The Huguenots and French Opinion 1685 1787The Huguenots and French Opinion 1685 1787



The decision of Louis XIV to revoke the Edict of Nantes and thus liquidate French Calvinism was well received in the intellectual community which was deeply prejudiced against the Huguenots.

Author: Geoffrey Adams

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier University Press

ISBN: 0889202176

Category:

Page: 349

View: 407

The decision of Louis XIV to revoke the Edict of Nantes and thus liquidate French Calvinism was well received in the intellectual community which was deeply prejudiced against the Huguenots. This antipathy would gradually disappear. After the death of the Sun King, a more sympathetic view of the Protestant minority was presented to French readers by leading thinkers such as Montesquieu, the abbé Prévost, and Voltaire. By the middle years of the eighteenth century, liberal clerics, lawyers, and government ministers joined Encyclopedists in urging the emancipation of the Reformed who were seen to be loyal, peaceable and productive. Then, in 1787, thanks to intensive lobbying by a group which included Malesherbes, Lafayette, and the future revolutionary Rabaut Saint-Étienne, the government of Louis XVI issued an edict of toleration which granted the Huguenots a modest bill of civil and religious rights. Adams’ illuminating work treats a major chapter in the history of toleration; it explores in depth a fascinating shift in mentalités, and it offers a new focus on the process of “reform from above” in pre-Revolutionary France.

The Huguenots and French Opinion 1685 1787The Huguenots and French Opinion 1685 1787



The decision of Louis XIV to revoke the Edict of Nantes and thus liquidate French Calvinism was well received in the intellectual community which was deeply prejudiced against the Huguenots.

Author: Geoffrey Adams

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 9780889202092

Category:

Page: 335

View: 437

The decision of Louis XIV to revoke the Edict of Nantes and thus liquidate French Calvinism was well received in the intellectual community which was deeply prejudiced against the Huguenots. This antipathy would gradually disappear. After the death of the Sun King, a more sympathetic view of the Protestant minority was presented to French readers by leading thinkers such as Montesquieu, the abbé Prévost, and Voltaire. By the middle years of the eighteenth century, liberal clerics, lawyers, and government ministers joined Encyclopedists in urging the emancipation of the Reformed who were seen to be loyal, peaceable and productive. Then, in 1787, thanks to intensive lobbying by a group which included Malesherbes, Lafayette, and the future revolutionary Rabaut Saint-Étienne, the government of Louis XVI issued an edict of toleration which granted the Huguenots a modest bill of civil and religious rights. Adams’ illuminating work treats a major chapter in the history of toleration; it explores in depth a fascinating shift in mentalités, and it offers a new focus on the process of “reform from above” in pre-Revolutionary France.

The Huguenots and French Opinion 1685 1787The Huguenots and French Opinion 1685 1787



part of Louis XIV in 1685; among other horrors, the forcible abduction of children, the dragging of the remains of non-conformists over the ground, the execution of Calas. Recent developments, however, promised an end to this ...

Author: Geoffrey Adams

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 9780889209046

Category:

Page: 336

View: 608

The decision of Louis XIV to revoke the Edict of Nantes and thus liquidate French Calvinism was well received in the intellectual community which was deeply prejudiced against the Huguenots. This antipathy would gradually disappear. After the death of the Sun King, a more sympathetic view of the Protestant minority was presented to French readers by leading thinkers such as Montesquieu, the abbé Prévost, and Voltaire. By the middle years of the eighteenth century, liberal clerics, lawyers, and government ministers joined Encyclopedists in urging the emancipation of the Reformed who were seen to be loyal, peaceable and productive. Then, in 1787, thanks to intensive lobbying by a group which included Malesherbes, Lafayette, and the future revolutionary Rabaut Saint-Étienne, the government of Louis XVI issued an edict of toleration which granted the Huguenots a modest bill of civil and religious rights. Adams’ illuminating work treats a major chapter in the history of toleration; it explores in depth a fascinating shift in mentalités, and it offers a new focus on the process of “reform from above” in pre-Revolutionary France.

The Call of ConscienceThe Call of Conscience



Based on painstaking research and solid scholarship, The Call of Conscience: French Protestant Responses to the Algeria War, 1954-1962 reveals a rich portrait of the protest.

Author: Geoffrey Adams

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 9780889209053

Category:

Page: 296

View: 348

Initially, when the government in Paris responded with force to the November 1, 1954 insurrection of Algerian nationalists, French public opinion offered all but unanimous support. Then it was revealed that hundreds of thousands of Muslims were herded into resettlement camps in Algeria; that Algerians suspected of nationalist sympathies were imprisoned in France; that conscientious objectors were denied their rights; and that a resolution to the conflict, either by force or by peaceful methods, was not forthcoming. When it was proven that the army was guilty of abuses, members of the Protestant minority protested and then laboured to educate their own communities as well as the public at large to the moral and spiritual perils of these actions. Based on painstaking research and solid scholarship, The Call of Conscience: French Protestant Responses to the Algeria War, 1954-1962 reveals a rich portrait of the protest.

