The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke Volume VII India The Hastings Trial 1789 1794The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke Volume VII India The Hastings Trial 1789 1794



This volume completes the widely acclaimed collection of Edmund Burke's Indian Writings and Speeches set within the series as a whole, as included in the two previous volumes V and VI. It provides a full exposition of Burke's views on India ...

Author: Edmund Burke

Publisher: Writings and Speeches of Edmun

ISBN: WISC:89071900013

Category:

Page: 744

View: 936

This volume completes the widely acclaimed collection of Edmund Burke's Indian Writings and Speeches set within the series as a whole, as included in the two previous volumes V and VI. It provides a full exposition of Burke's views on India, including speeches and a report made by Burke at the trial of Warren Hastings on an impeachment from 1789-1794. It contains much of Burke's thoughts on other issues, in particular his views on enforcing the rule of justice throughout the world.

The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke The French Revolution 1790 1794The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke The French Revolution 1790 1794



It closes with Burke's important and detailed summation of the prosecution's. However, this volume is not only a full exposition of Burke's views on India but contains much of great interest about other aspects of his thought.

Author: Edmund Burke

Publisher:

ISBN: UCSD:31822004974754

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Page:

View: 673

V. 1. Presents Burke's early literary writings up to 1765, and before he became a key political figure. It is the first fully annotated and critical edition, with comprehensive notes and an authoritative introduction. The writings published here introduce readers to Burke's early attempts at a public voice. v. 3. Continues the story of Burke, the Rockingham party of Whigs to which he adhered, and the American crisis. Burke had already established himself as a master of debate and an accomplished writer in the early 1770s; by the end of the decade he was recognized as one of the greatest parliamentarians of the age. v. 4. The fourth volume in the Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke series is also the last of the three Party and Parliament volumes, which follow Edmund Burke through from the opening of a newly elected Parliament which assembled on 31 October 1780 to his retirement from the Commons in 1794. This volume addresses Burke's views on the authority of Parliament over the British provinces in India, and his concerns about the implications of the French Revolution for British politics. He also expresses his views on issues that had always greatly interested him, such as the reform of criminal law, the confinement of debtors, and the abolition of what he regarded as outmoded economic regulations. The texts for the items, which have appeared in previous editions of Burke's Works, have been reconstructed, largely by the use of manuscripts, and many of the shorter speeches appear here in print for the first time. v. 5. A scholarly edition of the writings and speeches of Edmund Burke. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus. v. 6. Contains Burke's writings and speeches during two years in the House of Commons and the first session of the trial in the House of Lords. The volume covers the beginnings of the famous impeachment of Warren Hastins, which was to be one of Burke's major preoccupations for the rest of his life. The speeches convey Burke's vision of India and of imperial justice, as well as his moral and political thought as a whole on the eve of the French Revolution. v. 7. This key volume specifically completes the collection of Edmund Burke's Indian Writings and Speeches which is set within the series, and is both an exposition of Burke's views on India from his coverage of the Hastings trial, and his views on maintaining the rule of a universal justice. The texts for the items, which have appeared in previous editions of Burke's Works, have been reconstructed, largely by the use of manuscripts. Indeed many of the shorter speeches appear here in print for the first time. The volume includes a key speech which introduced one of the main charges in the trial of Warren Hastings on an impeachment from 1789-1794, and an important report on the conduct of the trial. It closes with Burke's important and detailed summation of the prosecution's. However, this volume is not only a full exposition of Burke's views on India but contains much of great interest about other aspects of his thought. In particular, Burke saw himself in these years as being engaged in a battle against the lawless disruption of society, both in Europe and in Asia, in order to maintain the rule of a universal justice, a main theme of this volume. v. 8. This is the first edition of Burke's famous Reflections on the Revolution in France to appear for twenty years. No edition of his other writings on the Revolution has appeared for almost a century. In these years, the background against which Burke wrote has been much studied, throwing new light on his motives for commentating on France, and the reasons why his writings were both widely read and widely rejected. Published two hundred years after the outbreak of the French Revolution, this edition shows that the issues raised by the most influential commentaries on that Revolution have yet to be resolved. v. 9. This collection of the writings and speeches of Burke include a critique of the French Revolution which expresses much of his matured thinking on political and social life and issued a call for a European crusade to save civilization; and his thoughts on Irish constitutional, economic, and religious problems and Anglo-Irish relations. -- Publisher.

