The Purloining of Prince OleomargarineThe Purloining of Prince Oleomargarine



Twain began telling them the tale of Johnny, a poor boy in possession of some magical seeds. Later, Twain would jot down some rough notes about the story, but the tale was left unfinished . . . until now.

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: Doubleday Books for Young Readers

ISBN: 9780553523249

Category:

Page: 160

View: 334

A never-before-published, previously unfinished Mark Twain children’s story is brought to life by Philip and Erin Stead, creators of the Caldecott Medal-winning A Sick Day for Amos McGee. In a hotel in Paris one evening in 1879, Mark Twain sat with his young daughters, who begged their father for a story. Twain began telling them the tale of Johnny, a poor boy in possession of some magical seeds. Later, Twain would jot down some rough notes about the story, but the tale was left unfinished . . . until now. Plucked from the Mark Twain archive at the University of California at Berkeley, Twain’s notes now form the foundation of a fairy tale picked up over a century later. With only Twain’s fragmentary script and a story that stops partway as his guide, author Philip Stead has written a tale that imagines what might have been if Twain had fully realized this work. Johnny, forlorn and alone except for his pet chicken, meets a kind woman who gives him seeds that change his fortune, allowing him to speak with animals and sending him on a quest to rescue a stolen prince. In the face of a bullying tyrant king, Johnny and his animal friends come to understand that generosity, empathy, and quiet courage are gifts more precious in this world than power and gold. Illuminated by Erin Stead’s graceful, humorous, and achingly poignant artwork, this is a story that reaches through time and brings us a new book from America’s most legendary writer, envisioned by two of today’s most important names in children’s literature. "will capture the imaginations of readers of all ages"—USA Today, ★ ★ ★ ★ (out of four stars) ★ "Completing a story penned by arguably America's greatest author is no easy feat, but the Caldecott-winning author-illustrator (and husband-wife) team proves more than equal to the task. . . . A pensive and whimsical work that Twain would applaud."—Kirkus, starred review ★ "a cast of eccentric characters, celestially fine writing, and a crusade against pomp that doesn't sacrifice humor."—Publishers Weekly, starred review ★ "The result is a gift to the eye. Samuel Langhorne Clemens himself would be proud."—Booklist, starred review ★ "The combination of Twain’s (often sarcastic) humor and “lessons of life,” a touch of allegory, and Stead’s own storytelling skills result in an awesome piece of fantasy."—School Library Journal, starred review "artful and meta and elegant”—The Wall Street Journal "Johnny is destined to become as much a part of Twain lore as Tom, Huck, Jim and The Mysterious Stranger."—Hartford Courant "bound to become a reading staple for all ages."—RealSimple.com

The Adventures of Tom SawyerThe Adventures of Tom Sawyer



Notable Mark Twain novels includes: NOVELS: The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today (1873) The Prince and the Pauper (1881) A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889) The American Claimant (1892) Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894) Personal ...

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher:

ISBN: 1659620376

Category:

Page: 160

View: 432

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain is an 1876 novel about a young boy growing up along the Mississippi River. The story is set in the fictional town of St. Petersburg, inspired by Hannibal, Missouri, where Twain lived. Tom Sawyer lives with his Aunt Polly and his half-brother Sid. Tom dirties his clothes in a fight and is made to whitewash the fence the next day as punishment. He cleverly persuades his friends to trade him small treasures for the privilege of doing his work. He then trades the treasures for Sunday School tickets which one normally receives for memorizing verses, redeeming them for a Bible, much to the surprise and bewilderment of the superintendent who thought "it was simply preposterous that this boy had warehoused two thousand sheaves of Scriptural wisdom on his premises-a dozen would strain his capacity, without a doubt." Tom falls in love with Becky Thatcher, a new girl in town, and persuades her to get "engaged" by kissing him. But their romance collapses when she learns Tom has been "engaged" previously to Amy Lawrence. Shortly after Becky shuns him, he accompanies Huckleberry Finn to the graveyard at night, where they witness the murder of Dr. Robinson. About the Author After the Civil War, Samuel Clemens (1835-1910) left his small town to seek work as a riverboat pilot. As Mark Twain, the Missouri native found his place in the world. Author, journalist, lecturer, wit, and sage, Twain created enduring works that have enlightened and amused readers of all ages for generations. Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 - April 21, 1910), known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American writer, humorist, entrepreneur, publisher, and lecturer. He was lauded as the "greatest humorist this country has produced", and William Faulkner called him "the father of American literature". His novels include The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884), the latter often called "The Great American Novel". Notable Mark Twain novels includes: NOVELS: The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today (1873) The Prince and the Pauper (1881) A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889) The American Claimant (1892) Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894) Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (1896) A Horse's Tale (1907) TOM SAWYER AND HUCKLEBERRY FINN: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) Tom Sawyer Abroad (1894) Tom Sawyer, Detective (1896) "Schoolhouse Hill" (6 chapters) in The Mysterious Stranger (c.1898, unfinished) "Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer among the Indians" (c. 1884, 9 chapters, unfinished) "Huck Finn" (1903, unfinished) "Tom Sawyer's Conspiracy" (10 chapters, unfinished) "Tom Sawyer's Gang Plans a Naval Battle" (unfinished) SHORT STORIES "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" (1865) "General Washington's Negro Body-Servant" (1868)[4] "Cannibalism in the Cars" (1868) "A Ghost Story" (1870)[6]:176-180 "A True Story, Repeated Word for Word As I Heard It" (1874)[6]:70-73 "Some Learned Fables for Good Old Boys and Girls" (1875)[6]:77-83 "The Story Of The Bad Little Boy" (1875) "The Story Of The Good Little Boy" (1875) "A Murder, a Mystery, and a Marriage" (1876) "Those Extraordinary Twins" (1892) "The Esquimau Maiden's Romance" (1893) "The Million Pound Bank Note" (1893)[6]:226-238 "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg" (1900) "Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven" (1909) "My Platonic Sweetheart" (1912, posthumous) "The Purloining of Prince Oleomargarine"[8] (2017, posthumous)