This Hebrew LordThis Hebrew Lord



Candid, personal, and soundly argued, this is Spong's spiritual and intellectual pilgrimage to the Christ he discovered in Jesus of Nazareth.

Author: John Shelby Spong

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780061966019

Category:

Page: 208

View: 219

From the bestselling author of Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism: John Shelby Spong's original groundbreaking classic, now newly revised, reveals the Jesus "behind the language of myth, magic, and superstition." "In this study I found a Lord, a center for my being. Behind the supernatural framework of the first century . . . I discovered a life I wanted to know; a life that possessed a power I wanted to possess; a freedom, a wholeness for which I had yearned for years." Illuminating the "figure who stands at the center of all the Christina Church is," John Shelby Spong explores Jesus under the light of the Hebrew tradition into which he was born. Candid, personal, and soundly argued, this is Spong's spiritual and intellectual pilgrimage to the Christ he discovered in Jesus of Nazareth.

Tomorrow s GodTomorrow s God



To answer this question, Robert Goldman invites the reader on a carefully guided intellectual journey spanning centuries of theological, philosophical, and scientific thought, before arriving at his provocative conclusion.

Author: Robert N. Goldman

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781532674662

Category:

Page: 174

View: 252

What is the relationship between the Hebrew Bible and modern science? To answer this question, Robert Goldman invites the reader on a carefully guided intellectual journey spanning centuries of theological, philosophical, and scientific thought, before arriving at his provocative conclusion. He begins with the Hebrew Bible, examining the ancient concepts of "Olam" and "Yahweh," whose meanings are often lost in translation. Using these concepts as a lens, he explores Spinoza's "heretical" (at the time) theological views, probes Einstein's theory of space-time, and confronts formidable questions about human capacity for evil through the writings of Elie Wiesel and Etty Hillesum. Using simple, accessible language, Goldman ties together these diverse perspectives--as well as those of Plato, Maimonides, Godel, and others--and interweaves them with his own insights. Ultimately, he crafts a hopeful vision of a humankind and a God who are evolving toward one another, fueled by good actions, broader consciousness, and deeper human connection.

Tetragrammaton Western Christians and the Hebrew Name of GodTetragrammaton Western Christians and the Hebrew Name of God



Drawing on a detailed and sustained account of Christian reception of the Hebrew divine name until the Seventeenth Century this book illustrates its vitality in several periods as a stimulus to both orthodox and heterodox theologies and ...

Author: Robert J. Wilkinson

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004288171

Category:

Page: 600

View: 905

Drawing on a detailed and sustained account of Christian reception of the Hebrew divine name until the Seventeenth Century this book illustrates its vitality in several periods as a stimulus to both orthodox and heterodox theologies and imaginative structures

The Hebrew GodThe Hebrew God



Martin Luther When the prophet Jonah, on a ship in the Mediterranean, was
asked by his fellow travelers who he was, he answered: "I am a Hebrew. I
worship the Lord, the God of heaven, who made the sea and the dry land" (Jonah
1 :9).

Author: Bernhard Lang

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300090250

Category:

Page: 246

View: 257

Originally worshipped by the people of a small and politically insignificant eastern Mediterranean community, the Hebrew God rose to become the monotheistic deity of the entire Western tradition. Indeed, the God of Israel ranks as the most distinguished deity in human history. In this text, biblical scholar Bernhard Lang draws upon the available evidence, including ancient Near Eastern and Egyptian texts and art, to provide a portrait of the ancient Hebrew God.

A Prayer to Our FatherA Prayer to Our Father



DVD includes a dramatized reading of the Lord's Prayer in the original Hebrew by Keith Johnson, and original music video of the Lord's Prayer by Andrew Hodkinson, and an original music video of the Lord's Prayer by Phil Ohst.

Author: Nehemia Gordon

Publisher:

ISBN: 0976263742

Category:

Page: 174

View: 667

DVD includes a dramatized reading of the Lord's Prayer in the original Hebrew by Keith Johnson, and original music video of the Lord's Prayer by Andrew Hodkinson, and an original music video of the Lord's Prayer by Phil Ohst.

Jesus Rabbi and LordJesus Rabbi and Lord



The same was true of Matthew, wherever he was not copying Mark's Gospel.In 1962, Lindsey met Professor David Flusser of Hebrew University and the two pursued the question of whether we can get back to the earliest semitic story and words of ...

