The Short and Tragic Life of Robert PeaceThe Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace



Traces a young man's effort to escape the dangers of the streets and his own nature after graduating from Yale, describing his youth in violent 1980s Newark, efforts to navigate two fiercely insular worlds and life-ending drug deals. 75,000 ...

Author: Jeff Hobbs

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781476731919

Category:

Page: 406

View: 288

Traces a young man's effort to escape the dangers of the streets and his own nature after graduating from Yale, describing his youth in violent 1980s Newark, efforts to navigate two fiercely insular worlds and life-ending drug deals. 75,000 first printing.

Summary the Short and Tragic Life of Robert PeaceSummary the Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace



This is a summary and analysis of the book and NOT the original book This Book Contains: * Summary Of The Entire Book * Chapter By Chapter Breakdown * Analysis Of The Reading Experience Download Your Copy Today

Author: Summary Station

Publisher:

ISBN: 1533677395

Category:

Page: 52

View: 246

The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man Who Left Newark for the Ivy League | SummaryBook Preview:In The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace, Jeff Hobbs' seamlessly weaves the socioeconomic and racial realities of the residents of Newark, New Jersey while highlighting the story of a mother and son, Jackie and Robert Peace. Hobbs' research and intimate writing style provides the reader with an in-depth view of what Jackie endured to give her son a chance at a better life. It also effectively demonstrates how someone like Robert Peace, who is given every chance at a better life, can still make the choices that ultimately leads to their demise. For those who have been blessed, or lucky, to live above poverty it can be difficult to understand just how difficult it can be to be truly poor. The struggles are not limited strictly to a lack of funds but also to location, education, and family demands, among other things. To provide a greater opportunity for her son, Jackie Peace, did her best to overcome each of these limitations. While working she sought higher education so as to further her career prospects. To pay for private school she had to work long hours at multiple jobs and in turn was given less time to spend with her son. This is a summary and analysis of the book and NOT the original book This Book Contains: * Summary Of The Entire Book * Chapter By Chapter Breakdown * Analysis Of The Reading Experience Download Your Copy Today

The TouristsThe Tourists



Wandering the streets of Manhattan while thinking about the lives of his three former Yale classmates, a disaffected professional considers how their respective quests for happiness have remained unfulfilled in spite of their financial ...

Author: Jeff Hobbs

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780743290968

Category:

Page: 336

View: 500

Wandering the streets of Manhattan while thinking about the lives of his three former Yale classmates, a disaffected professional considers how their respective quests for happiness have remained unfulfilled in spite of their financial successes. A first novel. Reprint. 20,000 first printing.

Show Them You re GoodShow Them You re Good



In this “exceptional work of investigative journalism…laced with compassion, insight, and humor” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) Jeff Hobbs stunningly captures the challenges and triumphs of being a young person confronting the ...

Author: Jeff Hobbs

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781982116354

Category:

Page: 336

View: 175

The acclaimed, award-winning author of The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace presents a “carefully observed journalistic account [that] widens our view of the modern ‘immigrant experience’” (The New York Times Book Review) as he closely follows four Los Angeles high school boys as they apply to college. Four teenage boys are high school seniors at two very different schools within the city of Los Angeles, the second largest school district in the nation with nearly 700,000 students. In this “exceptional work of investigative journalism…laced with compassion, insight, and humor” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) Jeff Hobbs stunningly captures the challenges and triumphs of being a young person confronting the future—both their own and the cultures in which they live—in contemporary America. Blending complex social issues with each individual experience, Hobbs takes us deep inside these boys’ worlds. The foursome includes Carlos, the younger son of undocumented delivery workers, who aims to follow in his older brother’s footsteps and attend an Ivy League college; Tio harbors serious ambitions to become an engineer despite a father who doesn’t believe in him; Jon, devoted member of the academic decathalon team, struggles to put distance between himself and his mother, who is suffocating him with her own expectations; and Owen, raised in a wealthy family, can’t get serious about academics but knows he must. Including portraits of secondary characters—friends, peers, parents, teachers, and girlfriends—this “uniquely illuminating” (Booklist) masterwork of immersive journalism is destined to ignite conversations about class, race, expectations, cultural divides, and even the concept of fate. Hobbs’s portrayal of these young men is not only revelatory and relevant, but also moving, eloquent, and indelibly powerful.

