The Acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553 Sessions VI VIII Vigilius Constituta Appendices Maps Glossary Bibliography IndicesThe Acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553 Sessions VI VIII Vigilius Constituta Appendices Maps Glossary Bibliography Indices



The editor argues that the work of the council deserves a more sympathetic evaluation that it has generally received in western Christendom, since it arguably clarified rather than distorted the message of Chalcedon and influenced the whole ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105124139291

Category:

Page:

View: 341

The Council of Constantinople of 553 (often called Constantinople II or the Fifth Ecumenical Council) has been described as 'by far the most problematic of all the councils', because it condemned two of the greatest biblical scholars and commentators of the patristic era Origen and Theodore of Mopsuestia and because the pope of the day, Vigilius, first condemned the council and then confirmed its decisions only under duress. The present edition makes accessible to the modern reader the acts of the council, session by session, and the most important related documents, particularly those that reveal the shifting stance of Pope Vigilius, veering between heroic resistance and abject compliance. The accompanying commentary and substantial introduction provide a background narrative of developments since Chalcedon, a full analysis of the policy of the emperor Justinian (who summoned and dominated the council) and of the issues in the debate, and information on the complex history of both the text and the council's reception. The editor argues that the work of the council deserves a more sympathetic evaluation that it has generally received in western Christendom, since it arguably clarified rather than distorted the message of Chalcedon and influenced the whole subsequent tradition of eastern Orthodoxy. In interpreting Chalcedon the conciliar acts provide a fascinating example of how a society in this case the imperial Church of Byzantium determines its identity by how it understands its past. -- Amazon.com.

The Acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553The Acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553



Because it condemned two of the greatest biblical scholars and commentators of the patristic era, the Council of Constantinople of 553 has long been considered the most controversial of the ecumenical councils.

Author: Richard Price

Publisher: Translated Texts for Historians

ISBN: 184631836X

Category:

Page: 347

View: 276

The Council of Constantinople of 553 (often called Constantinople II or the Fifth Ecumenical Council) has been described as 'by far the most problematic of all the councils', because it condemned two of the greatest biblical scholars and commentators of the patristic era Origen and Theodore of Mopsuestia and because the pope of the day, Vigilius, first condemned the council and then confirmed its decisions only under duress. The present edition makes accessible to the modern reader the acts of the council, session by session, and the most important related documents, particularly those that reveal the shifting stance of Pope Vigilius, veering between heroic resistance and abject compliance. The accompanying commentary and substantial introduction provide a background narrative of developments since Chalcedon, a full analysis of the policy of the emperor Justinian (who summoned and dominated the council) and of the issues in the debate, and information on the complex history of both the text and the council's reception. The editor argues that the work of the council deserves a more sympathetic evaluation that it has generally received in western Christendom, since it arguably clarified rather than distorted the message of Chalcedon and influenced the whole subsequent tradition of eastern Orthodoxy. In interpreting Chalcedon the conciliar acts provide a fascinating example of how a society in this case the imperial Church of Byzantium determines its identity by how it understands its past.

The acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553The acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553



The editor argues that the work of the council deserves a more sympathetic evaluation that it has generally received in western Christendom, since it arguably clarified rather than distorted the message of Chalcedon and influenced the whole ...

Author: Richard Price

Publisher:

ISBN: 1789628679

Category:

Page: 717

View: 995

The Council of Constantinople of 553 (often called Constantinople II or the Fifth Ecumenical Council) has been described as 'by far the most problematic of all the councils', because it condemned two of the greatest biblical scholars and commentators of the patristic era Origen and Theodore of Mopsuestia and because the pope of the day, Vigilius, first condemned the council and then confirmed its decisions only under duress. The present edition makes accessible to the modern reader the acts of the council, session by session, and the most important related documents, particularly those that reveal the shifting stance of Pope Vigilius, veering between heroic resistance and abject compliance. The accompanying commentary and substantial introduction provide a background narrative of developments since Chalcedon, a full analysis of the policy of the emperor Justinian (who summoned and dominated the council) and of the issues in the debate, and information on the complex history of both the text and the council's reception. The editor argues that the work of the council deserves a more sympathetic evaluation that it has generally received in western Christendom, since it arguably clarified rather than distorted the message of Chalcedon and influenced the whole subsequent tradition of eastern Orthodoxy. In interpreting Chalcedon the conciliar acts provide a fascinating example of how a society in this case the imperial Church of Byzantium determines its identity by how it understands its past. -- Amazon.com.

The Acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553 with Related Texts on the Three Chapters ControversyThe Acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553 with Related Texts on the Three Chapters Controversy



The editor argues that the work of the council deserves a more sympathetic evaluation that it has generally received in western Christendom, since it arguably clarified rather than distorted the message of Chalcedon and influenced the whole ...

Author: Richard Price

Publisher:

ISBN: 184631836X

Category:

Page: 347

View: 636

The Council of Constantinople of 553 (often called Constantinople II or the Fifth Ecumenical Council) has been described as 'by far the most problematic of all the councils', because it condemned two of the greatest biblical scholars and commentators of the patristic era Origen and Theodore of Mopsuestia and because the pope of the day, Vigilius, first condemned the council and then confirmed its decisions only under duress. The present edition makes accessible to the modern reader the acts of the council, session by session, and the most important related documents, particularly those that reveal the shifting stance of Pope Vigilius, veering between heroic resistance and abject compliance. The accompanying commentary and substantial introduction provide a background narrative of developments since Chalcedon, a full analysis of the policy of the emperor Justinian (who summoned and dominated the council) and of the issues in the debate, and information on the complex history of both the text and the council's reception. The editor argues that the work of the council deserves a more sympathetic evaluation that it has generally received in western Christendom, since it arguably clarified rather than distorted the message of Chalcedon and influenced the whole subsequent tradition of eastern Orthodoxy. In interpreting Chalcedon the conciliar acts provide a fascinating example of how a society in this case the imperial Church of Byzantium determines its identity by how it understands its past. -- Amazon.com.

The Acts of the Council of ChalcedonThe Acts of the Council of Chalcedon



This book is suitable for scholars studying this period.

Author: Richard Price

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 0853230390

Category:

Page: 720

View: 747

In 451 CE the Council of Chalcedon was called to assert the preeminence of orthodox Catholic doctrine against the heresy of men who refused what we now refer to as the Definition of Faith, or the belief in Jesus Christ as both man and divine spirit during his lifetime. This book is suitable for scholars studying this period.

The Acts of the Council of Constantinople Of 869 70The Acts of the Council of Constantinople Of 869 70



Out of all the acts of the great early councils, the acts of this council, of which this edition is the first modern translation, are the nearest to an accurate and complete record.

Author: Richard Price

Publisher:

ISBN: 1800856849

Category:

Page:

View: 636

The Council of Constantinople of 869-70 was highly dramatic, with its trial and condemnation of Patriarch Photius, a towering figure in the Byzantium of his day, and the tussle of wills at the council between the papal legates, the imperial representatives and the bishops. It was church politics and personalities rather than issues of doctrine, such as icon veneration, that dominated the debates. Out of all the acts of the great early councils, the acts of this council, of which this edition is the first modern translation, are the nearest to an accurate and complete record. Its protest against secularinterference in ecclesiastical elections was taken up later in the West and led to this council's being accorded full ecumenical status, although it had been repudiated in Byzantium soon after it was held. No early council expresses so vividly the tension between Rome's claim to supreme authority and the Byzantine reduction of this to a primacy of honour.

The Council of Ephesus of 431The Council of Ephesus of 431



The Acts of the Council of Ephesus of 431 consist of a wide variety of documents, including proceedings and letters, that provide a unique insight into how in the context of a major dispute opinion was manipulated and pressure applied on ...

Author: Richard Price

Publisher:

ISBN: 1789621488

Category:

Page:

View: 465

The First Council of Ephesus (431) was the climax of the so-called Nestorian Controversy. Convoked by the emperor Theodosius II to restore peace to the Church, it immediately divided into two rival councils, both meeting at Ephesus. Attempts by the emperor's representatives to get the bishops on both sides to meet together had no success, and after four months the council was dissolved without having ever properly met. But a number of decrees by the larger of the two rival councils, in particular the condemnation of Nestorius of Constantinople, were subsequently accepted as the valid decrees of the 'ecumenical council of Ephesus'. The documentation, consisting of conciliar proceedings, letters and other documents, provides information not only about events in Ephesus itself, but also about lobbying and public demonstrations in Constantinople. There is no episode in late Roman history where we are so well informed about how politics were conducted in the imperial capital. This makes the Acts a document of first importance for the history of the Later Roman Empire as well for that of the Church.