Author: Robert L. Lindsey

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1548824496

Category:

Page: 320

View: 857

In 1945, Robert Lisle Lindsey from Norman, Oklahoma, found himself the pastor of a small Baptist congregation in Jerusalem, Israel. With his Hebrew-speaking congregants in mind, he began a translation of the Greek texts of Matthew, Mark, and Luke and soon concluded there must lie behind these Gospels--even if distantly--an early Hebrew story of Jesus. To his surprise, he also found that Luke almost always showed Greek texts which could easily be translated literally to Hebrew. The same was true of Matthew, wherever he was not copying Mark's Gospel.In 1962, Lindsey met Professor David Flusser of Hebrew University and the two pursued the question of whether we can get back to the earliest semitic story and words of Jesus. "It is clear," say Lindsey and Flusser, "that our synoptic texts originated mainly in one Greek translation of a Hebrew biography of Jesus, probably written by the Matthew of tradition. The materials are too Hebraic to have originated in Greek, as many scholars mistakenly think today. Happily, if we use the right tools we can still hear Jesus speak as his fellow Jews of the first-century heard Him.''Lindsey tells here the warm, personal account of how he and Flusser struggled over many years to discover the earliest form of Jesus' words and narratives of His life. They believe that the records, when properly analyzed and studied, show us an authentic picture of Jesus interacting with the people of Jerusalem and Galilee. Jesus clearly heads a movement, the ''Kingdom of Heaven, '' and is a Divine Figure whose actions and words are fully Messianic.

Guide to the Names of GodGuide to the Names of God



In this book you will find out more about Who God is, What God does and want to do for you, and how much God desires for you to know Him more intimately and to experience the abundant life He has destined for you.

Author: Dianne Louise Myers Haneke, Ph.D.

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN: 1456717170

Category:

Page: 264

View: 641

Ever wondered, “Who in the world is God, anyway? I mean, what is He like? What are His characteristics? How can I get to know Him better?”Furthermore, “So what does all that have to do with me?” Ever asked yourself, “Why do some people pray’ in Jesus’ name, Amen!’” Yet, others pray using some of the names of God like El Shaddai, Adonai, LORD, Jehovah-Jireh, or Jehovah-Rophe?” Well, you have come to the right place for two reasons: 1) You are not alone in your queries; most people ask these questions at some time or another. 2) This volume is a brief guide to over 300 of the names of God as revealed in the Bible in various translations and versions. Each name’s page displays the name, its language derivative, the story behind its first usage, and other scriptures where it may be found. Part I presents five El- Hebrew names of God. Part II overviews eleven Yahweh and Jehovah- Hebrew names of God. Part III showcases other names of God revealed in the Old Testament. Part IV lists various names of God unveiled in the New Testament. In this book you will find out more about Who God is, What God does and want to do for you, and how much God desires for you to know Him more intimately and to experience the abundant life He has destined for you. So, are you ready to begin your adventure? Let’s do it!!

Origins of Our Faith the Hebrew Roots of ChristianityOrigins of Our Faith the Hebrew Roots of Christianity



God? Many Christians do not understand that the major difference between
Christian and Jew is not a question of WHO ... In his book This Hebrew Lord,
John Shelby Spong writes: The simplistic suggestion that Jesus is God is
nowhere made ...

Author: Rick Richardson

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN: 9781412214872

Category:

Page: 204

View: 461

Origins of Our Faith is an historic look back to the Hebrew roots of Christianity which propells the reader through a paradigm shift. Rick Richardson explains how and why a small group of Jewish "believers" were transformed into the most influential religious movement in history, and how returning to the origins of our faith is the only way for us to reach our destiny. Fascinating and important... You may not agree with all of Richardson's arguments and observations but they merit serious consideration. Michael Medved- Nationally syndicated talk show host.

God as an Absent Character in Biblical Hebrew NarrativeGod as an Absent Character in Biblical Hebrew Narrative



God as an Absent Character in Biblical Hebrew Narrative establishes a set of literary methods that both academic and non-academic readers can use to understand the character of God, who is the single most important character in Hebrew Bible ...

Author: Amelia Devin Freedman

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 0820478288

Category:

Page: 229

View: 779

Although the Hebrew Bible as a whole is centered on God and God's relations with Israel, the character of God appears in most biblical stories only indirectly. How are modern readers to make sense of this paradox? God as an Absent Character in Biblical Hebrew Narrative establishes a set of literary methods that both academic and non-academic readers can use to understand the character of God, who is the single most important character in Hebrew Bible narrative and, strangely, absent from the majority of it.

The Hebrew Names of GodThe Hebrew Names of God



Sing to God, chant hymns to His name extol Him who rides the clouds, the Lord (
Yah in the Hebrew text) is His name. The most well known occurrence of Yah in
the Bible is in the phrase Hallelujah meaning praise God. The last part is Yah ...