SupernormalSupernormal



The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace : Jeff Hobbs, The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man Who Left Newark for the Ivy League (New York: Scribner, 2014). try to be self-sufficient: Henry Krystal and John H.

Author: Meg Jay

Publisher: Canongate Books

ISBN: 9781782114956

Category:

Page: 400

View: 296

In this seminal new study of resilience, Meg Jay tells the stories of a diverse group of people who have overcome trauma in their childhoods to go on and live successful lives as adults. These are the 'supernormal', who having shouldered greater than average hardship as children defy expectation and achieve better than average success as adults. But how, and at what cost? Whether it was experiencing parental divorce, or growing up with an alcohol or drug-abusing parent, living with a parent or sibling with mental illness, being bullied, living in poverty, being a witness to domestic violence, suffering physical or emotional neglect, the people Meg Jay introduces us to are all survivors. She explores what they have in common that made it possible for them to transcend the trauma of their early years and to build successful adult lives. And she asks the questions: What was the cost of developing those powers? And having survived, even thrived, how do you go on and build a trusting, fulfilled life? Drawing on her clinical experience with survivors of childhood trauma, Meg Jay documents ordinary people made extraordinary by the experience of all-too-common trauma. Bringing together personal, scientific and cultural knowledge Jay gives a voice to the experience of the 'supernormal', furnishes them with the tools to better understand themselves and take full advantage of their strengths, and gives a window into their world for those who seek to understand them.

Breakaway LearnersBreakaway Learners



For a poignant example of this, read Jeff Hobbs's book on his college roommate, Robert Peace, The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man Who Left Newark for the Ivy League. Sadly, Peace never finds peace and always ...

Author: Karen Gross

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN: 9780807775776

Category:

Page: 224

View: 189

This powerful book explores how institutions of higher education can successfully serve “breakaway” students—first-generation, low-income students who are trying to break away from the past in order to create a more secure future. The gap between low-SES and high-SES students persists as efforts to close it have not met with great success. In this provocative book, Gross offers a new approach to addressing inequities by focusing on students who have succeeded despite struggling with the impacts of poverty and trauma. Gross draws on her experience as a college president to outline practical steps that postsecondary institutions can take to create structures of support and opportunity that build reciprocal trust. Students must trust their institutions and professors, professors must trust their students, and eventually students must learn to trust themselves. “A must-read for academics, policymakers, teachers, social service providers, police chiefs, and government officials.” —Martha Kanter, former under secretary, U.S. Department of Education “We need to pay attention to what Karen Gross says. Read this book, then share it.” —Mark Huddleston, president, University of New Hampshire “Karen Gross offers practical ideas based on her research and, more importantly, on her substantial leadership in assisting our nation’s colleges and universities serving at-risk students.” —Marybeth Gasman, University of Pennsylvania

Show Them You re GoodShow Them You re Good



Traces the academic pursuits of four Los Angeles high school boys with very different backgrounds and resources who navigate challenges in class, race, expectations, cultural divides and luck to attend college.

Author: Jeff Hobbs

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781982116347

Category:

