The Revolution Wasn t TelevisedThe Revolution Wasn t Televised



blue skies and strange bedfellows 226 alternate route, a slightly different combination of Wires and transmitters for delivering television signals. But by 1970 all reference to the service began to be dropped and to be replaced by the ...

Author: Lynn Spigel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135220761

Category:

Page: 320

View: 325

Caricatures of sixties television--called a "vast wasteland" by the FCC president in the early sixties--continue to dominate our perceptions of the era and cloud popular understanding of the relationship between pop culture and larger social forces. Opposed to these conceptions, The Revolution Wasn't Televised explores the ways in which prime-time television was centrally involved in the social conflicts of the 1960s. It was then that television became a ubiquitous element in American homes. The contributors in this volume argue that due to TV's constant presence in everyday life, it became the object of intense debates over childraising, education, racism, gender, technology, politics, violence, and Vietnam. These essays explore the minutia of TV in relation to the macro-structure of sixties politics and society, attempting to understand the struggles that took place over representation the nation's most popular communications media during the 1960s.

The Revolution Wasn t TelevisedThe Revolution Wasn t Televised



These essays explore the minutia of TV in relation to the macro-structure of sixties politics and society, attempting to understand the struggles that took place over representation the nation's most popular communications media during the ...

Author: Lynn Spigel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135205393

Category:

Page: 320

View: 619

Caricatures of sixties television--called a "vast wasteland" by the FCC president in the early sixties--continue to dominate our perceptions of the era and cloud popular understanding of the relationship between pop culture and larger social forces. Opposed to these conceptions, The Revolution Wasn't Televised explores the ways in which prime-time television was centrally involved in the social conflicts of the 1960s. It was then that television became a ubiquitous element in American homes. The contributors in this volume argue that due to TV's constant presence in everyday life, it became the object of intense debates over childraising, education, racism, gender, technology, politics, violence, and Vietnam. These essays explore the minutia of TV in relation to the macro-structure of sixties politics and society, attempting to understand the struggles that took place over representation the nation's most popular communications media during the 1960s.

The Revolution Will Not Be TelevisedThe Revolution Will Not Be Televised



www.oup.com/us/therevolutionwillnotbetelevised Oxford has created a website to accompany The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Protest Music After Fukushima. Video, audio, links to multimedia, and color photos are provided here.

Author: Noriko Manabe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190606534

Category:

Page: 464

View: 342

Nuclear power has been a contentious issue in Japan since the 1950s, and in the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, the conflict has only grown. Government agencies and the nuclear industry continue to push a nuclear agenda, while the mainstream media adheres to the official line that nuclear power is Japan's future. Public debate about nuclear energy is strongly discouraged. Nevertheless, antinuclear activism has swelled into one of the most popular and passionate movements in Japan, leading to a powerful wave of protest music. The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Protest Music After Fukushima shows that music played a central role in expressing antinuclear sentiments and mobilizing political resistance in Japan. Combining musical analysis with ethnographic participation, author Noriko Manabe offers an innovative typology of the spaces central to the performance of protest music--cyberspace, demonstrations, festivals, and recordings. She argues that these four spaces encourage different modes of participation and methods of political messaging. The openness, mobile accessibility, and potential anonymity of cyberspace have allowed musicians to directly challenge the ethos of silence that permeated Japanese culture post-Fukushima. Moving from cyberspace to real space, Manabe shows how the performance and reception of music played at public demonstrations are shaped by the urban geographies of Japanese cities. While short on open public space, urban centers in Japan offer protesters a wide range of governmental and commercial spaces in which to demonstrate, with activist musicians tailoring their performances to the particular landscapes and soundscapes of each. Music festivals are a space apart from everyday life, encouraging musicians and audience members to freely engage in political expression through informative and immersive performances. Conversely, Japanese record companies and producers discourage major-label musicians from expressing political views in recordings, forcing antinuclear musicians to express dissent indirectly: through allegories, metaphors, and metonyms. The first book on Japan's antinuclear music, The Revolution Will Not Be Televised provides a compelling new perspective on the role of music in political movements.

