War and Empire in Mauritius and the Indian OceanWar and Empire in Mauritius and the Indian Ocean



By examining Mauritius and the Indian Ocean, this unique synthesis of imperial and naval/military history, reveals the depths of colonial involvement in the Second World War and the role of colonies in British strategic planning from the ...

Author: A. Jackson

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781403919540

Category:

Page: 241

View: 965

By examining Mauritius and the Indian Ocean, this unique synthesis of imperial and naval/military history, reveals the depths of colonial involvement in the Second World War and the role of colonies in British strategic planning from the eighteenth century. In the century of total war, the British Empire was fully mobilized. The Mauritian home front became regimented, troops were recruited for service overseas, the Eastern fleet guarded the Indian Ocean, and Mauritius became a base for SOE operations and intelligence-gathering for Bletchley.

The Mughal Empire at WarThe Mughal Empire at War



This book argues that, on the contrary, the military establishment built by the Emperor Babur and his successors was highly sophisticated, an effective combination of personnel, expertise, technology and tactics, drawing on precedents from ...

Author: Andrew de la Garza

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317245315

Category:

Page: 210

View: 578

The Mughal Empire was one of the great powers of the early modern era, ruling almost all of South Asia, a conquest state, dominated by its military elite. Many historians have viewed the Mughal Empire as relatively backward, the Emperor the head of a traditional warband from Central Asia, with tribalism and the traditions of the Islamic world to the fore, and the Empire not remotely comparable to the forward looking Western European states of the period, with their strong innovative armies implementing the “military revolution”. This book argues that, on the contrary, the military establishment built by the Emperor Babur and his successors was highly sophisticated, an effective combination of personnel, expertise, technology and tactics, drawing on precedents from Europe, the Middle East, Central Asia and India, and that the resulting combined arms system transformed the conduct of warfare in South Asia. The book traces the development of the Mughal Empire chronologically, examines weapons and technology, tactics and operations, organization, recruitment and training, and logistics and non-combat operations, and concludes by assessing the overall achievements of the Mughal Empire, comparing it to its Western counterparts, and analyzing the reasons for its decline.

India Empire and First World War CultureIndia Empire and First World War Culture



This is the first cultural and literary history of India and the First World War, with archival research from Europe and South Asia.

Author: Santanu Das

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107081581

Category:

Page: 300

View: 181

This is the first cultural and literary history of India and the First World War, with archival research from Europe and South Asia.

The Indian Empire At WarThe Indian Empire At War



To start its story, it is essential to go back to the eve of the First World War to get the measure of the pre-war Indian Army. For this alone provided the Indian troops that served at the war's fronts into mid-1915 before the first ...

Author: George Morton-Jack

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781408707722

Category:

Page: 592

View: 777

'Essential to a proper understanding of the war and of our world of today' Michael Morpurgo 1.5 million Indians fought with the British in the First World War - from Flanders to the African bush and the deserts of the Islamic world, they saved the Allies from defeat in 1914 and were vital to global victory in 1918. Using previously unpublished veteran interviews, this is their story, told as never before.

The British Empire and the First World WarThe British Empire and the First World War



The chapters in this volume were originally published in Australian Historical Studies, The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, First World War Studies or The Round Table: The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs.

Author: Ashley Jackson

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781317374657

Category:

Page: 480

View: 253

The British Empire played a crucial part in the First World War, supplying hundreds of thousands of soldiers and labourers as well as a range of essential resources, from foodstuffs to minerals, mules, and munitions. In turn, many imperial territories were deeply affected by wartime phenomena, such as inflation, food shortages, combat, and the presence of large numbers of foreign troops. This collection offers a comprehensive selection of essays illuminating the extent of the Empire’s war contribution and experience, and the richness of scholarly research on the subject. Whether supporting British military operations, aiding the British imperial economy, or experiencing significant wartime effects on the home fronts of the Empire, the war had a profound impact on the colonies and their people. The chapters in this volume were originally published in Australian Historical Studies, The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, First World War Studies or The Round Table: The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs.

