A History of Catholic AntisemitismA History of Catholic Antisemitism



However, as Robert Michael shows in this comprehensive study, the Church’s involvement in the history of antisemitism goes back to its founding and to the essence of the Christian Scriptures.

Author: Robert Michael

Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan

ISBN: UOM:39015073942321

Category:

Page: 302

View: 718

In recent years, the Catholic Church has come under censure for its inaction during the Holocaust and for its similar passivity in the face of contemporary antisemitism. However, as Robert Michael shows in this comprehensive study, the Church’s involvement in the history of antisemitism goes back to its founding and to the essence of the Christian Scriptures. Moving from the Church’s origins, through the Roman era, Middle Ages, and Reformation to the present, Michael here provides a definitive history of Catholic antisemitism. .

The Catholic Church and AntisemitismThe Catholic Church and Antisemitism



This book examines how, following Vatican policy, Polish church leaders resisted separation of church and state in the name of Catholic culture.

Author: Ronald Modras

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1138176834

Category:

Page: 448

View: 845

This book examines how, following Vatican policy, Polish church leaders resisted separation of church and state in the name of Catholic culture. In that struggle, every assimilated Jew served as both a symbol and a potential agent of security.

Church nation and raceChurch nation and race



This book is a political history of ideas that introduces Catholic views of modern society, race, nation and the ‘Jewish question’. It shows to what extent these views were able to inform political and social activity.

Author: Ulrike Ehret

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781847797407

Category:

Page: 328

View: 438

Church, nation and race compares the worldviews and factors that promoted or, indeed, opposed antisemitism amongst Catholics in Germany and England after the First World War. As a prequel to books on Hitler, fascism and genocide, the book turns towards ideas and attitudes that preceded and shaped the ideologies of the 1920s and 1940s. Apart from the long tradition of Catholic anti-Jewish prejudices, the book discusses new and old alternatives to European modernity offered by Catholics in Germany and England. This book is a political history of ideas that introduces Catholic views of modern society, race, nation and the ‘Jewish question’. It shows to what extent these views were able to inform political and social activity. Church, nation and race will interest academics and students of antisemitism, European history, German and British history.

The Holocaust the Church and the Law of Unintended ConsequencesThe Holocaust the Church and the Law of Unintended Consequences



In this study, author Anthony J. Sciolino, himself a Catholic, cuts into the heart of why the Catholic Church and Christianity as a whole failed to stop the Holocaust.

Author: Anthony J. Sciolino

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 9781938908620

Category:

Page: 297

View: 152

In this study, author Anthony J. Sciolino, himself a Catholic, cuts into the heart of why the Catholic Church and Christianity as a whole failed to stop the Holocaust. He demonstrates that Nazism's racial anti-Semitism was rooted in Christian anti-Judaism. While tens of thousands of Christians risked their lives to save Jews, many more including some members of the hierarchy aided Hitler's campaign with their silence or their participation. Sciolino's research and interpretation provide an analysis of Christian doctrine and church history to help answer the question of what went wrong. He suggests that Christian tradition and teaching systematically excluded Jews from the circle of Christian concern and thus led to the tragedy of the Holocaust. From the origins of anti-Judaism and anti-Semitism and the controversial position of Pope Pius XII to the Catholic Church's current endeavors to hold itself accountable for their role, The Holocaust, the Church, and the Law of Unintended Consequences offers an examination of one of history's most disturbing issues.

Constantine s SwordConstantine s Sword



Examines the two-thousand-year relationship between Christianity and Judaism, examining the long entrenched tradition of anti-Semitism that culminated in the Church's failure to protest the Holocaust during World War II.

Author: James Carroll

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 0618219080

Category:

Page: 774

View: 479

Examines the two-thousand-year relationship between Christianity and Judaism, examining the long entrenched tradition of anti-Semitism that culminated in the Church's failure to protest the Holocaust during World War II.

Offenders Or Victims Offenders Or Victims



Olaf Blaschke takes up this provocative question by considering the tensions between German Catholicism and Judaism in the period of the KulturkÜmpfe. Did Catholic resentments merely construct ?their? secular Jew?

Author: Olaf Blaschke

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803225220

Category:

Page: 232

View: 680

Antisemitism is generally thought to derive from chimerical images of Jews, who became the victims of these projections. Some scholars, however, allege that the Jews? own conduct was the main cause of the hatred directed toward them in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Olaf Blaschke takes up this provocative question by considering the tensions between German Catholicism and Judaism in the period of the KulturkÜmpfe. Did Catholic resentments merely construct ?their? secular Jew? Or did their antisemitism in fact derive from their perceptions of the conduct of liberal Jewish ?offenders? during a period of social stress? Blaschke?s deeper look at this crucial period of German history, particularly as revealed in the Catholic and Jewish presses, provides new and sometimes surprising insights.

