British Imperialism 1688 2000British Imperialism 1688 2000



A milestone in the understanding of British history and imperialism, this volume reinterprets the course of modern economic development and the causes of overseas expansion during the past three centuries.

Author: P. J. Cain

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN: 0582472865

Category:

Page: 739

View: 922

A milestone in the understanding of British history and imperialism, this volume reinterprets the course of modern economic development and the causes of overseas expansion during the past three centuries.

British ImperialismBritish Imperialism



A milestone in the understanding of British history and imperialism, this ground-breaking book radically reinterprets the course of modern economic development and the causes of overseas expansion during the past three centuries.

Author: P.J. Cain

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317389248

Category:

Page: 794

View: 948

A milestone in the understanding of British history and imperialism, this ground-breaking book radically reinterprets the course of modern economic development and the causes of overseas expansion during the past three centuries. Employing their concept of 'gentlemanly capitalism', the authors draw imperial and domestic British history together to show how the shape of the nation and its economy depended on international and imperial ties, and how these ties were undone to produce the post-colonial world of today. Containing a significantly expanded and updated Foreword and Afterword, this third edition assesses the development of the debate since the book’s original publication, discusses the imperial era in the context of the controversy over globalization, and shows how the study of the age of empires remains relevant to understanding the post-colonial world. Covering the full extent of the British empire from China to South America and taking a broad chronological view from the seventeenth century to post-imperial Britain today, British Imperialism: 1688–2015 is the perfect read for all students of imperial and global history.

The Twentieth CenturyThe Twentieth Century



The volume also explores the experience of 'imperial subjects' - in terms of culture, politics, and economics; an experience which culminated in the growth of vibrant, often new, national identities and movements and, ultimately, new nation ...

Author: William Roger Louis

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199246793

Category:

Page: 773

View: 605

The Oxford History of the British Empire is a major new assessment of the Empire in the light of recent scholarship and the progressive opening of historical records. From the founding of colonies in North America and the West Indies in the seventeenth century to the reversion of Hong Kong to China at the end of the twentieth, British imperialism was a catalyst for far-reaching change. The Oxford History of the British Empire as a comprehensive study allows us to understand the end of Empire in relation to its beginnings, the meaning of British imperialism for the ruled as well as the rulers, and the significance of the British Empire as a theme in world history. Volume IV considers many aspects of the 'imperial experience' in the final years of the British Empire, culminating in the mid-century's rapid processes of decolonization. It seeks to understand the men who managed the empire, their priorities and vision, and the mechanisms of control and connection which held theempire together. There are chapters on imperial centres, on the geographical 'periphery' of empire, and on all its connecting mechanisms, including institutions and the flow of people, money, goods, and services. The volume also explores the experience of 'imperial subjects' - in terms of culture, politics, and economics; an experience which culminated in the growth of vibrant, often new, national identities and movements and, ultimately, new nation-states. It concludes with the processes of decolonization which reshaped the political map of the late twentieth-century world.

The Oxford History of the British Empire Volume V HistoriographyThe Oxford History of the British Empire Volume V Historiography



The Oxford History of the British Empire is a major new assessment of the Empire in the light of recent scholarship and the progressive opening of historical records.

Author: Robin Winks

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 9780191647697

Category:

Page: 756

View: 190

The Oxford History of the British Empire is a major new assessment of the Empire in the light of recent scholarship and the progressive opening of historical records. From the founding of colonies in North America and the West Indies in the seventeenth century to the reversion of Hong Kong to China at the end of the twentieth, British imperialism was a catalyst for far-reaching change. The Oxford History of the British Empire as a comprehensive study helps us to understand the end of Empire in relation to its beginning, the meaning of British imperialism for the ruled as well as for the rulers, and the significance of the British Empire as a theme in world history. This fifth and final volume shows how opinions have changed dramatically over the generations about the nature, role, and value of imperialism generally, and the British Empire more specifically. The distinguished team of contributors discuss the many and diverse elements which have influenced writings on the Empire: the pressure of current events, access to primary sources, the creation of relevant university chairs, the rise of nationalism in former colonies, decolonization, and the Cold War. They demonstrate how the study of empire has evolved from a narrow focus on constitutional issues to a wide-ranging enquiry about international relations, the uses of power, and impacts and counterimpacts between settler groups and native peoples. The result is a thought-provoking cultural and intellectual inquiry into how we understand the past, and whether this understanding might affect the way we behave in the future.

The Oxford History of the British Empire Volume I The Origins of EmpireThe Oxford History of the British Empire Volume I The Origins of Empire



Volume I of The Oxford History of the British Empire explores the origins of empire.

