The Text of Genesis 1 11The Text of Genesis 1 11



Ronald S. Hendel offers a careful and thorough re examination of the text of Genesis 1 11.

Author: Ronald S. Hendel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019535317X

Category:

Page: 184

View: 990

Ronald S. Hendel offers a careful and thorough re examination of the text of Genesis 1 11. He takes a strongly positive position on the value of the Septuagint as a reliable translation of its Hebrew parent text. This position is contrary to that taken in most existing studies of the text of Genesis, including some in standard editions and reference works. Nevertheless, Hendel shows, there is an accumulating mass of evidence indicating that his position is correct. Hendel begins with a discussion of theory and method, and points out the lessons to be learned from the new biblical manuscripts discovered at Qumran. He goes on to argue for the preparation of eclectic critical editions of books of the Hebrew Bible a task long pursued in Classical, New Testament, and Septuagint studies, but still highly controversial with respect to the Hebrew scriptures. The critical edition of Genesis 1 11 which follows is Hendel's first step toward such a comprehensive task.

The Formation of Genesis 1 11The Formation of Genesis 1 11



This book synthesizes prior scholarship to show how both the P and non-Priestly strata of Genesis also emerged out of a complex interaction by Judean scribes with non-biblical literary traditions, particularly with Mesopotamian textual ...

Author: David M. Carr

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190062569

Category:

Page: 320

View: 653

There is general agreement in the field of Biblical studies that study of the formation of the Pentateuch is in disarray. David M. Carr turns to the Genesis Primeval History, Genesis 1-11, to offer models for the formation of Pentateuchal texts that may have traction within this fractious context. Building on two centuries of historical study of Genesis 1-11, this book provides new support for the older theory that the bulk of Genesis 1-11 was created out of a combination of two originally separate source strata: a Priestly source and an earlier non-Priestly source that was used to supplement the Priestly framework. Though this overall approach contradicts some recent attempts to replace such source models with theories of post-Priestly scribal expansion, Carr does find evidence of multiple layers of scribal revision in the non-P and P sources, from the expansion of an early independent non-Priestly primeval history with a flood narrative and related materials to a limited set of identifiable layers of Priestly material that culminate in the P-like redaction of the whole. This book synthesizes prior scholarship to show how both the P and non-Priestly strata of Genesis also emerged out of a complex interaction by Judean scribes with non-biblical literary traditions, particularly with Mesopotamian textual traditions about primeval origins. The Formation of Genesis 1-11 makes a significant contribution to scholarship on one of the most important texts in the Hebrew Bible and will influence models for the formation of the Hebrew Bible as a whole.

Genesis 1 11Genesis 1 11



Notable features include:* commentary based on THE NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION;* the NIV text printed in the body of the commentary;* sound scholarly methodology that reflects capable research in the original languages;* interpretation that ...

Author: Kenneth Mathews

Publisher: B&H Publishing Group

ISBN: 9781433675515

Category:

Page: 528

View: 411

THE NEW AMERICAN COMMENTARY is for the minister or Bible student who wants to understand and expound the Scriptures. Notable features include:* commentary based on THE NEW INTERNATIONAL VERSION;* the NIV text printed in the body of the commentary;* sound scholarly methodology that reflects capable research in the original languages;* interpretation that emphasizes the theological unity of each book and of Scripture as a whole;* readable and applicable exposition.

Genesis 1 11Genesis 1 11



On this shared ground we listen as leading pastoral theologians of six centuries gather around the text of Scripture and offer their best theological, spiritual and pastoral insights.

Author: Andrew Louth

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1579582206

Category:

Page: 204

View: 429

The Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture series is an ecumenical project, promoting a vital link of communication between the varied Christian traditions of today and their common ancient ancestors in the faith. On this shared ground we listen as leading pastoral theologians of six centuries gather around the text of Scripture and offer their best theological, spiritual and pastoral insights. With the aid of computer technology, the vast array of writings from the church fathers-- including much that is available only in the ancient languages-- have been searched for their comment on Scripture, then hand-selected by scholars who then shaped and annotated the materials to introduce it to today's readers. Each portion of commentary has been chosen for its salient insight, its rhetorical power and its faithful representation of the consensual exegesis of the early church.--Book jackets and publisher's website.

The Text of Genesis 1 11The Text of Genesis 1 11



2:7 19, 34, 54 2:8 34, 37, 88, 124 2:9 122, 124 2:11 41, 43, ... Genesis 1:1–2:3 37–38 1:1-2:4 16–39, 115, 122 1:1 35, 69 1:2 18-19 1:3 20, 88, 120 1:4 23, ...

