The Bard Scheherazade Keep CompanyThe Bard Scheherazade Keep Company



Poems Jan D. Hodge. The Bard & Scheherazade Keep Company THE BARD &
SCHEHERAZADE Jan D. Hodge Q A B Front Cover.

Author: Jan D. Hodge

Publisher: Able Muse Press

ISBN: 9781927409848

Category:

Page: 112

View: 103

In The Bard and Scheherazade Keep Company, Jan D. Hodge shows impressive formal dexterity, and inventive use of the double dactyl. He turns the difficult form on its head as it transforms into a narrative vehicle, retelling the great classics—the plays of Shakespeare, the One Thousand and One Nights stories from the Islamic Golden Age (as recounted by the legendary Scheherazade to the sultan Shahrayar), and the series of medieval European folktales about the trickster, Reynard the Fox. Hodge’s versification of these classic masterpieces manages to liberate this restrictive form and yet sustain its strict rules. This delightfully witty, quirky, playful collection reads naturally, while remaining lexicographically bounteous. PRAISE FOR THE BARD AND SCHEHERAZADE KEEP COMPANY: Jan D. Hodge has given us an astonishing book—as remarkable a tour de force as ever I’ve seen. I wouldn’t have thought that witty verse form, the double dactyl, could be used to tell a story, but modifying the pattern only slightly, Hodge retells some celebrated stories in enjoyable style—Shakespeare plays, six tales from the Arabian Nights, and the popular medieval legend of Reynard the Fox. You don’t have to admire poetic ingenuity to read them with pleasure, but I’m all dumb doglike admiration at Hodge’s spectacular triumph. —X.J. Kennedy Jan D. Hodge’s mastery of the double dactyl is nothing short of stunning. Open this book at random, and you will find the form perfectly used, the language both natural and original, and the wit a delight. From Romeo to Reynard, you’re going to love these poems. —Gail White Jan D. Hodge has renovated the most challenging of light verse forms and transformed it into a vehicle for poems that revisit classic works of literature. Hodge’s deft handling of meter and intermittent quirky notes create a sense of intimacy between the reader and the poet that is both enjoyable and rare in today’s poetry. —A.M. Juster

Street ViewStreet View



... Second Rain – Poems Jan D. Hodge, Taking Shape – carmina figurata Jan D.
Hodge, The Bard & Scheherazade Keep Company – Poems Ellen Kaufman,
House Music – Poems Carol Light, Heaven from Steam – Poems April Lindner,
This ...

Author: Maryann Corbett

Publisher: Able Muse Press

ISBN: 9781927409916

Category:

Page: 102

View: 710

Maryann Corbett’s Street View is a panorama of views: suburban and urban avenues, shown in leaf and in snow; alleyways where misfits lurk in darkness, but also where “Adonis, charioteer of municipal waste collection, rides with the morning”; and boulevards of old buildings whose elegance remains undeniable, even when “prinked in the clown suit of commerce.” Street View also navigates the resiliency and failings of the human body, and the memories of family and pivotal acquaintances that shape viewpoints for good or ill. This is the work of a seasoned poet in command of her craft, and deservedly, a finalist for the 2016 Able Muse Book Award. PRAISE FOR STREET VIEW: Assaulted, as we all are, by relentless, restless noise-throbbing subwoofers, urban construction, cynical marketing and violent news, even our own banal chitchat-Maryann Corbett “strafe[s] back with the whole Roget/ and gun[s her] engine to its own rough strife. . . .” Though her weapons, her engines, are stillness, insight, and rhythm, there is indeed a sense in which the poems in Street View wallop their subjects with language. The exquisite, seemingly effortless grace of these poems with their penetrating music and humor deserve a commendation like that the poet gives Veronese: “This is the catechesis/ we need now, for the kind of sight we work with/ here, where the world kabooms.” -George David Clark Given her gift with detail, Maryann Corbett is the perfect person to offer a view, but an even more perfect person to offer a “street view,” the title of her new collection. While Corbett has made a career of being precise, she can be whimsical as well, right down to the “Northrop Mall . . . as fixed and formal as an English sonnet.” Yet perhaps her greatest strength is that she is not afraid to be the quiet steady gaze that takes in everything: all the things most people would miss. -Kim Bridgford Maryann Corbett takes the ode less traveled (not to mention the terzanelle less tried and the dactylic hexameter almost unheard of) to oddly familiar destinations: the West Side Y in New York City, Grand Avenue in St. Paul, the dentist’s clinic. She is a rhapsodist of times past and places lost or endangered, but she also lives very much in the present. She examines experiences with shrewdness and fascination, crafting them into poems that are breathtaking in their intelligence and brio. -Susan McLean In Maryann Corbett’s new book, we are given a Street View on the world, from Minneapolis to Jerusalem. These streets are populated with a variety of town characters, from the vagrant to the dangerous academic “Weirdo” with his void-sucked soul who makes one think of mass killings. Suffice it to say that the street view might be uglier than the view onto the mountains or the ocean, but in that ugliness can be found a clearer view on the truth of how we live today. -Tony Barnstone

Last WishesLast Wishes



... Second Rain – Poems Jan D. Hodge, Taking Shape – carmina figurata; The
Bard & Scheherazade Keep Company – Poems Ellen Kaufman, House Music –
Poems Double-Parked, with Tosca – Poems Emily Leithauser, The Borrowed
World ...

