The Red figure PotteryThe Red figure Pottery



However for about 75 years, in the middle of the 5th century B.C., Corinthian potters tried to imitate the Athenian fashion and this book catalogues 186 pieces of their work.

Author: Sharon Herbert

Publisher: ASCSA

ISBN: 0876610742

Category:

Page: 88

View: 603

Inferior clays and glazes, unsuited to the red-figure style, means that the indigenous production of red-figure vases in Corinth was very limited. However for about 75 years, in the middle of the 5th century B.C., Corinthian potters tried to imitate the Athenian fashion and this book catalogues 186 pieces of their work. The author discusses the reasons for the production of Corinthian red figure even in limited quantities. Six painters are identified as responsible for at least half the known pieces. Thirteen deposits provide chronological evidence to supplement that of the painting style. The volume serves to bring forward a small but significant segment of the non-Attic pottery industries, and should stimulate interest in other unpublished, unreported examples. All items in the catalogue are illustrated in photographs; line drawings are used to demonstrate details of technique.

Red figure Pottery in its Ancient SettingRed figure Pottery in its Ancient Setting



Contributions by Martin Langner, Annie Verbanck-Pierard, Adrienne Lezzi-Hafter, Athena Tsingarida, Maurizio Gualtieri, Helena Fracchia, Victoria Sabetai, Martin Bentz, Thomas Mannack, Stine Scierup and Guy Hedreen.

Author: Bodil Bundsgaard

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9788771243321

Category:

Page: 180

View: 984

Contributions on a variety of topics, e.g. mantle-figures on Athenian late classical red-figure, white-ground cups in fifth-century graves, late 'Apulian' red-figure vases, an overview of Athenian pottery in Southern Italy and Sicily, the Panathenaic amphora shape in Southern Italian red-figure production and Achilles and Troilos in Athens and Etruria. Contributions by Martin Langner, Annie Verbanck-Pierard, Adrienne Lezzi-Hafter, Athena Tsingarida, Maurizio Gualtieri, Helena Fracchia, Victoria Sabetai, Martin Bentz, Thomas Mannack, Stine Scierup and Guy Hedreen.

The Regional Production of Red Figure PotteryThe Regional Production of Red Figure Pottery



This collection of papers addresses key issues posed by these production centres. Why did they emerge?

Author: Stine Schierup

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 9788771243949

Category:

Page: 358

View: 924

In the latter part of the fifth century BC, regional red-figure productions were established outside Attica in regional Greece and in the western Mediterranean, propelled by the impact of the art of Attic vase painting. This collection of papers addresses key issues posed by these production centres. Why did they emerge? To what degree was their inception prompted by the emigration of Attic craftsmen in the context of the weakened Attic pottery market at the onset of the Peloponnesian War? How did Attic vase painting influence already existing traditions, and what was selected, adopted or adapted at the receiving end? Who was using red-figure in mainland Greece and Italy, and what were its particular functions in the local cultures? These and more questions are addressed here with the presentation not only of syntheses, but also primary publication of much newly discovered material. Regional production centres covered include those of Euboea, Boeotia, Corinth, Laconia, Macedonia, Ambracia, Lucania, Apulia, Sicily, Locri and Etruria.

The Red and the BlackThe Red and the Black



This volume also covers a hitherto neglected area: the history of the collecting of Greek pottery through the Renaissance and up to the present day.

Author: Brian A. Sparkes

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134525584

Category:

Page: 232

View: 734

The Red and the Black covers the major stages in the history of Greek pottery production, both figured and plain, as they are understood today. It provides an up-to-date evaluation of ways of studying Greek pottery and encourages new approaches. There is a detailed analysis of the subject matter of figured scenes covering some of the main preoccupations of ancient Greece: myth, fantasy and everyday life. Furthermore, it sets the artefacts in the context of the societies that produced them, highlighting the social, art historical, mythological and economic information that can be revealed from their study. This volume also covers a hitherto neglected area: the history of the collecting of Greek pottery through the Renaissance and up to the present day. It shows how market values have gradually increased to the high prices of today and goes on to take a closer look at the enthusiasm of the collectors.

Patterns in the Production of Apulian Red Figure PotteryPatterns in the Production of Apulian Red Figure Pottery



This book takes a different approach by using a database containing in excess of 13,500 vessels and fragments to identify patterns in the production and decoration of Apulian vases that cast light on the choices made by vase-producers and ...

Author: Edward Herring

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781527517967

Category:

Page: 200

View: 691

Most of the previous scholarship on Apulian red-figure pottery has focused on the cataloguing of collections, the attribution of vases to painters and workshops, iconographic and stylistic matters, and individual vessels and vase forms. This partly reflects the history of vase-painting scholarship, which grew out of antiquarian collecting during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and the fact that a full archaeological provenance is not preserved for the overwhelming majority of vessels. This book takes a different approach by using a database containing in excess of 13,500 vessels and fragments to identify patterns in the production and decoration of Apulian vases that cast light on the choices made by vase-producers and the preferences of their customers. Individual chapters consider the popularity of different vessel shapes over time, the use of highly generic decorative scenes, which are characteristic of Apulian red-figure, as well as the popularity of scenes of myth, images of the gods, scenes of the life of the non-Greek population of ancient Puglia, and those showing funerary monuments. As virtually all of the vases in the sample derive from tombs, the patterns identified provide insights into the ways in which the ancient populations of South-East Italy, both Greek and indigenous, honoured their dead.