The French Revolution and Religion in Global PerspectiveThe French Revolution and Religion in Global Perspective



... 1977); Geoffrey Adams, The Huguenots and French Opinion, 16851787 (Waterloo: Wilfred Laurier University Press, 1991). Suzanne Desan, “Transatlantic Spaces of Revolution: The French Revolution, Sciotomanie, and American Lands,” in ...

Author: Bryan A. Banks

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319596839

Category:

Page: 232

View: 976

This volume examines the French Revolution’s relationship with and impact on religious communities and religion in a transnational perspective. It challenges the traditional secular narrative of the French Revolution, exploring religious experience and representation during the Revolution, as well as the religious legacies that spanned from the eighteenth century to the present. Contributors explore the myriad ways that individuals, communities, and nation-states reshaped religion in France, Europe, the Atlantic Ocean, and around the world.

Political EcumenismPolitical Ecumenism



In an epilogue, Adams reflects on the impact of Free France's political ecumenism in the postwar era.

Author: Geoffrey Adams

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773576667

Category:

Page: 432

View: 111

Adams examines the contributions of such major Français libres as René Cassin, Pierre Mendès France, and Jacques Soustelle and explores de Gaulle's troubled relations with Churchill and Roosevelt. The opportunity for Gaullists to offer full membership to the fourth religious family, Algeria's Muslim majority, following the liberation of French North Africa is also considered. In an epilogue, Adams reflects on the impact of Free France's political ecumenism in the postwar era.

The Huguenots of Paris and the Coming of Religious Freedom 1685 1789The Huguenots of Paris and the Coming of Religious Freedom 1685 1789



SECONDARY SOURCES Adams, Geoffrey, The Huguenots and French Opinion, 16851787. The Enlightenment Debate on Toleration (Waterloo, Ontario:Wilfred Laurier University Press, 1991). Armogathe, Jean-Robert, Croire en liberté.

Author: David Garrioch

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107047679

Category:

Page: 296

View: 385

This book investigates the reasons why the Catholic population of Paris increasingly tolerated the minority Protestant Huguenot population between 1685 and 1789.

Toleration in Enlightenment EuropeToleration in Enlightenment Europe



This long-awaited edict proved to be a half-measure for France's Protestant community, and it failed to end the debate which ... 2 G. Adams, The Huguenots and French Opinion, 16851787: the Enlightenment Debate on Toleration, Waterloo, ...

Author: Ole Peter Grell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521651967

Category:

Page: 270

View: 332

This 1999 book is a systematic pan-European survey of the theory, practice, and very real limits to toleration in eighteenth-century Europe.

The Wives of Western PhilosophyThe Wives of Western Philosophy



35 Keith Michael Baker, “Public Opinion as Political Invention,” in Inventing the French Revolution (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990), 167–202. 36 Geoffrey Adams, The Huguenots and French Opinion, 16851787: The ...

Author: Jennifer Forestal

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000283402

Category:

Page: 204

View: 229

The Wives of Western Philosophy examines the lives and experiences of the wives and women associated with nine distinct political thinkers—from Socrates to Marx—in order to explore the gendered patterns of intellectual labor that permeate the foundations of Western political thought. Organized chronologically and representative of three eras in the history of political thought (Ancient, Early Modern, and Modern), nine critical biographical chapters explore the everyday acts of intellectual labor and partnership involving these "wives of the canon." Taking seriously their narratives as intimate partners reveals that wives have labored in remarkable ways throughout the history of political thought. In some cases, their labors mark the conceptual boundaries of political life; in others, they serve as uncredited resources for the production of political ideas. In all instances, however, these wives and intimates are pushed to the margins of the history of political thought. The Wives of Western Philosophy brings these women to the center of scholarly interest. In so doing, it provides new insights into the intellectual biographies of some of the most famed men in political theory while also raising important questions about the gendered politics of intellectual labor which shape our receptions of canonical texts and thinkers, and which sustain the academy even today.

Radicalism and Dissent in the World of Protestant ReformRadicalism and Dissent in the World of Protestant Reform



The Recognition of French Quakers on the Eve of the French Revolution Although Marcillac was the mastermind of the ... Geoffrey Adams, The Huguenots and French Opinion, 16851787: The Enlightenment Debate on Toleration (Waterloo, Ont., ...

Author: VolkswagenStiftung

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN: 9783647552583

Category:

Page: 277

View: 189

This volume of essays explores the themes of radicalism and dissent within Protestantism. The comparisons highlight the contingent nature of particular settlements and narratives, and reveal the extent to which the definition of religious radicalism was dependent upon immediate context and show that radicalism and dissent were truly transnational phenomena. The historiography of the so-called radical reformation has been unduly shaped by the hostile categories imposed by mainstream or magisterial reformers during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This volume argues that scholars should adopt an open-ended understanding of evangelical reform, and recognize that the boundaries between radicalism and its opposite were not always firmly drawn. The distinction between the two is an inheritance of the Lutheran Reformation of the 1520s, which shaped not only the later course of the Reformation in the Holy Roman Empire but also attitudes towards and writings on religious dissent in the Netherlands and England. Radical critique is immanent within mainstream Protestantism, in a faith that emphasizes the power of the gospel with its unrelenting demands.