Author: Rob Wright

Publisher: Able Muse Press

ISBN: 9781773490717

Category:

Page: 86

View: 675

Rob Wright's Last Wishes is eclectic and delves into mining grit and lifestyle as fluently as it does into spiritual hopes and despairs, or the mind's lucidity and aberrations. Well-traveled in time and place, Last Wishes' culturally diverse characters and scenes--framed in Philadelphia, Fort Meyers, Manhattan, São Paulo, Kowloon, Majdanek, or elsewhere--are memorable or miserable. Accounts of ghosts and hauntings, imagined or real, include heart-stopping witness narratives of the Holocaust and other atrocities. This is a seasoned inaugural collection--a special honoree for the 2019 Able Muse Book Award. PRAISE FOR LAST WISHES Rob Wright's poems in Last Wishes ache with a quiet, exquisite music. Whether at the edge of the forest, or before a mirror regarding his own face, or at the limit of what a son can feel for his father, Wright calls us to join him on his search for order and meaning, even as he questions what he finds: "The shell that holds all grief and memory, / in chains of molecules that make a mind, / will turn back into atoms, hungry, free. / We're spirits caught inside our skin and hair-- / ephemeral our dramas, spun from air." Such is the breathtaking beauty of Last Wishes, to long for what seems so close and yet, in the end, we cannot know. --Rafael Campo, author of Comfort Measures Only: New and Selected Poems One of Wright's gifts is the age-old poetic magic of conveying beauty in what might at first appear to offer up nothing but ugliness. . . . It is fitting that one of the titles here is "Prologue for an Imaginary Play," because Wright's poems often are, in essence, little plays. The landscapes here are never static; like a photographer, or a cinematographer, Wright captures his subjects at their most revealing in a flash. Scenes are arranged and rendered at the moment of greatest drama and tension. --Alison Hicks (from the foreword), author of You Who Took the Boat Out  The first poem in Last Wishes describes in evocatively exact and gritty detail a landscape of abandoned mines, and ends with the poet’s mind reaching out toward the miners who once worked there: “I thought/ how hunger drives a man to crawl beneath/ the brittle crust that shuts out sun and sky.” Moments like this are repeated again and again throughout this obsessively compelling book—a surface (often enough a fairly bleak one) is described in richly precise detail, and out of it pasts, ghosts, the dead, revenants and spectral appearances emerge with a kind of beckoning, unreachable clarity that is at times wistful and at times brutal. If these poems were photographs most of them would be in grimmest black and white, but they would make a most marvelously enthralling exhibition. —Dick Davis, author of Faces of Love: Hafez and the Poets of Shiraz

Frozen CharlotteFrozen Charlotte



... Grasshopper – The Poetry of MA Griffiths Katie Hartsock, Bed of Impatiens –
Poems Elise Hempel, Second Rain – Poems Jan D. Hodge, Taking Shape –
carmina figurata; The Bard & Scheherazade Keep Company – Poems Ellen
Kaufman, ...

Author: Susan de Sola

Publisher: Able Muse Press

ISBN: 9781773490380

Category:

Page: 126

View: 300

Susan de Sola’s Frozen Charlotte spans the breadth of human experience-from celebration to lamentation, from gravity to lightheartedness, from domestic and quotidian scenarios to historic upheavals and their aftermaths, both European and American. She skillfully deploys an impressive range of formal styles and free verse in her debut collection. De Sola's Frozen Charlotte manifests all the hallmarks of a seasoned poet in surefootedness, wit, and depth of empathy.