Author: Ronald S. Hendel

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195119619

Category:

Page: 168

View: 121

Ronald S. Hendel offers a careful and thorough re examination of the text of Genesis 1 11. He takes a strongly positive position on the value of the Septuagint as a reliable translation of its Hebrew parent text. This position is contrary to that taken in most existing studies of the text of Genesis, including some in standard editions and reference works. Nevertheless, Hendel shows, there is an accumulating mass of evidence indicating that his position is correct.Hendel begins with a discussion of theory and method, and points out the lessons to be learned from the new biblical manuscripts discovered at Qumran. He goes on to argue for the preparation of eclectic critical editions of books of the Hebrew Bible a task long pursued in Classical, New Testament, and Septuagint studies, but still highly controversial with respect to the Hebrew scriptures. The critical edition of Genesis 1 11 which follows is Hendel's first step toward such a comprehensive task.

The Message of Genesis 1 11The Message of Genesis 1 11



This beautifully redesigned edition has also been sensitively updated to include modern references and use the NRSV Bible text.

Author: David Atkinson

Publisher: Inter-Varsity Press

ISBN: 9781783596409

Category:

Page: 150

View: 943

Where do we come from? What is our purpose? The early chapters of Genesis proclaim the origin of the world, and of human life on earth. In The Message of Genesis 1-11, David Atkinson explores how the first eleven chapters serve as an overture to the rest of the Bible. They evoke wonder as God is portrayed in his creative power and beauty. They reveal his loving mercy and salvation even in his terrible judgment of those who turn from him and despoil the harmony of creation. With vivid, provocative insight, Atkinson illuminates how the meaning of Genesis is still resonant today - providing the insight that allows us to understand both the greatness and the tragic flaw inherent in human beings. Although it was written thousands of years ago, the message of Genesis is one of timely urgency for the modern world: we are responsible participants in God's creation who must, like Noah, confront the possibility of global catastrophe. Part of the loved and trusted The Bible Speaks Today series of commentaries, The Message of Genesis 1-11 offers an insightful, readable exposition of the Biblical text and thought-provoking discussion of how its meaning relates to contemporary life. Used by Bible students and teachers around the world, The Bible Speaks Today commentaries are ideal for anyone studying or preaching Genesis and who want to delve deeper into the text. This beautifully redesigned edition has also been sensitively updated to include modern references and use the NRSV Bible text. Readable and reliable, The Message of Genesis 1-11 will help for anyone looking for a commentary on the Genesis that makes clear its meaning both in its original context and for twenty-first century readers.

Words Become WorldsWords Become Worlds



By carefully analyzing the text-semantic features of Genesis 1-11, this book offers a quite new perspective on the primaeval history: not a story concerning the human being in relation to God, nor one about the human being who falls from ...

Author: E. J. Van Wolde

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004098879

Category:

Page: 218

View: 327

By carefully analyzing the text-semantic features of Genesis 1-11, this book offers a quite new perspective on the primaeval history: not a story concerning the human being in relation to God, nor one about the human being who falls from bad to worse, but a rather different landscape seen from the Tower of Babel as lookout. In the second part of the book the methodological framework of this text-semantic study is presented.

Genesis 1 11Genesis 1 11



The commentary engages these approaches, along with other recent proposals and methods, in providing a multi-layered reading of the diverse texts and strata of Genesis 1-11.

Author: David M. Carr

Publisher: Kohlhammer Verlag

ISBN: 9783170375130

Category:

Page: 360

View: 434

There has been a recent trend to date many non-Priestly texts later than their Priestly counterparts, and this movement has significant synchronic, as well as diachronic, implications. The commentary engages these approaches, along with other recent proposals and methods, in providing a multi-layered reading of the diverse texts and strata of Genesis 1-11. This combination of diachronic and synchronic approaches yields new insights into these evocative and influential narratives at the outset of the Bible.

Genesis 1 11Genesis 1 11



Much like a tour guide informs his group about particular features of an often-visited city, this guide to Gen 111 discusses aspects of the biblical text ...

Author: David M. Carr

Publisher: Kohlhammer Verlag

ISBN: 9783170375123

Category:

Page: 360

View: 480

There has been a recent trend to date many non-Priestly texts later than their Priestly counterparts, and this movement has significant synchronic, as well as diachronic, implications. The commentary engages these approaches, along with other recent proposals and methods, in providing a multi-layered reading of the diverse texts and strata of Genesis 1-11. This combination of diachronic and synchronic approaches yields new insights into these evocative and influential narratives at the outset of the Bible.

Genesis 1 11Genesis 1 11



translations borrowed the analogy of Gen 8:1 where “God made a wind sweep ... 2011); the text of Genesis 111 being commented upon is given in italics.

Author: James Chukwuma Okoye

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781532609916

Category:

Page: 170

View: 231

Genesis 1–11: A Narrative Theological Commentary combines critical acumen with concern for the theological message of Scripture. It is a commentary in two stages. First, the text is allowed to speak for itself, using a narrative approach. Then, specific Jewish and Christian traditions flowing from the text are identified, and the underlying hermeneutical moves analyzed.