Chalcedon in ContextChalcedon in Context



The Acts of the Councils are one of the largest collections of source materials relating to the Church of Late Antiquity and its state relations, and this volume places the acclaimed translation in context with the Council of Chalcedon of ...

Author: Richard Price

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9781846316487

Category:

Page: 205

View: 561

The Council of Chalcedon in 451 was a defining moment in the Christological controversies that tore apart the churches of the Eastern Roman Empire in the fifth and sixth centuries, as theological division, political rivalry, and sectarian violence produced a schism that persists to this day between Chalcedonian and non-Chalcedonian churches. The Acts of the Councils are one of the largest collections of source materials relating to the Church of Late Antiquity and its state relations, and this volume places the acclaimed translation in context with the Council of Chalcedon of 451, ultimately informing historians on how to approach manifold aspects of these documents.

The Acts of the Second Council of Nicaea 787 The Acts of the Second Council of Nicaea 787



The Second Council of Nicaea decreed that religious images are to be venerated, making the cult of icons central in Eastern Orthodoxy.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 1789621577

Category:

Page: 752

View: 545

Two volume set The Second Council of Nicaea (787) decreed that religious images were to set up in churches and venerated. It thereby established the cult of icons as a central element in the piety of the Orthodox churches, as it has remained ever since. In the West its decrees received a new emphasis in the Counter-Reformation, in the defence of the role of art in religion. It is a text of prime importance for the iconoclast controversy of eighth-century Byzantium, one of the most explored and contested topics in Byzantine history. But it has also a more general significance - in the history of culture and the history of art. This edition offers the first translation that is based on the new critical edition of this text in the Acta Conciliorum Oecumenicorum series, and the first full commentary of this work that has ever been written. It will be of interest to a wide range of readers from a variety of disciplines.

The Council of Ephesus of 431The Council of Ephesus of 431



The Acts of the Council of Ephesus of 431 consist of a wide variety of documents, including proceedings and letters, that provide a unique insight into how in the context of a major dispute opinion was manipulated and pressure applied on ...

Author: Richard Price

Publisher:

ISBN: 178962147X

Category:

Page: 528

View: 234

The First Council of Ephesus (431) was the climax of the so-called Nestorian Controversy. Convoked by the emperor Theodosius II to restore peace to the Church, it immediately divided into two rival councils, both meeting at Ephesus. Attempts by the emperor's representatives to get the bishops on both sides to meet together had no success, and after four months the council was dissolved without having ever properly met. But a number of decrees by the larger of the two rival councils, in particular the condemnation of Nestorius of Constantinople, were subsequently accepted as the valid decrees of the 'ecumenical council of Ephesus'. The documentation, consisting of conciliar proceedings, letters and other documents, provides information not only about events in Ephesus itself, but also about lobbying and public demonstrations in Constantinople. There is no episode in late Roman history where we are so well informed about how politics were conducted in the imperial capital. This makes the Acts a document of first importance for the history of the Later Roman Empire as well for that of the Church.

Journal of the Australian Early Medieval AssociationJournal of the Australian Early Medieval Association



The Acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553 Translated Texts for Historians, vol. 51 (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2012 [rev. edn]) paperback, xiv + 370 and vi + 347 pages, RRP £120.00; ISBN 9781846318368 The idea that ...

Author: Geoffrey D. Dunn

Publisher: The Australian Early Medieval Association Inc.

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 950

The journal welcomes papers on historical, literary, archaeological, cultural, and artistic themes, particularly interdisciplinary papers and those that make an innovative and significant contribution to the understanding of the early medieval world and stimulate further discussion. For submission details please see the association website: www.aema.net.au. Submissions then may be sent to [email protected]

The Acts of the Lateran Synod Of 649The Acts of the Lateran Synod Of 649



This is the first translation of the Acts of the Lateran Synod of 649 into any modern language, and the first with a commentary.