The Transformation of AthensThe Transformation of Athens



By demonstrating that changes in artistic style involve choices about what aspects of the world we decide to represent as well as how to represent them, this book rewrites the history of Greek art.

Author: Robin Osborne

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691177670

Category:

Page: 304

View: 125

How remarkable changes in ancient Greek pottery reveal the transformation of classical Greek culture Why did soldiers stop fighting, athletes stop competing, and lovers stop having graphic sex in classical Greek art? The scenes depicted on Athenian pottery of the mid-fifth century BC are very different from those of the late sixth century. Did Greek potters have a different world to see—or did they come to see the world differently? In this lavishly illustrated and engagingly written book, Robin Osborne argues that these remarkable changes are the best evidence for the shifting nature of classical Greek culture. Osborne examines the thousands of surviving Athenian red-figure pots painted between 520 and 440 BC and describes the changing depictions of soldiers and athletes, drinking parties and religious occasions, sexual relations, and scenes of daily life. He shows that it was not changes in each activity that determined how the world was shown, but changes in values and aesthetics. By demonstrating that changes in artistic style involve choices about what aspects of the world we decide to represent as well as how to represent them, this book rewrites the history of Greek art. By showing that Greeks came to see the world differently over the span of less than a century, it reassesses the history of classical Greece and of Athenian democracy. And by questioning whether art reflects or produces social and political change, it provokes a fresh examination of the role of images in an ever-evolving world.

Athenian Potters and Painters IIIAthenian Potters and Painters III



Athenian Potters and Painters III, the proceedings of an international conference held at the College of William and Mary in Virginia in 2012, will, like the previous two volumes, become a standard reference work in the study of Greek ...

Author: John Oakley

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 9781782976660

Category:

Page: 272

View: 244

Athenian Potters and Painters III presents a rich mass of new material on Greek vases, including finds from excavations at the Kerameikos in Athens and Despotiko in the Cyclades. Some contributions focus on painters or workshops Ð Paseas, the Robinson Group, and the structure of the figured pottery industry in Athens; others on vase forms Ð plates, phialai, cups, and the change in shapes at the end of the sixth century BC. Context, trade, kalos inscriptions, reception, the fabrication of inscribed paintersÕ names to create a fictitious biography, and the reconstruction of the contents of an Etruscan tomb are also explored. The iconography and iconology of various types of figured scenes on Attic pottery serve as the subject of a wide range of papers Ð chariots, dogs, baskets, heads, departures, an Amazonomachy, Menelaus and Helen, red-figure komasts, symposia, and scenes of pursuit. Among the special vases presented are a black spotlight stamnos and a column krater by the Suessula Painter. Athenian Potters and Painters III, the proceedings of an international conference held at the College of William and Mary in Virginia in 2012, will, like the previous two volumes, become a standard reference work in the study of Greek pottery.

The Italic Patronage of Early Apulian Red figureThe Italic Patronage of Early Apulian Red figure



This is, however, a conjecture that has not yet received support from archaeological finds.

Author: Jed M. Thorn

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:655927254

Category:

Page: 214

View: 655

This dissertation investigates the relationship between Early Apulian red-figure pottery workshops and the Italic peoples of Apulia. Apulian red-figure--produced from c. 430 BC through the end of the 4th century BC--is rarely found outside of South Italy. It has long been assumed that it was made in the modern Italian region of Puglia, where the majority of it has been found. The earliest Apulian red-figure pottery exhibits contiguity with contemporary trends in Attic red-figure; its style, iconography, and shape selection were, with a few notable exceptions, thoroughly Greek. Consequently, it has been widely assumed that red-figure potters and painters had emigrated from Athens to Taras, Apulia's only Greek colony, where they established a local industry that served as the exclusive supplier of Apulian red-figure pottery for roughly a century. This is, however, a conjecture that has not yet received support from archaeological finds. The questions of where Apulian red-figure was born and where it was made remain open; these are the central questions addressed in this dissertation. The analysis focuses on three main types of archaeological evidence: distributional, iconographic, and archaeometric. The distributional evidence confirms that the primary market for Early Apulian red-figure was a network of Italic (i.e., non-Greek) communities to the northwest of Taras (modern Taranto), on the Adriatic side of the Apulian Murge. The iconography of the vases that reached this market suggests that their painted scenes may have been consciously selected on account of the meaning they held for the people who acquired them. This evidence raises the possibility that Apulian red-figure painters and their patrons may have, in some cases, been in direction communication with each other, a possibility that does not accord well with traditional views regarding the locations of workshops. Finally, the core evidence cited in this study is data produced by a neutron activation analysis project that isolated the chemical compositions of 41 Apulian red-figure vases. The project's sample group included archaeological reference material made with Tarantine clays, enabling it to test the assumption that Early Apulian red-figure was produced exclusively at Taras. The chemical analysis demonstrated that while certain vase-painters can be linked decisively with Taras, other Early Apulian workshops were using a clay type that seems not to have been Tarantine in origin. The evidence presented and discussed in this dissertation suggests that some Early Apulian red-figure pottery was produced at Italic settlements outside of Taras. This conclusion has important implications for our understanding of intercultural dynamics in Classical Apulia.