Author: Sipporah Y. Joseph

Publisher: Sipporah Y Joseph

ISBN: 9781449727192

Category:

Page: 104

View: 899

Join this journey through ancient biblical history about God's more than four hundred original names and titles. Learn the background, biblical context, and pronunciations in Hebrew. English translations are provided. Let "The Hebrew Names of God" be your guide on this historical path, and enrich your knowledge, understanding, and faith.

Names of GodNames of God



Knowing this is important because the names Jehovah, Jesus, Joshua etc .. would not be found spelled in such a fashion that uses the letter J. Therefore Jehovah could not be a name of the Most High used among the Israelites.

Author: Antonio Emmanuel

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1986951413

Category:

Page: 122

View: 920

Why is there so much confusion about the name of God? What is the true name of God anyway and does it matter to address God by that name? I choose to stick with what the scriptures say and use terms like God, Creator, Most High, Heavenly Father. confusion arises when people teach doctrines outside of what the scriptures speak or a lack of understanding. The True name of the Most High as rendered in english alphabetical characters is YHWH (He is or I Am ALL Self Existent or Eternal) . This name was replaced by the word LORD in our english translations. (see Strong's #3068) The four hebrew characters that make up the name is known as the Tetragrammaton which is Greek meaning "four letters." The four Hebrew characters (YHWH in english) that make up the name of the Most High cannot be disputed. The dispute comes with the pronunciation of the name. With this, many spell the name as they pronounce it. From YHWH various pronunciations have developed like YaHaWaH (Yaw-ha-wa), Yahweh (ya-way), Yahuwah (Ya-hoo-wa) and this is where the conflict arises. Lets go to the scriptures to get an understanding of how the scholars that put the Bible together understood how the name was to be rendered into English. Ex. 6:3 And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty, but by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them. We must understand that the letter J did not come to exist in the alphabet until after the King James bible was completed. If you examine a true 1611 KJV you will not find the letter J within words. Instead the letter I is used seeing there was no J used at the time of the translation. Knowing this is important because the names Jehovah, Jesus, Joshua etc .. would not be found spelled in such a fashion that uses the letter J. Therefore Jehovah could not be a name of the Most High used among the Israelites. But we do know the letter "J" was used to replace the hebrew "Y" character and the letter "V" replaced the hebrew "W." Now we can get a better understanding of how the name Jehovah was misrendered in english. In the hebrew alphabet there is no letter or character J, E, O, V, U, F therefore to correctly render "Jehovah" in english, it would be Yahawah or Yahuwah. (Some believe the "HA" character in the middle of the name gives a softer sound as Hu (hoo) than the sharp sounding "HA' therefore they spell it Ya-Hu-Wah but the hebrew name of the Most High is YHWH the four hebrew characters nontheless. Lets examine the Israelite historian Flavious Josephus' account of the name. Works of Josephus- Wars of he Jews, Book 5, Par 7 "A mitre also of fine linen encompassed his head, which was tied by a blue ribbon, about which there was another golden crown, in which was engraven the sacred name [of God]: it consists of four vowels. The four vowels mentioned are the four hebrew characters (hebrew vowels) that make up the name of YHWH that was engraved within the Levite Priest's mitre or turban. Ex 39:30-31 The name YHWH appears all throughout scripture but translated as LORD in the english translations (as supposed to keep the true name YHWH from being polluted or blasphemed) and was revealed to Moses after the Israelites left Egypt. Lets read again Ex. 6:3 And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty, but by my name JEHOVAH (YHWH) was I not known to them. The Most High clearly states that Abraham, Isaac and Jacob only knew him by "God Almighty" (al shadday) and not by his name YHWH, but they still feared and worshipped the Most High. This shows that if the Most High demands we address him by his name YHWH only would he not have revealed this to Abraham the Father of the covenant? Lets also examine. Ex. 2:23 ¶ And it came to pass in process of time, that the king of Egypt died: and the children of Israel sighed by reason of the bondage, and they cried, and their cry came up unto God by reason of the bondage.

Hebrew Life and LiteratureHebrew Life and Literature



As a sun - god , Shalem stood for order , regularity , and justice , and was
associated with the scribes and their ethos . ... population of the city and the
Hebrew newcomers , but also between Shalem and Yahweh , the Hebrew Lord
of War .