Author:

Publisher: Translated Texts for Historians

ISBN: 1781383448

Category:

Page: 472

View: 375

The Lateran Synod of 649 was a major event in the 'monothelete' controversy of the seventh century over 'wills' and 'operations' in Christ. It represented a determined attempt by the papacy to frustrate and reverse the ecclesiastical policy of the emperor and patriarch at Constantinople. It represented the boldest challenge to imperial authority by churchmen that late antiquity had seen. The theology adopted by the synod and its expression in a series of speeches was the work of a team of Greek monks under the leadership of St Maximus the Confessor. This translation will add to the still limited body of material available in English for the study of a writer who is widely held to have been the greatest of all Byzantine theologians. The Acts of the synod have been a major puzzle ever since their editor, Rudolf Riedinger, demonstrated that the Greek version, not the Latin, is the original, even though the council must have conducted its business in Latin. This edition offers a new explanation of this anomaly, which restores authenticity to the synodal sessions, without denying that the Acts, as published, were not a straight factual record but propaganda intended to convince the Roman world of the orthodoxy and authority of the papacy.

Great Events in Religion An Encyclopedia of Pivotal Events in Religious History 3 volumes Great Events in Religion An Encyclopedia of Pivotal Events in Religious History 3 volumes



The Acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553 (with related texts on the Three Chapters Controversy, 2 vols.). Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2009. Price, Richard. “The Development of a Chalcedonian Identity in Byzantium ...

Author: Florin Curta

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 9781610695664

Category:

Page: 1047

View: 629

This three-volume set presents fundamental information about the most important events in world religious history as well as substantive discussions of their significance and impact. • Presents readers with essential information about the chief events in religious history that will help them better understand world history and promote a greater respect for culturally diverse religious traditions • Provides cross-references and sidebars that cite print and electronic resources for further reading with each entry • Includes a selected, general bibliography of print and electronic resources suitable for student research

The Story of Creeds and ConfessionsThe Story of Creeds and Confessions



The Fifth and Sixth Ecumenical Councils, at Constantinople in 553 and in 680–81, clarified what it meant for God the Son ... to the Fifth Ecumenical Council, see Richard Price, trans., The Acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553, ...

Author: Donald Fairbairn

Publisher: Baker Academic

ISBN: 9781493418183

Category:

Page: 416

View: 958

Creeds and confessions throughout Christian history provide a unique vantage point from which to study the Christian faith. To this end, Donald Fairbairn and Ryan Reeves construct a story that captures both the central importance of creeds and confessions over the centuries and their unrealized potential to introduce readers to the overall sweep of church history. The book features texts of classic creeds and confessions as well as informational sidebars.

Social Conflict in the Age of JustinianSocial Conflict in the Age of Justinian



(2009b), 'The Second Council of Constantinople (553) and the Malleable Past', in Price and Whitby (2009), 117-32. — (2009c) (ed.), The Acts ofConstantinople 553. See Acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553. Price, R. and Whitby, ...

Author: Peter N. Bell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199567331

Category:

Page: 393

View: 143

Our understanding of Late Antiquity can be transformed by the non-dogmatic application of social theory to more traditional evidence when studying major social conflicts in the Eastern Roman Empire, not least under the Emperor Justinian (527-565). Social Conflict in the Age of Justinian explores a range of often violent conflicts across the whole empire - on the land, in religion, and in sport - during this pivotal period in European history. Drawing on both sociology and social psychology, and on his experience as a senior British Civil Servant dealing with violent political conflicts in Northern Ireland and elsewhere, Bell shows that such conflicts were a basic feature of the overwhelmingly agricultural political economy of the empire. These conflicts were reflected at the ideological level and lead to intense persecution of intellectuals and Pagans as an ever more robust Christian ideological hegemony was established. In challenging the loyalties of all social classes, they also increased the vulnerability of an emperor and his allies. The need to legitimise the emperor, through an increasingly sacralised monarchy, and to build a loyal constituency, consequently remained a top priority for Justinian, even if his repeated efforts to unite the churches failed.