The Art of Vase Painting in Classical AthensThe Art of Vase Painting in Classical Athens



In this book, Professor Martin Robertson draws together the results of a lifetime's study of Greek vase-painting, tracing the history of figure-drawing on Athenian pottery from the invention of the 'red-figure' technique in the later ...

Author: Martin Robertson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521338816

Category:

Page: 350

View: 878

The results of the author's lifetime's study of Greek vase-painting.

Ancient Greek Vase Painting StylesAncient Greek Vase Painting Styles



Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Author: Source Wikipedia

Publisher: University-Press.org

ISBN: 1230476725

Category:

Page: 74

View: 824

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 48. Chapters: Apulian vase painting, Argive vase painting, Belly Amphora by the Andokides Painter (Munich 2301), Bilingual vase painting, Black-figure pottery, Black-glazed Ware, Boeotian vase painting, Caeretan hydria, Campanian vase painting, Canosa vases, Centuripe Class, Chalkidian pottery, Cycladic vase painting, Diosphos Painter, East Greek Bird Bowl, East Greek vase painting, Etruscan vase painting, Euboean vase painting, Geometric art, Gnathia vases, Hadra vase, Ionic vase painting, Kerch style, Klazomenian sarcophagi, Klazomenian vase painting, Laconian vase painting, Lucanian vase painting, Mannerists (Greek vase painting), Minoan pottery, Minyan ware, Mycenaean pottery, Northampton Group, Orientalizing period, Paestan vase painting, Pontic Group, Protogeometric art, Pseudo-Chalkidian vase painting, Red-figure pottery, Rhodian vase painting, Samian vase painting, Sicilian vase painting, Six's technique, South Italian ancient Greek pottery, Thessalian vase painting, West Slope Ware, White ground technique, Wild Goat Style.

Athenian Potters and Painters IIIAthenian Potters and Painters III



Athenian Potters and Painters III, the proceedings of an international conference held at the College of William and Mary in Virginia in 2012, will, like the previous two volumes, become a standard reference work in the study of Greek ...

Author: John Oakley

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 9781782976639

Category:

Page: 272

View: 519

Athenian Potters and Painters III presents a rich mass of new material on Greek vases, including finds from excavations at the Kerameikos in Athens and Despotiko in the Cyclades. Some contributions focus on painters or workshops Ð Paseas, the Robinson Group, and the structure of the figured pottery industry in Athens; others on vase forms Ð plates, phialai, cups, and the change in shapes at the end of the sixth century BC. Context, trade, kalos inscriptions, reception, the fabrication of inscribed paintersÕ names to create a fictitious biography, and the reconstruction of the contents of an Etruscan tomb are also explored. The iconography and iconology of various types of figured scenes on Attic pottery serve as the subject of a wide range of papers Ð chariots, dogs, baskets, heads, departures, an Amazonomachy, Menelaus and Helen, red-figure komasts, symposia, and scenes of pursuit. Among the special vases presented are a black spotlight stamnos and a column krater by the Suessula Painter. Athenian Potters and Painters III, the proceedings of an international conference held at the College of William and Mary in Virginia in 2012, will, like the previous two volumes, become a standard reference work in the study of Greek pottery.

Ancient Etruscan and Greek Vases in the Elvehjem Museum of ArtAncient Etruscan and Greek Vases in the Elvehjem Museum of Art



From a Mycenaean cup of the 14th century B.C., through Villanovan urns, Etruscan bucchero, Corinthian, black-figure, red-figure, Campanian, Apulian, and Sicilian of the 3rd through 1st century B.C., here is a description and illustration of ...

Author: Elvehjem Museum of Art

Publisher: Chazen Museum of Art

ISBN: 093290047X

Category:

Page: 87

View: 812

From a Mycenaean cup of the 14th century B.C., through Villanovan urns, Etruscan bucchero, Corinthian, black-figure, red-figure, Campanian, Apulian, and Sicilian of the 3rd through 1st century B.C., here is a description and illustration of approximately sixty-five ancient Greek vases in the Elvehjem collection along with essays about the history of vase production and the use of the vase. Distributed for the Chazen Museum of Art, University of Wisconsin–Madison