PRAISE FOR FROZEN CHARLOTTE

The breadth of Susan de Sola’s poetry, by turns gossamer light and solemnly elegiac, offers a pleasurable aesthetic surprise from poem to poem-from “sun-starved Dutchmen” to immigrant Jews in Manhattan, from tulips to the life of a friend whose actual name she never knew, from the imagined language of rocks to a war widow’s cedar closet, from the death of an infant to conjugal love. Susan de Sola evinces wit and knowingness, a dexterity with verse, a way with form. The pleasure of de Sola’s poetry is to be in the presence of virtuosity and insight, of a poet who knows what it means to be human, and when to be serious and when to be light.
  -Mark Jarman, author of The Heronry

When I read Susan de Sola’s uncanny title poem “Frozen Charlotte” for the first time, I couldn’t stop thinking about it. I feel the same about the book as a whole, a virtuoso grouping of form and topic, a book that is haunting, yet which also sparkles with a sense of humor that I much enjoyed. Susan de Sola, it seems, can write in any form. While this book is her first full-length collection, it is the work of a master craftsperson.
  -Kim Bridgford, author of Undone

Whether their subject is a painting by Sargent, a gathering at the site of a Holocaust deportation center, or the bestial appearance of ATM machines, Susan de Sola’s poems seem animate with her vision: the poems breathe on the page. Part of de Sola’s power lies in her formal acumen. Every word here seems carefully sieved from the welter of English, and each poem’s form is perfectly matched to its ambition and music. De Sola’s tonal range is equally rich-she is by turns funny and dark, pensive and sly, her voice resounding in the reader’s head long after a poem’s final line. Like its memorable title poem, Frozen Charlotte intrigues, goes deep, surprises. It is a book rich with the pleasures the best poetry provides.
  -Clare Rossini, author of Lingo

This book has many moods and many messages for any reader who pays the poems collected here the attention they deserve. At times it seems a fairground, at times a graveyard, and neither cancels the other out. It is a mark of Susan de Sola’s always persuasive rhetoric that we see that both characterizations are somehow, simultaneously, true, and that despite their exhilarating variety these poems are of a piece and come from one complex, sophisticated, supremely alert sensibility.
  -Dick Davis (from the foreword), author of Love in Another Language

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Susan de Sola’s poems have appeared in many venues, such as the Hudson Review and PN Review, and in anthologies, including The Best American Poetry 2018. She is a winner of the David Reid Poetry Translation Prize and the Frost Farm Prize. She holds a PhD in English from the Johns Hopkins University and has published essays and reviews as Susan de Sola Rodstein. Her photography is featured in the chapbook Little Blue Man. A native New Yorker, she lives near Amsterdam with her family.

PearlPearl



... The Poetry of MA Griffiths Katie Hartsock, Bed of Impatiens – Poems Elise
Hempel, Second Rain – Poems Jan D. Hodge, Taking Shape – carmina figurata;
The Bard & Scheherazade Keep Company – Poems Ellen Kaufman, House
Music ...

Author: John Ridland

Publisher: Able Muse Press

ISBN: 9781927409893

Category:

Page: 154

View: 451

Pearl is an intricate fourteenth-century poem written by one of the greatest Middle English poets—the anonymous artist who also gave us Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. This medieval masterpiece presents the meditative Dream Vision of a father (the Dreamer) mourning the loss of a young daughter (his Pearl). Having recently translated Sir Gawain and the Green Knight to critical acclaim, John Ridland now tackles the even more challenging Pearl. He succeeds in giving us another innovative and pleasurable translation that retains line-by-line fidelity with the source material, while bringing the fourteenth-century Northwest Midland dialect into an unstrained contemporary idiom. Ridland's inventive meter and rhyme convey the sonic beauty of the original. Moreover, his preface provides a comprehensive background and analysis of Pearl, points out the techniques deployed by the original poet, and explains Ridland's own approach to translating the poem. This translation will delight and reward the reader. PRAISE FOR JOHN RIDLAND’S TRANSLATION OF PEARL: John Ridland’s translation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight made that fourteenth-century chivalric romance not only accessible but alive to our twenty-first century sensibilities. Now his translation Pearl, also by the anonymous Gawain Poet, does the same for that poignant dream vision. The poem’s formal complexities are still here, mutatis mutandis, but they enhance rather than obscure the story of a grieving father’s dream vision of his lost daughter in paradise. Six hundred years vanish, and the reader feels an intimate, profound emotional connection with the universal human experiences of loss, grief, and hope. —Richard Wakefield, author of A Vertical Mile An attractively readable translation, which makes a real attempt to convey the metrical beauty and intricacy of the original. —Ad Putter and Myra Stokes, editors of The Works of the Gawain Poet After reading John Ridland’s translation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight some time ago, I thought, “Well, he’s done it now: doomed himself to never achieving anything as remarkable as this again, because it’s impossible.” But I was wrong: his new translation of Pearl—an even more challenging work by the same anonymous fourteenth-century Gawain Poet—is equally musical and moves with the same charmed pace in the telling that is perfect for what is being told. —Rhina P. Espaillat, author of Her Place in These Designs John Ridland’s translation offers us, in accessible, contemporary English, all the dazzling complexity and beauty of Pearl’s structures, rhythms, and rhymes. —Maryann Corbett, winner, Willis Barnstone Translation Prize; author of Street View