The Writings and Speeches of Edmund BurkeThe Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke



A scholarly edition of the writings and speeches of Edmund Burke. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus. v. 6.

Author: Edmund Burke

Publisher:

ISBN: WISC:89056014137

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Page:

View: 855

V. 1. Presents Burke's early literary writings up to 1765, and before he became a key political figure. It is the first fully annotated and critical edition, with comprehensive notes and an authoritative introduction. The writings published here introduce readers to Burke's early attempts at a public voice. v. 3. Continues the story of Burke, the Rockingham party of Whigs to which he adhered, and the American crisis. Burke had already established himself as a master of debate and an accomplished writer in the early 1770s; by the end of the decade he was recognized as one of the greatest parliamentarians of the age. v. 4. The fourth volume in the Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke series is also the last of the three Party and Parliament volumes, which follow Edmund Burke through from the opening of a newly elected Parliament which assembled on 31 October 1780 to his retirement from the Commons in 1794. This volume addresses Burke's views on the authority of Parliament over the British provinces in India, and his concerns about the implications of the French Revolution for British politics. He also expresses his views on issues that had always greatly interested him, such as the reform of criminal law, the confinement of debtors, and the abolition of what he regarded as outmoded economic regulations. The texts for the items, which have appeared in previous editions of Burke's Works, have been reconstructed, largely by the use of manuscripts, and many of the shorter speeches appear here in print for the first time. v. 5. A scholarly edition of the writings and speeches of Edmund Burke. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus. v. 6. Contains Burke's writings and speeches during two years in the House of Commons and the first session of the trial in the House of Lords. The volume covers the beginnings of the famous impeachment of Warren Hastins, which was to be one of Burke's major preoccupations for the rest of his life. The speeches convey Burke's vision of India and of imperial justice, as well as his moral and political thought as a whole on the eve of the French Revolution. v. 7. This key volume specifically completes the collection of Edmund Burke's Indian Writings and Speeches which is set within the series, and is both an exposition of Burke's views on India from his coverage of the Hastings trial, and his views on maintaining the rule of a universal justice. The texts for the items, which have appeared in previous editions of Burke's Works, have been reconstructed, largely by the use of manuscripts. Indeed many of the shorter speeches appear here in print for the first time. The volume includes a key speech which introduced one of the main charges in the trial of Warren Hastings on an impeachment from 1789-1794, and an important report on the conduct of the trial. It closes with Burke's important and detailed summation of the prosecution's. However, this volume is not only a full exposition of Burke's views on India but contains much of great interest about other aspects of his thought. In particular, Burke saw himself in these years as being engaged in a battle against the lawless disruption of society, both in Europe and in Asia, in order to maintain the rule of a universal justice, a main theme of this volume. v. 8. This is the first edition of Burke's famous Reflections on the Revolution in France to appear for twenty years. No edition of his other writings on the Revolution has appeared for almost a century. In these years, the background against which Burke wrote has been much studied, throwing new light on his motives for commentating on France, and the reasons why his writings were both widely read and widely rejected. Published two hundred years after the outbreak of the French Revolution, this edition shows that the issues raised by the most influential commentaries on that Revolution have yet to be resolved. v. 9. This collection of the writings and speeches of Burke include a critique of the French Revolution which expresses much of his matured thinking on political and social life and issued a call for a European crusade to save civilization; and his thoughts on Irish constitutional, economic, and religious problems and Anglo-Irish relations. -- Publisher.

The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke India Madras and Bengal 1774 1785The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke India Madras and Bengal 1774 1785



It closes with Burke's important and detailed summation of the prosecution's. However, this volume is not only a full exposition of Burke's views on India but contains much of great interest about other aspects of his thought.