Author: Nicholas Canny

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199246762

Category:

Page: 560

View: 911

The Oxford History of the British Empire is a major new assessment of the Empire in the light of recent scholarship and the progressive opening of historical records. Volume I explores the origins of empire. It shows how and why England, and later Britain, became involved with transoceanic navigation, trade, and settlement during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Leading historians illustrate the interconnections between developments in Europe and overseas and offer specialist studies on every part of the world that was substantially affected by British colonial activity.

The Decline and Fall of the British Empire 1781 1997The Decline and Fall of the British Empire 1781 1997



From the Hardcover edition.“A masterpiece of historical narrative.”–Literary Review “The conquest of one quarter of the world’s surface was, as Piers Brendon shows in disturbingly entertaining fashion, a story of massacre, famine, ...

Author: Piers Brendon

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9780712668460

Category:

Page: 793

View: 711

No empire has been larger or more diverse than the British Empire. At its apogee in the 1930s, 42 million Britons governed 500 million foreign subjects. Britannia ruled the waves and a quarter of the earth's surface was painted red on the map. Where Britain's writ did not run directly, its influence, sustained by matchless industrial and commercial sinews, was often paramount. Yet no empire (except the Russian) disappeared more swiftly. Within a generation this mighty structure sank almost without trace, leaving behind a scatter of sea-girt dependencies and a ghost of empire, the British Commonwealth of nations. Equally, it can be claimed that Britain bequeathed its former colonies economic foundations, a cultural legacy, a sporting spirit, a legal code and a language more ubiquitous than Latin ever was. In a book of unparalleled scholarship, Piers Brendon presents the story of the decline and eclipse of British might, the major historical event in the closing stages of the second millennium. Full of vivid particulars, brief lives, telling anecdotes, comic episodes, symbolic moments and illustrative vignettes, The Decline and Fall of the British Empire evokes remote places as well as distant times. From the war for American independence, the end of the Raj, the 'scram out of Africa' and the unfinished business of the Falklands and Hong Kong to the new 'informal' empire of the United States, this is a comprehensive and engaging account.

The Rise and Fall of the British EmpireThe Rise and Fall of the British Empire



Covers the history of the British Empire from 1600 to the present day, and its transition from ruler of half the world to its current status of isolated, economically fragile island.

Author: Lawrence James

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 031216985X

Category:

Page: 704

View: 264

Covers the history of the British Empire from 1600 to the present day, and its transition from ruler of half the world to its current status of isolated, economically fragile island.

Imperial citizenshipImperial citizenship



This is the first book-length study of the ideological foundations of British imperialism in the twentieth century.

Author: Daniel Gorman

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781847796776

Category:

Page: 256

View: 188

This is the first book-length study of the ideological foundations of British imperialism in the twentieth century. Drawing on the thinking of imperial activists, publicists, ideologues, and travelers such as Lionel Curtis, John Buchan, Arnold White, Richard Jebb and Thomas Sedgwick, this book offers a comparative history of how the idea of imperial citizenship took hold in early twentieth-century Britain, and how it helped foster the articulation of a broader British world. It reveals how imperial citizenship as a form of imperial identity was challenged by voices in both Britain and the empire, and how it influenced later imperial developments such as the immigration to Britain of ‘imperial citizens’ from the colonies after the Second World War. A work of political, intellectual and cultural history, the book re-incorporates the histories of the settlement colonies into imperial history, and suggests the importance of comparative history in understanding the imperial endeavour. It will be of interest to students of imperialism, British political and intellectual history, and of the various former dominions.

An Irish Empire An Irish Empire



Distributed in the US by St. Martin's Press. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Author: Keith Jeffery

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719038731

Category:

Page: 224

View: 528

Eight essays examine the experience and role of the Irish in the British empire during the 19th and 20th centuries, based on the understanding that, Ireland being less integrated, it differed from that of the other Celtic nations submerged in the United Kingdom. They discuss film, sport, India, the Irish military tradition, Irish unionists, Empire Day in Ireland from 1896 to 1962, Northern Irish businessmen, and Ulster resistance and loyalist rebellion. Distributed in the US by St. Martin's Press. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

British ImperialismBritish Imperialism



... The Empire Project: The Rise and Fall of the British World-System (Cambridge, 2009) that, citing British Imperialism, argues strongly for a renewed emphasis on the economic history of empire to an understanding the whole; ...

Author: P.J. Cain

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317389255

Category:

Page: 794

View: 730

A milestone in the understanding of British history and imperialism, this ground-breaking book radically reinterprets the course of modern economic development and the causes of overseas expansion during the past three centuries. Employing their concept of 'gentlemanly capitalism', the authors draw imperial and domestic British history together to show how the shape of the nation and its economy depended on international and imperial ties, and how these ties were undone to produce the post-colonial world of today. Containing a significantly expanded and updated Foreword and Afterword, this third edition assesses the development of the debate since the book’s original publication, discusses the imperial era in the context of the controversy over globalization, and shows how the study of the age of empires remains relevant to understanding the post-colonial world. Covering the full extent of the British empire from China to South America and taking a broad chronological view from the seventeenth century to post-imperial Britain today, British Imperialism: 1688–2015 is the perfect read for all students of imperial and global history.