The Revolution Will Not Be Televised Revised EdThe Revolution Will Not Be Televised Revised Ed



they could meet him, the one place where the ubiquitous presence of television couldn't distort his message—on Internet bulletin boards and web sites, chat rooms and web logs. Certainly, I had known that politics would eventually come ...

Author: Joe Trippi

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780061956911

Category:

Page: 336

View: 900

In a blend of Wired magazine and The Boys on the Bus, the man who invented Internet politics tells the story of how it was done and reveals how every sector can benefit from tech revolution. Campaign manager Joe Trippi, who signed on to run Howard Dean’s campaign when there was less than $100,000 in the till and fewer than 500 people involved, transformed the most obsure candidate in the field into the Democratic frontrunner and all-but-coronated party nominee in less than a year. The secret of Trippi’s off-the-charts success: a revolutionary use of the Internet, and an impassioned, contagious desire to overthrow politics-as-usual. Before Dean knew it, he had a groundswell of 600,000 Americans behind him, was leading in every poll, and had raised $45 million—more money than any Democrat in history. We now know that unprecedented fundraising, unheard-of numbers of people checking in on the Internet, chatting on blogs, reaching out to their fellow voters and showing up at house parties really can compete with—and in so many ways exceed— the more traditional approaches to winning in politics. But the why’s and how’s leave much fertile ground to plow, and for the first time, Trippi, an icon to all the Dean supporters he energized, is sharing his lessons learned, along with colorful behind-the-scenes stories from the campaign trail. Perhaps lulled by the bust of the dot.com boom, many have dismissed the Internet as old news. But if Dean’s campaign wasn’t enough of a wake-up call, this book is: Trippi reveals just how the sleeping power of technology can be harnessed, and illuminates how every organization and individual in America can benefit from the tidal wave of change on the horizon.

The Revolution Will Not Be TelevisedThe Revolution Will Not Be Televised



"'The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Protest Music After Fukushima' shows that music played a central role in expressing antinuclear sentiments and mobilizing political resistance in Japan.

Author: Noriko Manabe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199334698

Category:

Page: 464

View: 631

Nuclear power has been a contentious issue in Japan since the 1950s, and in the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, the conflict has only grown. Government agencies and the nuclear industry continue to push a nuclear agenda, while the mainstream media adheres to the official line that nuclear power is Japan's future. Public debate about nuclear energy is strongly discouraged. Nevertheless, antinuclear activism has swelled into one of the most popular and passionate movements in Japan, leading to a powerful wave of protest music. The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Protest Music After Fukushima shows that music played a central role in expressing antinuclear sentiments and mobilizing political resistance in Japan. Combining musical analysis with ethnographic participation, author Noriko Manabe offers an innovative typology of the spaces central to the performance of protest music--cyberspace, demonstrations, festivals, and recordings. She argues that these four spaces encourage different modes of participation and methods of political messaging. The openness, mobile accessibility, and potential anonymity of cyberspace have allowed musicians to directly challenge the ethos of silence that permeated Japanese culture post-Fukushima. Moving from cyberspace to real space, Manabe shows how the performance and reception of music played at public demonstrations are shaped by the urban geographies of Japanese cities. While short on open public space, urban centers in Japan offer protesters a wide range of governmental and commercial spaces in which to demonstrate, with activist musicians tailoring their performances to the particular landscapes and soundscapes of each. Music festivals are a space apart from everyday life, encouraging musicians and audience members to freely engage in political expression through informative and immersive performances. Conversely, Japanese record companies and producers discourage major-label musicians from expressing political views in recordings, forcing antinuclear musicians to express dissent indirectly: through allegories, metaphors, and metonyms. The first book on Japan's antinuclear music, The Revolution Will Not Be Televised provides a compelling new perspective on the role of music in political movements.

The Movement The Revolution Will Be TelevisedThe Movement The Revolution Will Be Televised



Gil ScottHeron wrote the brilliant song/poem The Revolution Will Not Be Televised. Every activist and radical loves this call to arms. We hope Gil has no objection to our reproducing his full poem... The Revolution Will Not Be Televised ...