Page: 352

View: 395

The acclaimed, award-winning author of The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace presents a “carefully observed journalistic account [that] widens our view of the modern ‘immigrant experience’” (The New York Times Book Review) as he closely follows four Los Angeles high school boys as they apply to college. Four teenage boys are high school seniors at two very different schools within the city of Los Angeles, the second largest school district in the nation with nearly 700,000 students. In this “exceptional work of investigative journalism…laced with compassion, insight, and humor” (Publishers Weekly, starred review) Jeff Hobbs stunningly captures the challenges and triumphs of being a young person confronting the future—both their own and the cultures in which they live—in contemporary America. Blending complex social issues with each individual experience, Hobbs takes us deep inside these boys’ worlds. The foursome includes Carlos, the younger son of undocumented delivery workers, who aims to follow in his older brother’s footsteps and attend an Ivy League college; Tio harbors serious ambitions to become an engineer despite a father who doesn’t believe in him; Jon, devoted member of the academic decathalon team, struggles to put distance between himself and his mother, who is suffocating him with her own expectations; and Owen, raised in a wealthy family, can’t get serious about academics but knows he must. Including portraits of secondary characters—friends, peers, parents, teachers, and girlfriends—this “uniquely illuminating” (Booklist) masterwork of immersive journalism is destined to ignite conversations about class, race, expectations, cultural divides, and even the concept of fate. Hobbs’s portrayal of these young men is not only revelatory and relevant, but also moving, eloquent, and indelibly powerful.

Seeing My SkinSeeing My Skin



In 2015 Jeff Hobbs published The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace, a biography of his college roommate. Jeff, Robert, and I were in the same class at Yale. I never knew either of them, though I'm sure we crossed paths.

Author: Peter Jarrett-Schell

Publisher: Church Publishing

ISBN: 9781640651920

Category:

Page: 288

View: 154

• A personal journey of a priest’s understanding of his Whiteness widens into an invitation to wrestle with larger cultural issues of race and belonging With humor, and a sharp, easily-readable style, Peter Jarrett-Schell delves deeply into how Whiteness has shaped his life. By telling his story, he challenges readers to personally consider the role of race in their own lives. In recent years, white institutions, congregations, and individuals have all begun to wrestle with their racial legacy. But these reflections often get lost abstracting ideas of “white privilege,” “white fragility,” “structural racism,” and the like, until they become nothing more than jargon. This book challenges its readers to look closely at how these concepts show up in their everyday lives. By examining how Whiteness has distorted his own perceptions, relationships, and sense of self, Jarrett-Schell argues for the personal stakes that white people have in dismantling racism, and offers the creative possibilities that emerge when we begin to do the work.

My SociologyMy Sociology



This is the true story of The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace (Hobbs 2014). The telling of the story raises many questions. If not for his untimely death, would he finally have applied to graduate school?

Author: Rosalind Gottfried

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781315402819

Category:

Page: 652

View: 192

My Sociology reconceptualizes intro sociology for the changing demographics in today’s higher education environment. Concise and student-focused, My Sociology captures students' attention with engaging stories and a focus on non-dominant populations. Rather than introducing students to theory and history at the beginning of the text, the book integrates the necessary information throughout to keep students engaged.

Skulls and KeysSkulls and Keys



The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man Who Left Newark for the Ivy League. New York: Scribner's, 2014. Hocmuth, Marie and Richard Murphy. “Rhetoric and Elocutionary Training in Nineteenth Century Colleges,” in ...

Author: David Alan Richards

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781681775814

Category:

Page: 400

View: 218

The mysterious, highly influential hidden world of Yale’s secret societies is revealed in a definitive and scholarly history. Secret societies have fundamentally shaped America’s cultural and political landscapes. In ways that are expected but never explicit, the bonds made through the most elite of secret societies have won members Pulitzer Prizes, governorships, and even presidencies. At the apex of these institutions stands Yale University and its rumored twenty-six secret societies. Tracing a history that has intrigued and enthralled for centuries, alluring the attention of such luminaries as Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner and F. Scott Fitzgerald, Skulls and Keys traces the history of Yale’s societies as they set the foundation for America’s future secret clubs and helped define the modern age of politics. But there is a progressive side to Yale’s secret societies that we rarely hear about, one that, in the cultural tumult of the nineteen-sixties, resulted in the election of people of color, women, and gay men, even in proportions beyond their percentages in the class. It’s a side that is often overlooked in favor of sensational legends of blood oaths and toe-curling conspiracies. Dave Richards, an alum of Yale, sheds some light on the lesser known stories of Yale’s secret societies. He takes us through the history from Phi Beta Kappa in the American Revolution (originally a social and drinking society) through Skull and Bones and its rivals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. While there have been articles and books on some of those societies, there has never been a scholarly history of the system as a whole.