Army of EmpireArmy of Empire



Drawing on freshly uncovered interviews with members of the Indian Army in Iraq and elsewhere, historian George Morton-Jack paints a deeply human story of courage, colonization, and racism, and finally gives these men their rightful place ...

Author: George Morton-Jack

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 9780465094073

Category:

Page: 609

View: 885

Drawing on untapped new sources, the first global history of the Indian Expeditionary Forces in World War I While their story is almost always overlooked, the 1.5 million Indian soldiers who served the British Empire in World War I played a crucial role in the eventual Allied victory. Despite their sacrifices, Indian troops received mixed reactions from their allies and their enemies alike-some were treated as liberating heroes, some as mercenaries and conquerors themselves, and all as racial inferiors and a threat to white supremacy. Yet even as they fought as imperial troops under the British flag, their broadened horizons fired in them new hopes of racial equality and freedom on the path to Indian independence. Drawing on freshly uncovered interviews with members of the Indian Army in Iraq and elsewhere, historian George Morton-Jack paints a deeply human story of courage, colonization, and racism, and finally gives these men their rightful place in history.

Soldiers of EmpireSoldiers of Empire



This book will appeal to those interested in the Second World War, armed forces and the British Empire, and students and scholars of military sociology and history, South Asian studies and international relations.

Author: Tarak Barkawi

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316620654

Category:

Page: 338

View: 264

How are soldiers made? Why do they fight? Re-imagining the study of armed forces and society, Barkawi examines the imperial and multinational armies that fought in Asia in the Second World War, especially the British Indian army in the Burma campaign. Going beyond conventional narratives, Barkawi studies soldiers in transnational context, from recruitment and training to combat and memory. Drawing on history, sociology and anthropology, the book critiques the 'Western way of war' from a postcolonial perspective. Barkawi reconceives soldiers as cosmopolitan, their battles irreducible to the national histories that monopolise them. This book will appeal to those interested in the Second World War, armed forces and the British Empire, and students and scholars of military sociology and history, South Asian studies and international relations.

Forgotten ArmiesForgotten Armies



In the early stages of the Second World War, the vast crescent of British-ruled territories stretching from India to Singapore appeared as a massive Allied asset.

Author: Christopher Alan Bayly

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 067401748X

Category:

Page: 555

View: 681

In the early stages of the Second World War, the vast crescent of British-ruled territories stretching from India to Singapore appeared as a massive Allied asset. It provided scores of soldiers and great quantities of raw materials and helped present a seemingly impregnable global defense against the Axis. Yet, within a few weeks in 1941-42, a Japanese invasion had destroyed all this, sweeping suddenly and decisively through south and southeast Asia to the Indian frontier, and provoking the extraordinary revolutionary struggles which would mark the beginning of the end of British dominion in the East and the rise of today's Asian world. More than a military history, this gripping account of groundbreaking battles and guerrilla campaigns creates a panoramic view of British Asia as it was ravaged by warfare, nationalist insurgency, disease, and famine. It breathes life into the armies of soldiers, civilians, laborers, businessmen, comfort women, doctors, and nurses who confronted the daily brutalities of a combat zone which extended from metropolitan cities to remote jungles, from tropical plantations to the Himalayas. Drawing upon a vast range of Indian, Burmese, Chinese, and Malay as well as British, American, and Japanese voices, the authors make vivid one of the central dramas of the twentieth century: the birth of modern south and southeast Asia and the death of British rule.

The Far Reaches of EmpireThe Far Reaches of Empire



The Far Reaches of Empire chronicles the half century of Anglo-American efforts to establish dominion in Nova Scotia, an important French foothold in the New World.