The Minor Prophets As Christian Scripture in the Commentaries of Theodore of Mopsuestia and Cyril of AlexandriaThe Minor Prophets As Christian Scripture in the Commentaries of Theodore of Mopsuestia and Cyril of Alexandria



Richard Price and Michael Gaddis, The Acts of the Council of Chalcedon, 3 vols. (Liverpool, 2005). Acts of the Council of Constantinople (553). Ed. Eduard Schwartz, Acta Conciliorum Oecumenicorum, Tome IV, vol.

Author: Hauna T. Ondrey

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198824534

Category:

Page: 288

View: 753

This work compares the Minor Prophets commentaries of Theodore of Mopsuestia and Cyril of Alexandria, isolating the role each interpreter assigns the Twelve Prophets in their ministry to Old Testament Israel and the texts of the Twelve as Christian scripture. Hauna T. Ondrey argues that Theodore does acknowledge christological prophecies, as distinct from both retrospective accommodation and typology. A careful reading of Cyril's Commentary on the Twelve limits the prospective christological revelation he ascribes to the prophets and reveals the positive role he grants the Mosaic law prior to Christ's advent. Exploring secondly the Christian significance Theodore and Cyril assign to Israel's exile and restoration reveals that Theodore's reading of the Twelve Prophets, while not attempting to be christocentric, is nevertheless self-consciously Christian. Cyril, unsurprisingly, offers a robust Christian reading of the Twelve, yet this too must be expanded by his focus on the church and concern to equip the church through the ethical paideusis provided by the plain sense of the prophetic text. Revised descriptions of each interpreter lead to the claim that a recent tendency to distinguish the Old Testament interpretation of Theodore (negatively) and Cyril (positively) on the basis of their "christocentrism" obscures more than it clarifies and polarizes no less than earlier accounts of Antiochene/Alexandrian exegesis. The conclusion argues against replacing old dichotomies with new and advocates rather for an approach that takes seriously Theodore's positive account of the unity and telos of the divine economy and the full range of Cyril's interpretation.

The Roman Empire in Late AntiquityThe Roman Empire in Late Antiquity



Musurillo, H., The Acts of the Christian Martyrs (Oxford, 1972) Acts of Chalcedon, tr. Price, R. M. and Gaddis, M., The Acts of the Council of Chalcedon (Liverpool, 2005) Acts of Council of Constantinople 553, tr. Price, R., The Acts of ...

Author: Hugh Elton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108686273

Category:

Page:

View: 343

In this volume, Hugh Elton offers a detailed and up to date history of the last centuries of the Roman Empire. Beginning with the crisis of the third century, he covers the rise of Christianity, the key Church Councils, the fall of the West to the Barbarians, the Justinianic reconquest, and concludes with the twin wars against Persians and Arabs in the seventh century AD. Elton isolates two major themes that emerge in this period. He notes that a new form of decision-making was created, whereby committees debated civil, military, and religious matters before the emperor, who was the final arbiter. Elton also highlights the evolution of the relationship between aristocrats and the Empire, and provides new insights into the mechanics of administering the Empire, as well as frontier and military policies. Supported by primary documents and anecdotes, The Roman Empire in Late Antiquity is designed for use in undergraduate courses on late antiquity and early medieval history.

In Defense of Extended Conciliar ChristologyIn Defense of Extended Conciliar Christology



“The Second Council of Constantinople (553) and the Malleable Past.” In Chalcedon in Context: Church Councils 400–700, edited by Richard Price and Mary Whitby, 117–32. ... The Acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553.

Author: Timothy Pawl

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192570871

Category:

Page: 272

View: 755

In Defense of Extended Conciliar Christology: A Philosophical Essay examines the logical consistency and coherence of Extended Conciliar Christology-the Christological doctrine that results from conjoining Conciliar Christology, the Christology of the first seven ecumenical councils of the Christian Church, with five additional theses. These theses are the claims that multiple incarnations are possible; Christ descended into Hell during his three days of death; Christ's human will was free; Christ was impeccable; and that Christ, via his human intellect, knew all things past, present, and future. These five theses, while not found in the first seven ecumenical councils, are common in the Christian theological tradition. The main question Timothy Pawl asks in this book is whether these five theses, when conjoined with Conciliar Christology, imply a contradiction. This study does not undertake to defend the truth of Extended Conciliar Christology. Rather, it shows that the extant philosophical objections to Extended Conciliar Christology fail.