Author: Adam Weishaupt

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN: 9781447890911

Category:

Page:

View: 514

Throughout history, the Illuminati have resisted the Old World Order: the network of elite families that have directed the course of human history since the dawn of civilization. The aim of the Power Elite has always been the same – to maintain themselves in power and privilege in perpetuity, at the expense of everyone else. In the past, they used brute force to subjugate the servile masses. Now they use something far more subtle: psychological manipulation. They know what buttons to push. They know what makes ordinary people tick, what they want and what they fear. Can they be stopped? The Movement is committed to their overthrow. The Movement seeks to bring true power to the people, to smash the networks of nepotism and cronyism that strangle the opportunities of ordinary people. Discover the philosophy, aims, strategy and tactics of the Movement. The Revolution WILL be televised. Will you feature in the historic pictures being beamed around the globe? Or will you watch from home in your comfy seat?

The Revolution Was TelevisedThe Revolution Was Televised



“It wasn't available to us. I'll give you my recollection of it. Matt Weiner was a writer for David Chase. The Sopranos was on the air. We didn't fuck with David Chase. We didn't fuck with his writers. Carolyn [Strauss] and I looked at ...

Author: Alan Sepinwall

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781476739687

Category:

Page: 400

View: 133

A phenomenal account, newly updated, of how twelve innovative television dramas transformed the medium and the culture at large, featuring Sepinwall’s take on the finales of Mad Men and Breaking Bad. In The Revolution Was Televised, celebrated TV critic Alan Sepinwall chronicles the remarkable transformation of the small screen over the past fifteen years. Focusing on twelve innovative television dramas that changed the medium and the culture at large forever, including The Sopranos, Oz, The Wire, Deadwood, The Shield, Lost, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, 24, Battlestar Galactica, Friday Night Lights, Mad Men, and Breaking Bad, Sepinwall weaves his trademark incisive criticism with highly entertaining reporting about the real-life characters and conflicts behind the scenes. Drawing on interviews with writers David Chase, David Simon, David Milch, Joel Surnow and Howard Gordon, Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse, and Vince Gilligan, among others, along with the network executives responsible for green-lighting these groundbreaking shows, The Revolution Was Televised is the story of a new golden age in TV, one that’s as rich with drama and thrills as the very shows themselves.

The Revolution Will Not Be Televised Revised EdThe Revolution Will Not Be Televised Revised Ed



The Revolution Will Not Be Televised is the incredible story of how Joe Trippi's revolutionary use of the Internet forever changed politics as we know it.

Author: Joe Trippi

Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks

ISBN: 006156107X

Category:

Page: 336

View: 950

When Joe Trippi signed on to manage Howard Dean's 2004 presidential campaign, the long-shot candidate had 432 known supporters and $100,000 in the bank. Within a year the most obscure horse in the field was the front-runner, with $50 million in the campaign till, thanks to Trippi and his team. The Revolution Will Not Be Televised is the incredible story of how Joe Trippi's revolutionary use of the Internet forever changed politics as we know it. Trippi's memoir cum manifesto offers a blueprint for engaging Americans in real dialogue—and is an instruction manual for how businesspeople, government leaders, and anyone else can make use of democracy. In a new afterword, Trippi reviews how these lessons have influenced the 2008 campaign, a race marked by higher voter interest than any other in recent history.

Ch vezCh vez



This book outlines how a popular and prize-winning documentary fast became controversial and subject to extensive attack including a formal BBC enquiry.

Author: Rod Stoneman

Publisher: Wallflower Press

ISBN: 1905674740

Category:

Page: 135

View: 833

The revolution will not be televised is a powerful and dramatic film about the charismatic and controversial Venezuelan President, Hugo Chavez. It charts the seven-months run-up to the dramatic attempt to overthrow him in April 2002 and provides an eye-witness account of the coup d'etat and the extraordinary return to power of Chavez some 48 hours later. Unique footage of Chavez, the new icon of the Left and thorn in the side of the US administration, is assembled in this electrifying documentary. This book outlines how a popular and prize-winning documentary fast became controversial and subject to extensive attack including a formal BBC enquiry.