Author: John Grenier

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806185668

Category:

Page: 288

View: 833

The Far Reaches of Empire chronicles the half century of Anglo-American efforts to establish dominion in Nova Scotia, an important French foothold in the New World. John Grenier examines the conflict of cultures and peoples in the colonial Northeast through the lens of military history as he tells how Britons and Yankees waged a tremendously efficient counterinsurgency that ultimately crushed every remnant of Acadian, Indian, and French resistance in Nova Scotia. The author demonstrates the importance of warfare in the Anglo-French competition for North America, showing especially how Anglo-Americans used brutal but effective measures to wrest control of Nova Scotia from French and Indian enemies who were no less ruthless. He explores the influence of Abenakis, Maliseets, and Mi’kmaq in shaping the region’s history, revealing them to be more than the supposed pawns of outsiders; and he describes the machinations of French officials, military officers, and Catholic priests in stirring up resistance. Arguing that the Acadians were not merely helpless victims of ethnic cleansing, Grenier shows that individual actions and larger forces of history influenced the decision to remove them. The Far Reaches of Empire illuminates the primacy of war in establishing British supremacy in northeastern North America.

The Kashmir ConflictThe Kashmir Conflict



This book presents a study of the international dimensions of the Kashmir dispute between India and Pakistan from before its outbreak in October 1947 until the Tashkent Summit in January 1966.

Author: Rakesh Ankit

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317225256

Category:

Page: 250

View: 467

This book presents a study of the international dimensions of the Kashmir dispute between India and Pakistan from before its outbreak in October 1947 until the Tashkent Summit in January 1966. By focusing on Kashmir’s under-researched transnational dimensions, it represents a different approach to this intractable territorial conflict. Concentrating on the global context(s) in which the dispute unfolded, it argues that the dispute’s evolution was determined by international concerns that existed from before and went beyond the Indian subcontinent. Based on new and diverse official and personal papers across four countries, the book foregrounds the Kashmir dispute in a twin setting of Decolonisation and the Cold War, and investigates the international understanding around it within the imperatives of these two processes. In doing so, it traces Kashmir’s journey from being a residual irritant of the British Indian Empire, to becoming a Commonwealth embarrassment and its eventual metamorphosis into a security concern in the Cold War climate(s). A princely state of exceptional geo-strategic location, complex religious composition and unique significance in the context of Indian and Pakistani notions of nation and statehood, Kashmir also complicated their relations with Britain, the United States, Soviet Union, China, the Commonwealth countries and the Afro-Arab-Asian world. This book is of interest to scholars in the field of Asian History, Cold War History, Decolonisation and South Asian Studies.

Indian Army List January 1919 Volume 1Indian Army List January 1919 Volume 1



This splendid four-volume work reflects the tremendous contribution made by the Indian Army to the Empire’s war effort. A full index is included.

Author: Army Headquarters, India

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN: 9781781502556

Category:

Page: 505

View: 685

Volume 1 of 4. The January and July issues of the Indian Army List contain not only the distribution of officers on the active list of the Army in India, including officers of British army regiments, battalions etc stationed in India, but are supplemented by the addition of Orders of Knighthood, Honours and Awards, including Foreign Orders, by the non-effective officer list and the War Services of officers of the Indian Army. Details of each officer include dates of birth (except for wartime commissioned officers), date of first commission, of appointment to the Indian Army and dates of promotion. Officers are grouped according to their rank and by seniority within that rank, and are again shown under their regiments/battalions. In the case of British units, their date of arrival in India is shown, and with Indian units their date of formation and changes in title since, plus details of the backgrounds of men recruited, e.g. Sikhs, Punjabis, Dogras, Rajputs, etc. This army list also includes all native Viceroy Commissioned Officers - Subadar Majors, Subadars and Jemadars - and their war services, Major HQs and their staffs, divisional and brigade commanders and their staffs, schools, colleges, Administrative Departments of the Army are all shown. Non-regular Indian Defence Force units such as 22nd Bengal and North-Western railway Battalion, and the Indian Army Reserve of Officers are all there, along with British Warrant Officers serving in departments of the Indian Army. In 1914 there were 116 Indian and 10 Gurkha Regiments, all with one battalion apart from the cavalry, 32 Indian and one Gurkha regiment had been formed and the majority of the original regiments had raised second and sometimes third battalions. This splendid four-volume work reflects the tremendous contribution made by the Indian Army to the Empire’s war effort. A full index is included.

