The Coast WatchersThe Coast Watchers



After Pearl Harbor, Japan swept unchecked through the Pacific. But a tiny band of brave men stayed behind the enemy lines. Aided by loyal islanders, they watched and they warned. They were the Coast Watchers.

Author: Patrick Lindsay

Publisher:

ISBN: 1741669243

Category:

Page: 416

View: 731

After Pearl Harbor, Japan swept unchecked through the Pacific. But a tiny band of brave men stayed behind the enemy lines. Aided by loyal islanders, they watched and they warned. They were the Coast Watchers. They saved countless lives - including that of future US President John F. Kennedy - and they changed the course of the Pacific War. They knew capture meant certain execution but, while the Japanese hunted them, they moved and hid in the jungle, taking their cumbersome teleradios with them (equipment that took more than a dozen men to transport). They warned of Japanese air strikes, reported on the movements of their shipping and troops, and saved scores of downed airmen. Their reports gave vital warning time to the Allies and allowed them to take a decisive toll on the enemy. The famed American admiral, William 'Bull' Halsey summed it up: 'Guadalcanal saved the Pacific, and the Coast Watchers saved Guadalcanal.'

The Coast WatchersThe Coast Watchers



After Pearl Harbor, Japan swept unchecked through the Pacific. But a tiny band of brave men stayed behind the enemy lines. Aided by loyal islanders, they watched and they warned. They were the Coast Watchers.

Author: Patrick Lindsay

Publisher: Random House Australia

ISBN: 9781742741741

Category:

Page: 432

View: 144

After Pearl Harbor, Japan swept unchecked through the Pacific but a tiny band of brave men stayed behind the enemy lines and they watched and they warned: They were the Coast Watchers. After Pearl Harbor, Japan swept unchecked through the Pacific. But a tiny band of brave men stayed behind the enemy lines. Aided by loyal islanders, they watched and they warned. They were the Coast Watchers. They saved countless lives - including that of future US President John F. Kennedy - and they changed the course of the Pacific War. They knew capture meant certain execution but, while the Japanese hunted them, they moved and hid in the jungle, taking their cumbersome teleradios with them (equipment that took more than a dozen men to transport). They warned of Japanese air strikes, reported on the movements of their shipping and troops, and saved scores of downed airmen. Their reports gave vital warning time to the Allies and allowed them to take a decisive toll on the enemy. The famed American admiral, William 'Bull' Halsey summed it up: ‘Guadalcanal saved the Pacific, and the Coast Watchers saved Guadalcanal.’

Death of a Coast WatcherDeath of a Coast Watcher



You know that's what we called the coast watchers? After Disney's pacifist bull, which would rather sniff flowers than brawl. Gather intelligence, avoid direct combat. “Rand objected to calling dead soldiers 'the fallen', ...

Author: Anthony English

Publisher: Monsoon Books

ISBN: 9781912049714

Category:

Page: 464

View: 434

In 1943 on Bougainville Island, New Guinea, a Japanese officer beheads Hugh Rand, an Australian spy — a coast watcher. The spectators include villagers he terrorised as his mind frayed under the stress of pursuit by soldiers and their hounds. Rand’s influence transcends his death. For decades he plagues characters who strive to cope with him and one another in New Guinea, the Gilbert Islands, Australia and Japan. Who misperceives? Lies? Self-destructs? Suffers? Loves? The layers unfold as the author entices us through cultural, historical and intellectual curtains, deep into minds and relationships disturbed by the Pacific war and Rand’s legacy.

Imperial Japan s Allied Prisoners of War in the South PacificImperial Japan s Allied Prisoners of War in the South Pacific



Australia's famous coast watchers began as an Australian government civil defense organization after the end of World War I to keep Melbourne informed of important developments along Australia's coast. By the late 1920s it had expanded ...

Author: C. Kenneth Quinones

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781527575462

Category:

Page: 675

View: 618

Three weeks after Imperial Japan’s surrender, five men dressed in baggy khaki uniforms stared at the camera. They and two colleagues were the only survivors out of the 210 Allied airmen which Imperial Japan had imprisoned in “paradise.” Joining them were 18 British soldiers, the only survivors of 600 of their countrymen similarly but separately imprisoned. Another 10,000 Allied soldiers and civilians were also imprisoned on the South Pacific island of New Britain. More than half died before liberation. What motivated such inhumane treatment? This book’s quest for an answer traces the genesis of Bushido, Imperial Japan’s martial code, and surveys the prisoners’ recollections of their ordeal as the Battle for Rabaul raged around them from 1942 to March 1944.

Right Man Right Place Worst TimeRight Man Right Place Worst Time



US Fleet Admiral Halsey told a gathering of the Australian-American Association, ‘I could get down on my knees every night and thank God for Commander Eric Feldt.’ This is the story of Eric Feldt and his Coastwatchers.

Author: Betty Lee

Publisher: Boolarong Press

ISBN: 9781925877267

Category:

Page: 330

View: 645

In May 1939, Australia’s Naval Intelligence had the foresight to set up a network of men located on various islands north of Australia to report on suspicious shipping movements near their coast. Only one man was considered ideal for commanding this top secret mission — Eric Feldt. Feldt was given the title Staff Officer Intelligence in Port Moresby. His task — recruit the civilian volunteers to be Coastwatchers. When war came to the Pacific these men were critical to the security of Australia and the US South Pacific Fleet. US Fleet Admiral Halsey told a gathering of the Australian-American Association, ‘I could get down on my knees every night and thank God for Commander Eric Feldt.’ This is the story of Eric Feldt and his Coastwatchers.

Royal Australian Navy MacArthurRoyal Australian Navy MacArthur



impediment to future Coast Watcher operations was underlined; until the New Guinea natives could see that Japanese claims to have eliminated the white man were greatly exaggerated, no Coast Watcher party could operate safely amongst ...

Author: Ian Pfennigwerth

Publisher: Rosenberg Publishing

ISBN: 9781922013217

Category:

Page: 209

View: 171

By 1945, General MacArthur’s forces had advanced from Papua to the Philippines and to Borneo. The vast majority of the troops, supplies, and equipment for this campaign were transported by sea, and MacArthur’s success was based on 22 amphibious assaults. Soldiers and Marines did the ground fighting and MacArthur’s air forces eventually ruled the skies, but it was the ships of the United States and Australian navies that delivered them to the battlefronts and supported them. This book reveals facts of the Royal Australian Navy’s crucial role in World War II.

That Neutral IslandThat Neutral Island



The coast - watchers ' task was to monitor the borders of the Irish State to be alert to infringements of the integrity of the state not only from the sea but also from the air . However , despite the symbolic importance of the coast ...

Author: Clair Wills

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674026829

Category:

Page: 499

View: 652

When the world descended into war in 1939, a few European countries remained neutral, and few states were more controversial than Ireland. This book takes in the full breadth of the Irish wartime experience, describing a pivotal moment in the history of Anglo-Irish relations.