European Women and the Second British EmpireEuropean Women and the Second British Empire



She also demonstrates that rewriting an imperial history that is sensitive to gender, culture, race, sexuality, and power is an exhilarating enterprise." —American Historical Review Based on the published accounts of travelers and ...

Author: Margaret Strobel

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253206316

Category:

Page: 108

View: 526

"It enhances our understanding of intracultural and cross-cultural relationships and raises significant questions about the complexities of the colonial phenomenon in the modern era." —Journal of World History "Provides a powerful and important analysis foregrounding the ideological construction of whiteness in understandings of gender and sexuality.... Margaret Strobel manages to provide a convincing analysis of the contradictory and often challenging space occupied by European women in the project of empire."Â —Signs "Strobel is to be highly commended for an historical analysis that brings critical light to bear on the complex interactions of gender, race, and class that have shadowed both European men's and women's participation in colonialism." —Women and Politics "... a clear exposition and synthesis... In this useful introduction to a new field, Strobel lays out clearly the arguments on which it is built. Her book makes it possible to acquaint students with the initial array of scholarship that is already growing. She also demonstrates that rewriting an imperial history that is sensitive to gender, culture, race, sexuality, and power is an exhilarating enterprise." —American Historical Review Based on the published accounts of travelers and officials' wives, biographies and other materials, this is a lively, fast-paced account of the roles of white women in the British empire, from about 1880 to the recent past. The European women of the second British empire carved out a space for themselves amid the options made available to them by British expansion, but they too were treated as inferiors—the inferior sex within the superior race.

An Era of Darkness The British Empire in IndiaAn Era of Darkness The British Empire in India



British imperialism justified itself as enlightened despotism for the benefit of the governed, but Shashi Tharoor takes on and demolishes this position, demonstrating how every supposed imperial 'gift' -- from the railways to the rule of ...

Author: Shashi Tharoor

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1079750366

Category:

Page:

View: 996

In the eighteenth century, India's share of the world economy was as large as Europe's. By 1947, after two centuries of British rule, it had decreased six-fold. Beyond conquest and deception, the Empire blew rebels from cannon, massacred unarmed protesters, entrenched institutionalised racism, and caused millions to die from starvation. British imperialism justified itself as enlightened despotism for the benefit of the governed, but Shashi Tharoor takes on and demolishes this position, demonstrating how every supposed imperial 'gift' -- from the railways to the rule of law - was designed in Britain's interests alone. He goes on to show how Britain's Industrial Revolution was founded on India's deindustrialisation, and the destruction of its textile industry. In this bold and incisive reassessment of colonialism, Tharoor exposes to devastating effect the inglorious reality of Britain's stained Indian legacy.

Empire as the Triumph of TheoryEmpire as the Triumph of Theory



A key addition to our understanding of the Victorian-era British Empire, this book looks at the founders of the Colonial Society and the ideas that led them down the path to imperialism.

Author: Edward Beasley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135767716

Category:

Page: 232

View: 391

Who were the first people to invent a world-historical mission for the British Empire? And what were the constituencies behind the development of the imperialistic thinking in mid-Victorian England? These questions are vital for understanding where the New Imperialism of the late nineteenth century came from. Empire as the Triumph of Theory takes as its sample the more than two hundred earliest members of the first major pro-imperial pressure group: the Colonial Society (founded in 1868, it is now the Royal Commonwealth Society). The book goes on to a careful and well-written tour of the different parts of the Victorian world, putting the founders of the Colonial society into their social contexts. Empire as the Triumph of Theory concludes that imperialism was developed less by investors and office holders than by people who, whatever their other activities, had written books or articles about the cultures of the world. Victorian activities around the globe were multitudinous and varied, and general ideas about England's imperial mission were, in fact, constructed by members of the Colonial Society, in order to make sense out of information flowing in from this teeming world. This is the first work to explore the social and intellectual origins of the Colonial Society. It brings the mid-Victorians to life, and should become a standard work for specialists on imperialism.

British ImperialismBritish Imperialism



What was British imperialism and was it an important element of modern globalization?