Indian Soldiers in World War IIndian Soldiers in World War I



In Indian Soldiers in World War I Andrew T. Jarboe follows these Indian soldiers--or sepoys--across the battlefields, examining the contested representations British and Indian audiences drew from the soldiers' wartime experiences and the ...

Author: Andrew T. Jarboe

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9781496227171

Category:

Page: 342

View: 689

More than one million Indian soldiers were deployed during World War I, serving in the Indian Army as part of Britain's imperial war effort. These men fought in France and Belgium, Egypt and East Africa, and Gallipoli, Palestine, and Mesopotamia. In Indian Soldiers in World War I Andrew T. Jarboe follows these Indian soldiers--or sepoys--across the battlefields, examining the contested representations British and Indian audiences drew from the soldiers' wartime experiences and the impacts these representations had on the British Empire's racial politics. Presenting overlooked or forgotten connections, Jarboe argues that Indian soldiers' presence on battlefields across three continents contributed decisively to the British Empire's final victory in the war. While the war and Indian soldiers' involvement led to a hardening of the British Empire's prewar racist ideologies and governing policies, the battlefield contributions of Indian soldiers fueled Indian national aspirations and calls for racial equality. When Indian soldiers participated in the brutal suppression of anti-government demonstrations in India at war's end, they set the stage for the eventual end of British rule in South Asia.

Hungry Bengal War Famine and the End of EmpireHungry Bengal War Famine and the End of Empire



The years leading up to the independence and accompanying partition of India mark a tumultuous period in the history of Bengal.

Author: Janam Mukherjee

Publisher: Harper India

ISBN: 9351775828

Category:

Page: 344

View: 385

The years leading up to the independence and accompanying partition of India mark a tumultuous period in the history of Bengal. While for the British the priority was to save the empire from imminent collapse, for the majority of the Indian population the 1940s were years of acute scarcity, violent dislocation and enduring calamity. In particular, there are three major crises that shaped the social, economic and political context of pre-partition Bengal: the Second World War, the Bengal famine of 1943, and the Calcutta riots of 1946. Hungry Bengal examines these intricately interconnected events, foregrounding the political economy of war and famine in order to analyse the complex nexus of hunger, war and civil violence in colonial Bengal at the twilight of British rule.

India s WarIndia s War



Many more were pulled into the vortex of wartime mobilization. Srinath Raghavan's compelling and original book gives both a surprising new account of the fighting and of life on the home front.

Author: Srinath Raghavan

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 9781846145438

Category:

Page: 576

View: 977

Between 1939 and 1945 India changed to an extraordinary extent. Millions of Indians suddenly found themselves as soldiers, fighting in Europe and North Africa but also - something simply never imagined - against a Japanese army threatening to invade eastern India. Many more were pulled into the vortex of wartime mobilization. Srinath Raghavan's compelling and original book gives both a surprising new account of the fighting and of life on the home front. For Indian nationalists the war has tended to be seen as a distraction from the quest for national independence - but Raghavan shows that in fact the war lay at the very heart of how and why colonial rule ended in South Asia. By seeing the Second World War through Indian eyes, Raghavan transforms our understanding of the conflict - with famous battles such as those in North Africa and Iraq reinterpreted, as well as fascinating and little known campaigns such as the destruction of Italian northeast Africa. Time and again, it was Indian troops that made Britain into a global power and, as the war came to an end, it was the Indian army that fought the final battles which marked the end both of the Japanese empire, and of the British.