Genesis 1 11Genesis 1 11



This volume, covering Genesis 1-11, is concerned with what the author calls the story of primeval events.

Author: Claus Westermann

Publisher:

ISBN: 0281040338

Category:

Page: 636

View: 402

This volume, covering Genesis 1-11, is concerned with what the author calls the story of primeval events. He looks at each part of the text from different angles, examining the literary form, the historical setting, the thrust of the narrative, as well as a commentary on the text itself.

Genesis 1 11Genesis 1 11



First, the text is allowed to speak for itself, using a narrative approach. Then, specific Jewish and Christian traditions flowing from the text are identified, and the underlying hermeneutical moves analyzed.

Author: James Chukwuma Okoye

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781532609923

Category:

Page: 170

View: 301

Genesis 1-11: A Narrative Theological Commentary combines critical acumen with concern for the theological message of Scripture. It is a commentary in two stages. First, the text is allowed to speak for itself, using a narrative approach. Then, specific Jewish and Christian traditions flowing from the text are identified, and the underlying hermeneutical moves analyzed.

Genesis 1 11Genesis 1 11



Furthermore, the text of the Hebrew Bible that we have, the so-called ... In the case of Genesis 1-11, see Ronald S. Hendel, The Text of Genesis 1-11: ...

Author: Andrew Louth

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN: 9780830897261

Category:

Page: 204

View: 229

The creation narrative in the early chapters of Genesis proved irresistible to the church fathers. Following the apostle Paul, they explored the six days of creation and the profound significance of Adam as a type of Christ, the second Adam. With comment from Basil the Great, Ambrose, and Augustine, this ACCS volume on Genesis 1-11 opens up a treasure house of ancient wisdom.

Genesis 1 11 26Genesis 1 11 26



Biblical revelation is grounded in historical events which have been interpreted by the sole authoritative voice of the text. 6. Genesis 111 and Ancient ...

Author: K. A. Mathews

Publisher: B&H Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780805401011

Category:

Page: 528

View: 608

One in an ongoing series of esteemed and popular Bible commentary volumes based on the New International Version text.

Revisiting the Days of GenesisRevisiting the Days of Genesis



This book attempts to offer an answer to this question by analyzing the ancient Near Eastern and literary context of the Book of Genesis in terms of its use of temporal language in determining its value within the narrative.

Author: Bryan C. Hodge

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781608995974

Category:

Page: 198

View: 423

A commitment to historical-grammatical hermeneutics often has been confused with a commitment to literal language. Time, in our modern conception, has been construed as a measurement of temporal units, and the numbers assigned to them, as merely counting those units. However, a study is needed to explore whether this is the Genesis author's use of time, and whether numerical values utilized suggest something other than tracking simple measurements. This book attempts to offer an answer to this question by analyzing the ancient Near Eastern and literary context of the Book of Genesis in terms of its use of temporal language in determining its value within the narrative. It is the contention of this book that both of these concepts have been misunderstood to such an extent that these misperceptions often obstruct interpreters from understanding the sociological and theological intent of the author to convey a theology of God, man, creation, and chaos that addresses concerns of both the ancient and the modern reader.

Toward a Poetics of Genesis 1 11Toward a Poetics of Genesis 1 11



198 We gather from his study that the personal names of Gen 111 play a vital role in helping the interpreter grasp the meaning of the text, ...

Author: Daniel D. Lowery

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9781575066943

Category:

Page: 296

View: 739

Daniel Lowery commences this work by suggesting that history is a subjective enterprise—it is controlled by those who record it. The power of the present decides what is counted as history, and how the rest of us are told about the past shapes our view of it and, concomitantly, our outlook for the future. In this sense, then, history fundamentally shapes the future. Few questions are more basic to human existence than Who am I? Where did I come from? What is my place in this world? The earliest chapters of Genesis have oriented hearers and readers for millennia in their attempts to address these concerns. And so, in several respects, Genesis shapes the future. In this study, Lowery sets out to understand more accurately ancient Near Eastern language and claims about origins, specifically claims found in Gen 1–11. He uses Gen 4:17–22 as a test case representing the Hebrew tradition explaining how the world came to be civilized. Lowery observes that this passage serves a function within the larger narrative of Gen 1–11 akin to other ancient Near Eastern traditions of civilized beginnings. Moreover, it occupies a place in the overarching “narrative of beginnings” corresponding to what we find elsewhere throughout the ancient world. Lowery focuses mainly on Mesopotamia, leaving other cultures for later study. This study aims to demonstrate that much of the language of Gen 1–11 is similar in many ways to its Mesopotamian counterparts. More explicitly, here is an exploration of the nature of the language and terms of Gen 1–11 to ascertain what truths it communicates and how it communicates them. At its core, this is a study of the genre and generic claims of protohistory as found in Gen 1–11.