Author: Rob Johnson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781403940315

Category:

Page: 284

View: 698

What was British imperialism and was it an important element of modern globalization? Were economic, political or military factors paramount in imperial expansion? Do post-colonial theories assist or mislead historians? How have histories of imperialism changed, and are current analyses satisfactory? Robert Johnson's invaluable guide offers a succint, easy-to-follow introduction to the key issues and historiography of British imperialism from its origins to the conversion to the Commonwealth. British Imperialism - Provides concise introductions to key questions and debates - Takes a question-based approach to analysis of the material - Offers an assessment of the significance of economic, military and political factors in imperial expansion and decolonization - Presents critical appraisals of the most recent controversies including neo-colonialism, cultural imperialism, post-colonial theory, and gender and imperialism - Includes a useful guide to further reading Using vivid examples, Johnson clearly explains the nature of British imperialism and enables the reader to understand the causes, course and immediate consequences of the British-colonial encounter on a world-wide scale. His book is an essential starting point for all those new to the subject and a helpful introduction to more recent debates.

Imperialism and PostcolonialismImperialism and Postcolonialism



The book incorporates themes such as culture and national identity in Britain and the relationship between imperialism and modernity. Barbara Bush has taken up a remarkable challenge.

Author: Barbara Bush

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN: 0582505836

Category:

Page: 280

View: 937

"...essential introductory reading" - Times Higher Education Supplement Imperialism and Postcolonialism is a comprehensive look at the history of empire, from the Roman times to the present American empire. The book looks at changes in the way that imperialism has been understood and thought about. It compares empires and looks at the relationship between the history of empire and the histories of individual countries. The book incorporates themes such as culture and national identity in Britain and the relationship between imperialism and modernity.

Eco Cultural Networks and the British EmpireEco Cultural Networks and the British Empire



This book will be an important addition to the literature on British imperialism and global ecological change.

Author: James Beattie

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781441108678

Category:

Page: 288

View: 158

19th-century British imperial expansion dramatically shaped today's globalised world. Imperialism encouraged mass migrations of people, shifting flora, fauna and commodities around the world and led to a series of radical environmental changes never before experienced in history. Eco-Cultural Networks and the British Empire explores how these networks shaped ecosystems, cultures and societies throughout the British Empire and how they were themselves transformed by local and regional conditions. This multi-authored volume begins with a rigorous theoretical analysis of the categories of 'empire' and 'imperialism'. Its chapters, written by leading scholars in the field, draw methodologically from recent studies in environmental history, post-colonial theory and the history of science. Together, these perspectives provide a comprehensive historical understanding of how the British Empire reshaped the globe during the 19th and 20th centuries. This book will be an important addition to the literature on British imperialism and global ecological change.

British Empire Adventure StoriesBritish Empire Adventure Stories



He endures the Black Hole of Calcutta and bravely throws himself into the fray at Plessey. In the end, Charlie returns home to England a hero, and lives out his days regaling his children with the stories of the great Clive of India.

Author: Rudyard Kipling

Publisher: Prion Books

ISBN: 1853756601

Category:

Page: 774

View: 418

THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING - Rudyard Kipling's enthralling adventure follows two former soldiers who set out from British India to establish themselves as Kings in the mountain state of Kafiristan. They believe they can bring peace to a war-torn region and live a life of luxury, but not everything goes entirely to plan. KING SOLOMON'S MINES - Sir Henry Rider Haggard's story about three adventurers on the trail of the fabulous treasures of King Solomon's Mines trekking across deserts, climbing mountains, hacking their way through jungles and fighting for their lives in a tribal war along the way. WITH CLIVE IN INDIA - Charlie Marryat goes to India as a writer with the East India Company. After escaping privateers and pirates, he lands safely in Madras to begin his work. Charlie meets Robert Clive, survives the siege of Arcot, and helps a friendly state defend against French attacks. He endures the Black Hole of Calcutta and bravely throws himself into the fray at Plessey. In the end, Charlie returns home to England a hero, and lives out his days regaling his children with the stories of the great Clive of India.

Understanding the VictoriansUnderstanding the Victorians



... and conflicting interpretations ensure that we will never know precisely what the profits of empire were. ... (where the British had extensive interests but no formal control) in our attempts to understand the British empire.

Author: Susie Steinbach

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780415774086

Category:

Page: 278

View: 131

"The Victorian era was a time of dramatic change. During this period Britain ruled the largest empire on earth, witnessed the expansion of democracy, and developed universal education and mass print culture. Both its imperial might and the fact that it had industrialised and urbanised decades before any other nation allowed it to dominate world politics and culture in many ways for the better part of the nineteenth century. Understanding the Victorians paints a vivid portrait of the era, combines broad survey with close analysis, and introduces students to the critical debates taking place among historians today. It emphasises class, gender, and racial and imperial positioning as constitutive of human relations, including the social, economic, cultural, political, and legal. Starting with the Queen Caroline Affair in 1820 and coming right up to the start of World War I in 1914, Steinbach's thematic chapters take in, amongst other things, the economy, gender, religion, the history of science and ideas, material culture and sexuality. With a clear introduction outlining the key themes of the period, including the issue of periodization, and with chronologies and suggestions for further reading, this is the ideal companion for all students of the nineteenth century"--