The Catholic Church and the Holocaust 1930 1965The Catholic Church and the Holocaust 1930 1965



Phayer explores the actions of the Catholic Church and the actions of individual Catholics during the crucial period from the emergence of Hitler until the Church's official rejection of antisemitism in 1965. 20 photos.

Author: Michael Phayer

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253214713

Category:

Page: 324

View: 972

Phayer explores the actions of the Catholic Church and the actions of individual Catholics during the crucial period from the emergence of Hitler until the Church's official rejection of antisemitism in 1965. 20 photos.

The Catholic Church and AntisemitismThe Catholic Church and Antisemitism



Chapter 14 By Way of Contrast: The Polish Opponents of Antisemitism If Christianity is more than Catholicism, and the Catholic church more than popes and bishops, interwar Poland was certainly more than the Catholic press and the Polish ...

Author: Ronald Modras

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135286187

Category:

Page: 438

View: 350

Interwar Poland was home to more Jews than any other country in Europe. Its commonplace but simplistic identification with antisemitism was due largely to nationalist efforts to boycott Jewish business. That they failed was not for want of support by the Catholic clergy, for whom the ''Jewish question'' was more than economic. The myth of a Masonic-Jewish alliance to subvert Christian culture first flourished in France but held considerable sway over Catholics in 1930s Poland as elsewhere. This book examines how, following Vatican policy, Polish church leaders resisted separation of church and state in the name of Catholic culture. In that struggle, every assimilated Jew served as both a symbol and a potential agent of security. Antisemitism is no longer regarded as a legitimate political stance. But in Europe, the United States, and the Middle East, the issues of religious culture, national identity, and minorities are with us still. This study of interwar Poland will shed light on dilemmas that still effect us today.

Anti Semitism of the Catholic ChurchAnti Semitism of the Catholic Church



This book reveals in considerable detail the two millennial history of the virulent anti-Semitism of the Roman Catholic Church.

Author: Antony Stockwell

Publisher:

ISBN: 1514494426

Category:

Page: 490

View: 684

This book reveals in considerable detail the two millennial history of the virulent anti-Semitism of the Roman Catholic Church. It demonstrates that the Church's persistent barrage of invective and derogatory allegations led to wholesale slaughters of Jewish men, women and children. Furthermore, under canon law the Jew had scarcely the right of existence, and could only survive under conditions of virtual slavery. Consequently, Catholics 'plundered and persecuted the chosen race until their lives became a curse.' This Catholic hatred of the Jew, the longest hatred in human history, peaked during the Nazi Holocaust. The book clearly discloses that the Church, at all levels, facilitated the ascent of Adolf Hitler and his Nazi Party, and enabled the 'Final Solution to the Jewish Question'. It veri'es that most of the major participants in the planning, implementation, and butchering of the Holocaust were born and bred Catholics. Signi'cantly, the book also reveals that, over the centuries, the Catholic Church has itself been responsible for the deaths of at least as many Jews as were killed by the Nazis. Yet the Church has never admitted, nor apologised, nor made reparation, nor been punished for its fundamental role in these diabolical sins. In conclusion, the book con'rms that this proclaimed holy institution continues to deny its unholy history.

The Catholic Church and the JewsThe Catholic Church and the Jews



The Catholic Church and the Jews, Argentina, 1933-1945 considers the images of Jews presented in standard Catholic teaching of that era, the attitudes of the lower clergy and faithful toward the country?s Jewish citizens, and the response ...

Author: Graciela Ben-Dror

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803218895

Category:

Page: 278

View: 745

The impact of events in Nazi Germany and Europe during World War II was keenly felt in neutral Argentina among its predominantly Catholic population and its significant Jewish minority. The Catholic Church and the Jews, Argentina, 1933-1945 considers the images of Jews presented in standard Catholic teaching of that era, the attitudes of the lower clergy and faithful toward the country?s Jewish citizens, and the response of the politically influential Church hierarchy to the national debate on accepting Jewish refugees from Europe. The issue was complicated by such factors as the position taken by the Vatican, Argentina?s unstable political situation, and the sizeable number of citizens of German origin who were Nazi sympathizers eager to promote German interests. ø Argentina?s self-perception was as a ?Catholic? country. Though there were few overtly anti-Jewish acts, traditional stereotypes and prejudice were widespread and only a few voices in the Catholic community confronted the established attitudes. ø