American TheatreAmerican Theatre



He ' s the one who tells the story about Scheherezade telling stories to her
husband about a boy telling a story to the genie ... That ' s just the bare bones of
the plot Marin Shakespeare Company offers July 19 - Aug . ... as the Arabian
Nights , Currier ' s adaptation begins with a traveling merchant who must tell
stories in order to save his own life in a hostile town . ... Rushkoff , too , detects a
Shakespearean element ; the Bard , he points out , begins many of his plays with
a plea for the ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105113216258

Category:

Page:

View: 979

A Million of Facts A new editionA Million of Facts A new edition



Phy . who kept 100 bards . ... Even Alexander the Great Lope de Vega printed 21
millions of lines , was accompanied by a bard named Cherylus , and ... Printer ,
and Publisher . full half are on temporary topics and party His co - meteor was
Lord Byron , with less questions ; while 99 ... James I was a the Sultana
Sheherazade , who told them , as superstitious pedant who wrote 2 folios in
related , to Sultan ...

Author: Sir Richard PHILLIPS

Publisher:

ISBN: BL:A0020345283

Category:

Page:

View: 701

Persistent Questions in Public DiscussionPersistent Questions in Public Discussion



The right eloquence needs no bell to call the people together , and no constable
to keep them . It draws ... Scheherezade tells these stories to save her life , and
the delight of young Europe and young America in them proves that she fairly
earned it . ... These legends are only exaggerations of real occurrences , and
every literature contains these high compliments to the art of the orator and the
bard , from ...

Author: Alexander Magnus Drummond

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:$B794857

Category:

Page: 558

View: 132

Littell s Living AgeLittell s Living Age



... and though sufficiently addressed at six years old by the Bard of Rydal . exact
in the discharge of his scholastic duties , yet he evidently ... and almost unable to
keep their hold of the ground , ex- ending with a pregnant essay on the
connection tended arms , a glowing cheek ... the same Sultana Scheherezade ,
though his aim was much time seizing his own arm with the other hand very less
practical ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: NYPL:33433115421277

Category:

Page:

View: 922

The Living AgeThe Living Age



... and though sufficiently addressed at six years old by the Bard of Rydal . exact
in the discharge of his scholastic duties , yet he evidently ... and alınost unable to
keep their hold of the ground , ex . ending with a pregnant essay on the
connection tended arms , a glowing cheek ... Scheherezade , though his aiin was
much time seizing his own arm with the other hand very less practical :eagerly -
an action ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: CORNELL:31924079600965

Category:

Page:

View: 348

Littell s Living AgeLittell s Living Age



... and though sufficiently addressed at six years old by the Bard of Rydal . exact
in the discharge of his scholastic duties , yet he evidently ... and almost unable w
keep their hold of the ground , ex . ending with a pregnant essay on the
connection tended arms , a glowing cheek ... at the same Sultana Scheherezade
, though his aim was much time seizing his own arm with the other hand very less
practical ...

Author: Eliakim Littell

Publisher:

ISBN: UIUC:30112055965203

Category:

Page:

View: 524

The Literary WorldThe Literary World



I believe that the copies of verses I ' ve spun , Faithful to God and man , his song
and his life Like Scheherazade ' s tales ... It is trying , no doubt , when the
company knows Just the look and the smell of each lily and rose , 4th December .
... That love may hold from blinding passion free , Whose heart - throbs of verse
through our memories thrill Like a breath from ... Thou ! first of all our bards , hast
rung the chime Brave Whittier , whom I never met till now , Of souls , with zeal
against a ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015030082351

Category:

Page:

View: 677

The BooksellerThe Bookseller



Mr Nye continued : ' I enjoyed the company of Fenn and Susie , and being
allowed , as it were , to overhea their story , but in the end I had less sense of
having read ... The lesson to be learned is that Scheherazade did not keep the
king awake ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B3312328

Category:

Page:

View: 606

Classical and Medieval Literature CriticismClassical and Medieval Literature Criticism



Even the detail that Scheherazade ' s stories are drawn from the literal and
legendary foretime I find arresting . ... safer shall the bard his pen employ / With
yore , to dramatize the Tale of Troy , / Than , venturing trackless regions to
explore . ... Like a parable of Kafka ' s or a great myth , the story of deflowered
Scheherazade , yarning tirelessly through the dark hours to save her neck ,
corresponds to a ...

Author: Jelena O. Krstovic

Publisher:

ISBN: 0810323508

Category:

Page: 508

View: 344

The SpectatorThe Spectator



... whiteness of his neckcloth by the company were his father's most prominent
characteristics ; while , on the of publicans ... But besides being a clergyphetic
bard . ... might have been adopted with a plain statement of his mode of life ,
extenuating nought nor from Scheherezade , ) for a ... because it is an exertion of
the to keep a school at Ambleside , he seems to have given I may laugh at it at
first hearing ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015084586661

Category:

Page:

View: 230