The Hill StationThe Hill Station



And for the Bishop of Simla, rainclouds are not the only storms on the horizon. The Hill Station is the novel on which J.G. Farrell was working at the time of his tragically early accidental death.

Author: J.G. Farrell

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780297866206

Category:

Page: 256

View: 146

A classic novel by a Booker Prize-winning author To the cool of the Simla hills comes a reluctant Dr McNab, with his wife and young niece. For Emily, romance is in the air. For the mysterious Mrs Forester, there is scandal brewing. And for the Bishop of Simla, rainclouds are not the only storms on the horizon. The Hill Station is the novel on which J.G. Farrell was working at the time of his tragically early accidental death. It demonstrates powerfully what a great loss to world literature this was.

The Hill Station and an Indian DiaryThe Hill Station and an Indian Diary



A classic novel by a Booker Prize-winning author

Author: James Gordon Farrell

Publisher:

ISBN: 1857990862

Category:

Page: 254

View: 233

A classic novel by a Booker Prize-winning author To the cool of the Simla hills comes a reluctant Dr McNab, with his wife and young niece. For Emily, romance is in the air. For the mysterious Mrs Forester, there is scandal brewing. And for the Bishop of Simla, rainclouds are not the only storms on the horizon. The Hill Station is the novel on which J.G. Farrell was working at the time of his tragically early accidental death. It demonstrates powerfully what a great loss to world literature this was.

The Magic MountainsThe Magic Mountains



For all its hyperbole , this image of the hill station was in certain crucial respects
an accurate one . Above all , it conveyed the fact that hill stations sought to isolate
their seasonal residents from India's harsher features , to offer them a comforting
 ...

Author: Dane Keith Kennedy

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520201884

Category:

Page: 264

View: 299

Perched among peaks that loom over heat-shimmering plains, hill stations remain among the most curious monuments to the British colonial presence in India. In this engaging and meticulously researched study, Dane Kennedy explores the development and history of the hill stations of the raj. He shows that these cloud-enshrouded havens were sites of both refuge and surveillance for British expatriates: sanctuaries from the harsh climate as well as an alien culture; artificial environments where colonial rulers could nurture, educate, and reproduce themselves; commanding heights from which orders could be issued with an Olympian authority. Kennedy charts the symbolic and sociopolitical functions of the hill stations over the course of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, arguing that these highland communities became much more significant to the British colonial government than mere places for rest and play. Particularly after the revolt of 1857, they became headquarters for colonial political and military authorities. In addition, the hill stations provided employment to countless Indians who worked as porters, merchants, government clerks, domestics, and carpenters. The isolation of British authorities at the hill stations reflected the paradoxical character of the British raj itself, Kennedy argues. While attempting to control its subjects, it remained aloof from Indian society. Ironically, as more Indians were drawn to these mountain areas for work, and later for vacation, the carefully guarded boundaries between the British and their subjects eroded. Kennedy argues that after the turn of the century, the hill stations were increasingly incorporated into the landscape of Indian social and cultural life. Perched among peaks that loom over heat-shimmering plains, hill stations remain among the most curious monuments to the British colonial presence in India. In this engaging and meticulously researched study, Dane Kennedy explores the development and history of the hill stations of the raj. He shows that these cloud-enshrouded havens were sites of both refuge and surveillance for British expatriates: sanctuaries from the harsh climate as well as an alien culture; artificial environments where colonial rulers could nurture, educate, and reproduce themselves; commanding heights from which orders could be issued with an Olympian authority. Kennedy charts the symbolic and sociopolitical functions of the hill stations over the course of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, arguing that these highland communities became much more significant to the British colonial government than mere places for rest and play. Particularly after the revolt of 1857, they became headquarters for colonial political and military authorities. In addition, the hill stations provided employment to countless Indians who worked as porters, merchants, government clerks, domestics, and carpenters. The isolation of British authorities at the hill stations reflected the paradoxical character of the British raj itself, Kennedy argues. While attempting to control its subjects, it remained aloof from Indian society. Ironically, as more Indians were drawn to these mountain areas for work, and later for vacation, the carefully guarded boundaries between the British and their subjects eroded. Kennedy argues that after the turn of the century, the hill stations were increasingly incorporated into the landscape of Indian social and cultural life.

Account of the Operations of the Great Trigonometrical Survey of IndiaAccount of the Operations of the Great Trigonometrical Survey of India



Baniájorí Hill Station , lat . 21 ° 26 ' , long . 86 ° 6 ' — observed at in 1854 and
1855 - is situated in a wild and hilly tract in the Keonjhar tributary estate , about
1.5 miles S.W. of the little village of Baniájorí , which has been deserted on
account ...

Author: Survey of India. Trigonometrical Branch

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015086727719

Category:

Page:

View: 682

Synopsis of the Results of the OperationsSynopsis of the Results of the Operations



Karanja Hill Station , lat . 18 ° 51 ' , long . 72 ° 59'— observed at in 1839 and
1842 — is situated on the highest part of the southern and higher of two hills on
the island of Uran about 6 miles S. E. of Bombay . The hill is locally called
Dronagiri ...

Author: India. Great Trigonometrical Survey

Publisher:

ISBN: COLUMBIA:CU04612108

Category:

Page:

View: 568