Studies

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803296992

Category:

Page: 384

View: 391

Willa Cather at the Modernist Crux examines Willa Cather's position in time, in aesthetics, and in the world. Born a Victorian in 1873, Cather made herself a modernist through the poems, stories, and novels she wrote and published into the twentieth century. Beginning with a prologue locating Cather's position, this volume of Cather Studies offers three sets of related essays. The first section takes up Cather's beginnings with her late nineteenth-century cultural influences. The second section explores a range of discernible direct connections with contemporary artists (Howard Pyle, Frederic Remington, and Ernest Blumenschein) and others who figured in the making of her texts. The third section focuses on The Song of the Lark, a novel that confirms Cather's shift westward and elaborates her emergent modernism. An epilogue by the editors of The Selected Letters of Willa Cather addresses how the recent availability of these letters has transformed Cather studies. Altogether, these essays detail Cather's shaping of the world of the early twentieth century and later into a singular modernism born of both inherited and newer cultural traditions.

Violence the Arts and Willa CatherViolence the Arts and Willa Cather



Willa Cather was devoted to making art in the face of violence.

Author: Joseph R. Urgo

Publisher: Associated University Presse

ISBN: 0838641571

Category:

Page: 320

View: 809

Willa Cather was devoted to making art in the face of violence. Here, she emerges as a resource for survival in an age of terror, an artist who encourages her readers to feel at home in the nexus of creativity and terror, and to seek creative responses to the horror of human life.

Shadows on the Rock Publishing People SeriesShadows on the Rock Publishing People Series



One afternoon late in October of the year 1697, Euclide Auclair, the philosopher apothecary of Quebec, stood on the top of Cap Diamant gazing down the broad, empty river far beneath him.

Author: Willa Cather

Publisher:

ISBN: 9798699767052

Category:

Page: 479

View: 442

One afternoon late in October of the year 1697, Euclide Auclair, the philosopher apothecary of Quebec, stood on the top of Cap Diamant gazing down the broad, empty river far beneath him. Empty, because an hour ago the flash of retreating sails had disappeared behind the green island that splits the St. Lawrence below Quebec, and the last of the summer ships from France had started on her long voyage home.As long as La Bonne Espérance was still in sight, many of Auclair's friends and neighbours had kept him company on the hill-top; but when the last tip of white slid behind the curving shore, they went back to their shops and their kitchens to face the stern realities of life. Now for eight months the French colony on this rock in the North would be entirely cut off from Europe, from the world. This was October; not a sail would come up that wide waterway before next July. No supplies; not a cask of wine or a sack of flour, no gunpowder, or leather, or cloth, or iron tools. Not a letter, even--no news of what went on at home. There might be new wars, floods, conflagrations, epidemics, but the colonists would never know of them until next summer. People sometimes said that if King Louis died, the Minister would send word by the English ships that came to New York all winter, and the Dutch traders at Fort Orange would dispatch couriers to Montreal.The apothecary lingered on the hill-top long after his fellow townsmen had gone back to their affairs; for him this severance from the world grew every year harder to bear. It was a strange thing, indeed, that a man of his mild and thoughtful disposition, city-bred and most conventional in his habits, should be found on a grey rock in the Canadian wilderness. Cap Diamant, where he stood, was merely the highest ledge of that fortified cliff which was "Kebec,"--a triangular headland wedged in by the joining of two rivers, and girdled about by the greater river as by an encircling arm. Directly under his feet was the French stronghold,--scattered spires and slated roofs flashing in the rich, autumnal sunlight; the little capital which was just then the subject of so much discussion in Europe, and the goal of so many fantastic dreams.Auclair thought this rock-set town like nothing so much as one of those little artificial mountains which were made in the churches at home to present a theatric scene of the Nativity; cardboard mountains, broken up into cliffs and ledges and hollows to accommodate groups of figures on their way to the manger; angels and shepherds and horsemen and camels, set on peaks, sheltered in grottoes, clustered about the base.Divest your mind of Oriental colour, and you saw here very much such a mountain rock, cunningly built over with churches, convents, fortifications, gardens, following the natural irregularities of the headland on which they stood; some high, some low, some thrust up on a spur, some nestling in a hollow, some sprawling unevenly along a declivity.

The World of Willa CatherThe World of Willa Cather



It offers material that can be found nowhere else. Here are Willa Cather of Red Cloud, her family and friends, and the things that formed her sensibilities.

Author: Mildred R. Bennett

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803250134

Category:

Page: 285

View: 477

The World of Willa Cather describes the people and places in Nebraska that figure prominently in many of Cather’s best novels and short stories. It offers material that can be found nowhere else. Here are Willa Cather of Red Cloud, her family and friends, and the things that formed her sensibilities.

Willa Cather and the American SouthwestWilla Cather and the American Southwest



This volume focuses a sharp eye on how the landscape of the American Southwest served Cather creatively and the ways it shaped her research and productivity.

Author: John N. Swift

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 080329316X

Category:

Page: 172

View: 139

The American Southwest was arguably as formative a landscape for Willa Cather?s aesthetic vision as was her beloved Nebraska. Both landscapes elicited in her a sense of raw incompleteness. They seemed not so much finished places as things unassembled, more like countries ?still waiting to be made into [a] landscape.? Cather?s fascination with the Southwest led to its presence as a significant setting in three of her most ambitious novels: The Song of the Lark, The Professor?s House, and Death Comes for the Archbishop. This volume focuses a sharp eye on how the landscape of the American Southwest served Cather creatively and the ways it shaped her research and productivity. No single scholarly methodology prevails in the essays gathered here, giving the volume rare depth and complexity.

Willa Cather Pioneer Memorial NewsletterWilla Cather Pioneer Memorial Newsletter



Willa Cather Pioneer Memorial and Educational Foundation. charted , fired by the
dream of finally ... In Cather , people become defined as much by what they have
relinquished as by what they possess . In fact , I think that one of Cather ' s ...

Author: Willa Cather Pioneer Memorial and Educational Foundation

Publisher:

ISBN: IND:30000070264878

Category:

Page:

View: 109

Willa CatherWilla Cather



Traces the life of the American novelist from her childhood in the newly settled prairies of Nebraska through her years as a journalist, editor, and teacher, and examines the relationship between what she wrote and who she was

Author: Hermione Lee

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: UOM:39076001836654

Category:

Page: 410

View: 876

Traces the life of the American novelist from her childhood in the newly settled prairies of Nebraska through her years as a journalist, editor, and teacher, and examines the relationship between what she wrote and who she was