Author: Edmund Burke

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105010561350

Category:

Page: 667

View: 430

V. 1. Presents Burke's early literary writings up to 1765, and before he became a key political figure. It is the first fully annotated and critical edition, with comprehensive notes and an authoritative introduction. The writings published here introduce readers to Burke's early attempts at a public voice. v. 3. Continues the story of Burke, the Rockingham party of Whigs to which he adhered, and the American crisis. Burke had already established himself as a master of debate and an accomplished writer in the early 1770s; by the end of the decade he was recognized as one of the greatest parliamentarians of the age. v. 4. The fourth volume in the Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke series is also the last of the three Party and Parliament volumes, which follow Edmund Burke through from the opening of a newly elected Parliament which assembled on 31 October 1780 to his retirement from the Commons in 1794. This volume addresses Burke's views on the authority of Parliament over the British provinces in India, and his concerns about the implications of the French Revolution for British politics. He also expresses his views on issues that had always greatly interested him, such as the reform of criminal law, the confinement of debtors, and the abolition of what he regarded as outmoded economic regulations. The texts for the items, which have appeared in previous editions of Burke's Works, have been reconstructed, largely by the use of manuscripts, and many of the shorter speeches appear here in print for the first time. v. 5. A scholarly edition of the writings and speeches of Edmund Burke. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus. v. 6. Contains Burke's writings and speeches during two years in the House of Commons and the first session of the trial in the House of Lords. The volume covers the beginnings of the famous impeachment of Warren Hastins, which was to be one of Burke's major preoccupations for the rest of his life. The speeches convey Burke's vision of India and of imperial justice, as well as his moral and political thought as a whole on the eve of the French Revolution. v. 7. This key volume specifically completes the collection of Edmund Burke's Indian Writings and Speeches which is set within the series, and is both an exposition of Burke's views on India from his coverage of the Hastings trial, and his views on maintaining the rule of a universal justice. The texts for the items, which have appeared in previous editions of Burke's Works, have been reconstructed, largely by the use of manuscripts. Indeed many of the shorter speeches appear here in print for the first time. The volume includes a key speech which introduced one of the main charges in the trial of Warren Hastings on an impeachment from 1789-1794, and an important report on the conduct of the trial. It closes with Burke's important and detailed summation of the prosecution's. However, this volume is not only a full exposition of Burke's views on India but contains much of great interest about other aspects of his thought. In particular, Burke saw himself in these years as being engaged in a battle against the lawless disruption of society, both in Europe and in Asia, in order to maintain the rule of a universal justice, a main theme of this volume. v. 8. This is the first edition of Burke's famous Reflections on the Revolution in France to appear for twenty years. No edition of his other writings on the Revolution has appeared for almost a century. In these years, the background against which Burke wrote has been much studied, throwing new light on his motives for commentating on France, and the reasons why his writings were both widely read and widely rejected. Published two hundred years after the outbreak of the French Revolution, this edition shows that the issues raised by the most influential commentaries on that Revolution have yet to be resolved. v. 9. This collection of the writings and speeches of Burke include a critique of the French Revolution which expresses much of his matured thinking on political and social life and issued a call for a European crusade to save civilization; and his thoughts on Irish constitutional, economic, and religious problems and Anglo-Irish relations. -- Publisher.

The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke Party Parliament and the American crisis 1766 1774The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke Party Parliament and the American crisis 1766 1774



It closes with Burke's important and detailed summation of the prosecution's. However, this volume is not only a full exposition of Burke's views on India but contains much of great interest about other aspects of his thought.

Author: Edmund Burke

Publisher:

ISBN: WISC:89016502403

Category:

Page: 667

View: 832

V. 1. Presents Burke's early literary writings up to 1765, and before he became a key political figure. It is the first fully annotated and critical edition, with comprehensive notes and an authoritative introduction. The writings published here introduce readers to Burke's early attempts at a public voice. v. 3. Continues the story of Burke, the Rockingham party of Whigs to which he adhered, and the American crisis. Burke had already established himself as a master of debate and an accomplished writer in the early 1770s; by the end of the decade he was recognized as one of the greatest parliamentarians of the age. v. 4. The fourth volume in the Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke series is also the last of the three Party and Parliament volumes, which follow Edmund Burke through from the opening of a newly elected Parliament which assembled on 31 October 1780 to his retirement from the Commons in 1794. This volume addresses Burke's views on the authority of Parliament over the British provinces in India, and his concerns about the implications of the French Revolution for British politics. He also expresses his views on issues that had always greatly interested him, such as the reform of criminal law, the confinement of debtors, and the abolition of what he regarded as outmoded economic regulations. The texts for the items, which have appeared in previous editions of Burke's Works, have been reconstructed, largely by the use of manuscripts, and many of the shorter speeches appear here in print for the first time. v. 5. A scholarly edition of the writings and speeches of Edmund Burke. The edition presents an authoritative text, together with an introduction, commentary notes, and scholarly apparatus. v. 6. Contains Burke's writings and speeches during two years in the House of Commons and the first session of the trial in the House of Lords. The volume covers the beginnings of the famous impeachment of Warren Hastins, which was to be one of Burke's major preoccupations for the rest of his life. The speeches convey Burke's vision of India and of imperial justice, as well as his moral and political thought as a whole on the eve of the French Revolution. v. 7. This key volume specifically completes the collection of Edmund Burke's Indian Writings and Speeches which is set within the series, and is both an exposition of Burke's views on India from his coverage of the Hastings trial, and his views on maintaining the rule of a universal justice. The texts for the items, which have appeared in previous editions of Burke's Works, have been reconstructed, largely by the use of manuscripts. Indeed many of the shorter speeches appear here in print for the first time. The volume includes a key speech which introduced one of the main charges in the trial of Warren Hastings on an impeachment from 1789-1794, and an important report on the conduct of the trial. It closes with Burke's important and detailed summation of the prosecution's. However, this volume is not only a full exposition of Burke's views on India but contains much of great interest about other aspects of his thought. In particular, Burke saw himself in these years as being engaged in a battle against the lawless disruption of society, both in Europe and in Asia, in order to maintain the rule of a universal justice, a main theme of this volume. v. 8. This is the first edition of Burke's famous Reflections on the Revolution in France to appear for twenty years. No edition of his other writings on the Revolution has appeared for almost a century. In these years, the background against which Burke wrote has been much studied, throwing new light on his motives for commentating on France, and the reasons why his writings were both widely read and widely rejected. Published two hundred years after the outbreak of the French Revolution, this edition shows that the issues raised by the most influential commentaries on that Revolution have yet to be resolved. v. 9. This collection of the writings and speeches of Burke include a critique of the French Revolution which expresses much of his matured thinking on political and social life and issued a call for a European crusade to save civilization; and his thoughts on Irish constitutional, economic, and religious problems and Anglo-Irish relations. -- Publisher.

The Politics of Islamic LawThe Politics of Islamic Law



P. J. Marshall, ed., The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, Volume VII: India: The Hastings Trial, 17891794 (Oxford: Clarendon, 2000), 20. 15. Dirks 2001, 64. 16. Hasian 2002. 17. Edmund Burke, Final Speech at the Trial of Warren ...

Author: Iza R. Hussin

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226323343

Category:

Page: 351

View: 916

"In [this book], Iza R. Hussin compares India, Malaya, and Egypt during the British colonial period in order to trace the making and transformation of the contemporary category of "Islamic law." She demonstrates that not only is Islamic law not the shari{u06E5}a, but that its present institutional forms, substantive content, symbolic vocabulary, and relationship to state and society - in short, its politics - are built upon foundations laid during the colonial encounter. Drawing on extensive archival work in English, Arabic, and Malay - from court records to colonia and local papers to private letters and visual material - Hussin offers a view of politics in the colonial period as an iterative series of negotiations between local and colonia powers in multiple locations. ... Combining a genealogy of law with a political analysis of its institutional dynamics, t his book offers an up-close-look at the ways in which global transformations are realized at the local level."--Back cover.

An Intellectual History of Political CorruptionAn Intellectual History of Political Corruption



E. Burke (2000) 'Speech in Reply, 28 May 1794' in P.J. Marshall (ed.) Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, Vol. VII, India: The Hastings Trial 17891794 (Oxford: Clarendon Press), pp. 260–5; and The History of the Trial of Warren ...