Author: Bernhard Lang

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 0754666182

Category:

Page: 278

View: 395

Bernhard Lang, known for his contributions over several decades to biblical anthropology, offers in this volume a selection of essays on the life and literature of the ancient Hebrews. The subjects range from the Hebrew God, the world-view of the Bible, and the formation of the scriptural canon, to peasant poverty, women's work, the good life, and prophetic street theatre. The stories of Joseph, Samson, and the expulsion from Paradise are told, and in a departure from the Old Testament, the priestly origins of the Eucharist are considered. Insight into the Hebrew mentality is facilitated by the arrangement of the essays, reflecting the three strata of the ancient society: the peasants, with their common concerns of fertility and happiness; warriors, their martial pursuits, and the divine Lord of War; and the wise - prophets, priests, and sages.

The Englishman s Hebrew and Chaldee Concordance of the Old Testament The Englishman s Hebrew and Chaldee Concordance of the Old Testament



Thus saith the Lord God Lord God ; Mic . 1 : 2 . let the Lord God be witness
against you , 22 : 12 , 31 . saith the Lord God . the Lord from his holy temple . 19 ,
28 . thus saith the Lord God ; Hab . 3 : 19 . The Lord God ( is ) my strength , 23 :
22 , 28 ...

Author: George V. Wigram

Publisher:

ISBN: OXFORD:600099121

Category:

Page: 1760

View: 444

God Wants It God Wants It



Examines three Jewish chronicles of the First Crusade: the Chronicle of Solomon ben Simson, the Chronicle of Eliezer ben R. Nathan, and the Anonymous Chronicle of Mainz, with the goal to analyze the ideology of martyrdom found in them and ...

Author: Lena Roos

Publisher: Brepols Pub

ISBN: STANFORD:36105114459493

Category:

Page: 294

View: 241

Examines three Jewish chronicles of the First Crusade: the Chronicle of Solomon ben Simson, the Chronicle of Eliezer ben R. Nathan, and the Anonymous Chronicle of Mainz, with the goal to analyze the ideology of martyrdom found in them and to trace its background. Notes the characteristic motifs in these chronicles: joy of martyrdom, heavenly reward to the martyrs, martyrdom as a decree of God, death of martyrs as a promise of the Messianic redemption, and the most unusual for the Jewish literature motif - active martyrdom. The communities suffered a disaster that surpassed all the previous outbursts of anti-Jewish violence in the region, and they wanted to come to terms with it and to infuse it with a meaning. Concludes that although some Biblical and midrashic motifs can be found in the chronicles, the ideology of martyrdom in them share many of its characteristics with the Christian contemporary counterparts. This fact may be attributed either to Christian influence or to a common contemporary European discourse of martyrdom. Notes that medieval Ashkenazic Jews were part of their non-Jewish surroundings in a greater degree than it has been supposed.

Jesus the Messiah in the Hebrew BibleJesus the Messiah in the Hebrew Bible



This is someone very close to God , depicted in the Hebrew text as God ' s fellow
man . Note that ... Melchizedek : Co - regent with God Ps 110 : 1 : Yahweh
whispered to my Lord , " Sit at my right hand until I make your enemies your
footstool .

Author: Eugen J. Pentiuc

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN: 0809143461

Category:

Page: 188

View: 451

JESUS THE MESSIAH IN THE HEBREW BIBLE deals with the messianic texts found in the Hebrew Bible. Shifting away from conventional paradigms, Eugen Pentiuc develops a new way of understanding the presence of Christ in the Old Testament. His approach is ontological, based on the view that Jesus the Messiah was pre-existent, and he appeared in manifold forms throughout the Hebrew Bible prior to his human incarnation in the New Testament. This book provides an accurate exegetical basis for reviewing the prophetic indicators--"as well as the literary explications--"of the relationship between the Old Testament prophecy and the New Testament fulfillment of Jesus the Messiah. Intended as primarily a pastoral work, based on theology and biblical exegesis, it contains' homelitic outlines and samples. Also included are the church Fathers' writings on the most important issues of hermeneutics. This book is a work of exegesis and biblical theology entwined with pastoral guidance. It will be a useful tool for both ministers and faithful in their quest of Christ in the Old Testament.

Prayer in the Hebrew BiblePrayer in the Hebrew Bible



Balentine invites the reader to consider several aspects of prayer in the Hebrew Bible: prayer and the depiction of character, prayer and the characterization of God, prayers for divine justice, the lament tradition, sensible praise, prayer ...

Author: Samuel Eugene Balentine

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN: 1451418078

Category:

Page: 311

View: 323

Balentine invites the reader to consider several aspects of prayer in the Hebrew Bible: prayer and the depiction of character, prayer and the characterization of God, prayers for divine justice, the lament tradition, sensible praise, prayer in Old Testament theology, and the motif of the church as "a house of prayer".