The Oxford English Literary HistoryThe Oxford English Literary History



The Oxford English Literary History is the twenty-first-century successor to the Oxford History of English Literature, which appeared in fifteen volumes between 1945 and 1997. As in the previous series, each volume offers an individual ...

Author: Laura Ashe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192534446

Category:

Page: 448

View: 947

The Oxford English Literary History is the new century's definitive account of a rich and diverse literary heritage that stretches back for a millennium and more. Each of these thirteen groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age. The series will enlighten and inspire not only everyone studying, teaching, and researching in English Literature, but all serious readers. This book describes and seeks to explain the vast cultural, literary, social, and political transformations which characterized the period 1000-1350. Change can be perceived everywhere at this time. Theology saw the focus shift from God the Father to the suffering Christ, while religious experience became ever more highly charged with emotional affectivity and physical devotion. A new philosophy of interiority turned attention inward, to the exploration of self, and the practice of confession expressed that interior reality with unprecedented importance. The old understanding of penitence as a whole and unrepeatable event, a second baptism, was replaced by a new allowance for repeated repentance and penance, and the possibility of continued purgation of sins after death. The concept of love moved centre stage: in Christ's love as a new explanation for the Passion; in the love of God as the only means of governing the self; and in the appearance of narrative fiction, where heterosexual love was suddenly represented as the goal of secular life. In this mode of writing further emerged the figure of the individual, a unique protagonist bound in social and ethical relation with others; from this came a profound recalibration of moral agency, with reference not only to God but to society. More generally, the social and ethical status of secular lives was drastically elevated by the creation and celebration of courtly and chivalric ideals. In England the ideal of kingship was forged and reforged over these centuries, in intimate relation with native ideals of counsel and consent, bound by the law. In the aftermath of Magna Carta, and as parliament grew in reach and importance, a politics of the public sphere emerged, with a literature to match. These vast transformations have long been observed and documented in their separate fields. The Oxford English Literary History: Volume 1: 1000-1350: Conquest and Transformation offers an account of these changes by which they are all connected, and explicable in terms of one another.

The Oxford English Literary HistoryThe Oxford English Literary History



Hunter, J. Paul, 'Missing Years: On Casualties in English Literary History, Prior to Pope', Common Knowledge, 14 (2008), 434–44. Hunter, J. Paul, 'Who Wrote What? The Question of Attribution', Eighteenth-Century Fiction, 8 (1996), ...

Author: Margaret J. M. Ezell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192537836

Category:

Page:

View: 979

The Oxford English Literary History is the new century's definitive account of a rich and diverse literary heritage that stretches back for a millennium and more. Each of these thirteen groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age. The series will enlighten and inspire not only everyone studying, teaching, and researching in English Literature, but all serious readers. This volume covers the period 1645-1714, and removes the traditional literary period labels and boundaries used in earlier studies to categorize the literary culture of late seventeenth-century England. It invites readers to explore the continuities and the literary innovations occurring during six turbulent decades, as English readers and writers lived through unprecedented events including a King tried and executed by Parliament and another exiled, the creation of the national entity 'Great Britain', and an expanding English awareness of the New World as well as encounters with the cultures of Asia and the subcontinent. The period saw the establishment of new concepts of authorship and it saw a dramatic increase of women working as professional, commercial writers. London theatres closed by law in 1642 reopened with new forms of entertainments from musical theatrical spectaculars to contemporary comedies of manners with celebrity actors and actresses. Emerging literary forms such as epistolary fictions and topical essays were circulated and promoted by new media including newspapers, periodical publications, and advertising and laws were changing governing censorship and taking the initial steps in the development of copyright. It was a period which produced some of the most profound and influential literary expressions of religious faith from John Milton's Paradise Lost and John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, while simultaneously giving rise to a culture of libertinism and savage polemical satire, as well as fostering the new dispassionate discourses of experimental sciences and the conventions of popular romance.

The Modern MovementThe Modern Movement



The Oxford English Literary History is the twenty-first-century successor to the Oxford History of English Literature, which appeared in fifteen volumes between 1945 and 1997. As in the previous series, each volume offers an individual ...