Author: B. Buchan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137316615

Category:

Page: 291

View: 542

Few concepts have witnessed a more dramatic resurgence of interest in recent years than corruption. This book provides a compelling historical and conceptual analysis of corruption which demonstrates a persistent oscillation between restrictive 'public office' and expansive 'degenerative' connotations of corruption from classical Antiquity to 1800.

Commerce and Manners in Edmund Burke s Political EconomyCommerce and Manners in Edmund Burke s Political Economy



Burke attacked this philosophy as “mazes of metaphysic sophistry. ... 2 Abbé 1 Paul Langford, gen. ed., The Writing and Speeches of Edmund Burke, vol. VIII, The French ... VII: India: The Hastings Trial 17891794); L. G. Mitchell (Vol.

Author: Gregory M. Collins

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108801980

Category:

Page:

View: 979

Although many of Edmund Burke's speeches and writings contain prominent economic dimensions, his economic thought seldom receives the attention it warrants. Commerce and Manners in Edmund Burke's Political Economy stands as the most comprehensive study to date of this fascinating subject. In addition to providing rigorous textual analysis, Collins unearths previously unpublished manuscripts and employs empirical data to paint a rich historical and theoretical context for Burke's economic beliefs. Collins integrates Burke's reflections on trade, taxation, and revenue within his understanding of the limits of reason and his broader conception of empire. Such reflections demonstrate the ways that commerce, if properly managed, could be an instrument for both public prosperity and imperial prestige. More importantly, Commerce and Manners in Edmund Burke's Political Economy raises timely ethical questions about capitalism and its limits. In Burke's judgment, civilizations cannot endure on transactional exchange alone, and markets require ethical preconditions. There is a grace to life that cannot be bought.

Between Impunity and ImperialismBetween Impunity and Imperialism



The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke: Vol. VII, India: The Hastings Trial 17891794, ed. P.J. Marshall. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000. Burke, Edmund. “Motion Relative to the Speech from the Throne, 14 June 1784.

Author: Kevin E. Davis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190070823

Category:

Page: 304

View: 191

When people pay bribes to foreign public officials, how should the law respond? This question has been debated ever since the enactment of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977, and some of the key arguments can be traced back to Cicero in the last years of the Roman Republic and Edmund Burke in late eighteenth-century England. In recent years, the U.S. and other members of the OECD have joined forces to make anti-bribery law one of the most prominent sources of liability for firms and individuals who operate across borders. The modern regime is premised on the idea that transnational bribery is a serious problem which invariably merits a vigorous legal response. The shape of that response can be summed up in the phrase "every little bit helps," which in practice means that: prohibitions on bribery should capture a broad range of conduct; enforcement should target as broad a range of actors as possible; sanctions should be as stiff as possible; and as many agencies as possible should be involved in the enforcement process. An important challenge to the OECD paradigm, labelled here the "anti-imperialist critique," accepts that transnational bribery is a serious problem but questions the conventional responses. This book uses a series of high-profile cases to illustrate key elements of transnational bribery law in action, and analyzes the law through the lenses of both the OECD paradigm and the anti-imperialist critique. It ultimately defends a distinctively inclusive and experimentalist approach to transnational bribery law.

Romantic Representations of British IndiaRomantic Representations of British India



Tomorrow the Delinquents of India may be the Commons of Great Britain', Speech On The Fourth Day Of Impeachment (7 May 1789), The Writings and Speeches of Edmund Burke, vol. VII, India: The Hastings Trial 17891794, ed.

Author: Michael J Franklin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134183098

Category:

Page: 304

View: 217

Michael J. Franklin's Romantic Representations of British India is a timely study of the impact of Orientalist knowledge upon British culture during the Romantic period. The subject of the book is not so much India, but the British cultural understanding of India, particularly between 1750 and 1850. Franklin opens up new areas of investigation in Romantic-period culture, as those texts previously located in the ghetto of ‘Anglo-Indian writing’ are restored to a central place in the wider field of Romanticism. The essays within this collection cover a wide range of topics and are written by an impressive troupe of contributors including P.J. Marshall, Anne Mellor, and Nigel Leask. Students and academics involved with literary studies and history will find this book extremely useful, though musicologists and historians of science and of religion will also make good use of the book, as will those interested in questions of gender, race, and colonialism.