Author: Chris Baldick

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198183105

Category:

Page: 477

View: 138

The Oxford English Literary History is the new century's definitive account of a rich and diverse literary heritage that stretches back for a millennium and more. Each of these groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and the ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age. The series will enlighten and inspire not only everyone studying, teaching, and researching in English Literature, but all serious readers. This exciting new volume provides a freshly inclusive account of literature in England in the period before, during, and after the First World War. Chris Baldick places the modernist achievements of Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, and James Joyce within the rich context of non-modernist writings across all major genres, allowing "high" literary art to be read against the background of "low" entertainment. Looking well beyond the modernist vanguard, Baldick highlights the survival and renewal of realist traditions in these decades of post-Victorian disillusionment. Ranging widely across psychological novels, war poems, detective stories, satires, and children's books, The Modern Movement provides a unique survey of the literature of this turbulent time.

The Oxford English Literary History 1350 1547 reform and cultural revolutionThe Oxford English Literary History 1350 1547 reform and cultural revolution



Leland's enterprise is in part the creation of a timeless literary pantheon that serves royal interests , while Bale seeks to serve the interests of the English Church by constructing its authentic documents .

Author: Donald P and Katherine B Loker Professor of English James Simpson, PH D

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0198182619

Category:

Page: 661

View: 249

Ranging from the extraordinary burst of English literary writing under the reign of Richard II to the literature of the Reformation, this title challenges traditional assumptions and argues that the stylistic diversity enjoyed by late medieval writers was curtailed by the authoritarian practice of the 16th-century cultural revolution.

The Oxford English Literary History 1830 1880 the VictoriansThe Oxford English Literary History 1830 1880 the Victorians



Inaugurating a major new series, successor to the ""Oxford History of English Literature"" but excitingly new in its emphasis on 'literary history', this volume covers the flowering of Victorian literature, from the decade when Tennyson ...

Author: Jonathan Bate

Publisher:

ISBN: 0199269203

Category:

Page: 631

View: 926

The Oxford English Literary History is the new century's definitive account of a rich and diverse literary heritage that stretches back for a millennium and more. Each of these groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age. The series will enlighten and inspire not only everyone studying, teaching, and researching in English Literature, but all serious readers.

The Oxford English Literary History Reform and cultural revolutionThe Oxford English Literary History Reform and cultural revolution



Each of these groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age.

Author: Jonathan Bate

Publisher:

ISBN: LCCN:2002025038

Category:

Page:

View: 125

The Oxford English Literary History is the new century's definitive account of a rich and diverse literary heritage that stretches back for a millennium and more. Each of these groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age. The series will enlighten and inspire not only everyone studying, teaching, and researching in English Literature, but all serious readers.

The Oxford English Literary History Volume 13 1948 2000 The Internationalization of English LiteratureThe Oxford English Literary History Volume 13 1948 2000 The Internationalization of English Literature



In this, the last volume in the Oxford English Literary History, Bruce King discusses the literature written by those who have chosen to make England their home since 1948.

Author: Bruce King

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0199288364

Category:

Page: 400

View: 663

In the future, what will 'English Literary History' mean? A literary history of England, or one with much looser boundaries, defined only by a communality of language, not by location or history? In this, the last volume in the Oxford English Literary History, Bruce King discusses the literature written by those who have chosen to make England their home since 1948. Ranging through Black and Asian British prose, poetry and drama, and writers including V. S. Naipaul, Salman Rushdie, Hanif Kureishi, and Zadie Smith, King reveals the development of the literature from writing about immigration to becoming English. This bold and challenging account of British culture will shape debate for future generations.

The Oxford English Literary History 1910 1940 the modern movementThe Oxford English Literary History 1910 1940 the modern movement



Each of these groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age.

Author: Jonathan Bate

Publisher:

ISBN: LCCN:2002025038

Category:

Page:

View: 660

The Oxford English Literary History is the new century's definitive account of a rich and diverse literary heritage that stretches back for a millennium and more. Each of these groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age. The series will enlighten and inspire not only everyone studying, teaching, and researching in English Literature, but all serious readers.