Symposium and the Death of SocratesSymposium and the Death of Socrates



The other dialogues collected here under the title "The Death of Socrates" tell the tale of how Socrates was put on trial for impiety, found guilty and sentenced to death.

Author: Plato

Publisher: Wordsworth Editions

ISBN: 1853264792

Category:

Page: 211

View: 230

"Symposium" gives an account of the sparkling society that was Athens at the height of her empire. The other dialogues collected here under the title "The Death of Socrates" tell the tale of how Socrates was put on trial for impiety, found guilty and sentenced to death.

PlatoPlato



Each volume in this series has a full Introduction, including biographical details and a further reading list.

Author: Plato

Publisher: Collector's Library

ISBN: 1904919103

Category:

Page: 320

View: 173

Each volume in this series has a full Introduction, including biographical details and a further reading list.

PhaedoPhaedo



Phaedo tells the story that following the discussion, he and the others were there to witness the death of Socrates.

Author: Plato

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1533647488

Category:

Page: 98

View: 202

Phaedo, also known to ancient readers as On The Soul, is one of the best-known dialogues of Plato's middle period, along with the Republic and the Symposium. The Phaedo, which depicts the death of Socrates, is also Plato's fourth and last dialogue to detail the philosopher's final days, following Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito. In the dialogue, Socrates discusses the nature of the afterlife on his last day before being executed by drinking hemlock. Socrates has been imprisoned and sentenced to death by an Athenian jury for not believing in the gods of the state (though some scholars think it was more for his support of "philosopher kings" as opposed to democracy)[2] and for corrupting the youth of the city. The dialogue is told from the perspective of one of Socrates' students, Phaedo of Elis. Having been present at Socrates' death bed, Phaedo relates the dialogue from that day to Echecrates, a Pythagorean philosopher. By engaging in dialectic with a group of Socrates' friends, including the Thebans Cebes and Simmias, Socrates explores various arguments for the soul's immortality in order to show that there is an afterlife in which the soul will dwell following death. Phaedo tells the story that following the discussion, he and the others were there to witness the death of Socrates.

PhaedoPhaedo



Phaedo tells the story that following the discussion, he and the others were there to witness the death of Socrates.

Author: Plato

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 154044984X

Category:

Page: 88

View: 168

Phaedo is one of the best-known dialogues of Plato's middle period, along with the Republic and the Symposium. The Phaedo, which depicts the death of Socrates, is also Plato's fourth and last dialogue to detail the philosopher's final days, following Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito. In the dialogue, Socrates discusses the nature of the afterlife on his last day before being executed by drinking hemlock. Socrates has been imprisoned and sentenced to death by an Athenian jury for not believing in the gods of the state (though some scholars think it was more for his support of "philosopher kings" as opposed to democracy) and for corrupting the youth of the city. The dialogue is told from the perspective of one of Socrates' students, Phaedo of Elis. Having been present at Socrates' death bed, Phaedo relates the dialogue from that day to Echecrates, a Pythagorean philosopher. By engaging in dialectic with a group of Socrates' friends, including the Thebans, Cebes, and Simmias, Socrates explores various arguments for the soul's immortality in order to show that there is an afterlife in which the soul will dwell following death. Phaedo tells the story that following the discussion, he and the others were there to witness the death of Socrates.

The Death of Socrates and the Life of PhilosophyThe Death of Socrates and the Life of Philosophy



Symposium . For Hermogenes see Plato Cratylus ; Xenophon Symposium , Apology of Socrates to the Jury , Memorabilia 2.10 , 4.8 . For Epigenes see Xenophon ...

Author: Peter J. Ahrensdorf

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791426335

Category:

Page: 238

View: 529

Shows that the dialogue in Plato's Phaedo is primarily devoted to presenting Socrates' final defense of the philosophical life against the theoretical and political challenge of religion.

PhaedoPhaedo



The dialogue is told from the perspective of one of Socrates' students, Phaedo of Elis. Having been present at Socrates' death bed, Phaedo relates the dialogue from that day to Echecrates, a Pythagorean philosopher.

Author: Plato

Publisher:

ISBN: 1492860107

Category:

Page: 92

View: 208

Plato's Phaedo is one of the great dialogues of his middle period, along with the Republic and the Symposium. The Phaedo, which depicts the death of Socrates, is also Plato's fourth and last dialogue to detail the philosopher's final days, following Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito. In the dialogue, Socrates discusses the nature of the afterlife on his last day before being executed by drinking hemlock. Socrates has been imprisoned and sentenced to death by an Athenian jury for not believing in the gods of the state and for corrupting the youth of the city. The dialogue is told from the perspective of one of Socrates' students, Phaedo of Elis. Having been present at Socrates' death bed, Phaedo relates the dialogue from that day to Echecrates, a Pythagorean philosopher.

The Works of PlatoThe Works of Plato



The Works of Plato: Analysis of Plato & The Republic are original Cosimo editions of a four-volume work, translated and analyzed by Benjamin Jowett.

Author: Plato

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 9781616403140

Category:

Page: 458

View: 826

The Works of Plato: Analysis of Plato & The Republic are original Cosimo editions of a four-volume work, translated and analyzed by Benjamin Jowett. All of the works contained within are also published as separate works, but the four-volume set has added commentary from Jowett, considered one of the best translators of Plato's works. There are three editions in the Cosimo set; Volumes I and II make up the first book, and Volumes III and IV make up the second and third books. This set is ideal for any scholar of Plato and philosophy, whether amateur or seasoned. Volume III contains Plato's works concerning questions of the soul, mortality, love, and piety. Also included are dialogues featuring Plato's beloved teacher, Socrates. Included in Volume III: Meno, Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo, The Symposium, and Phaedrus. One of the greatest Western philosophers who ever lived, Plato (c. 428-347 B.C.) was a student of Socrates and teacher of Aristotle. Plato was greatly influenced by Socrates' teachings, often using him as a character in scripts and plays (Socratic dialogues), which he used to demonstrate philosophical ideas. Plato's dialogues were and still are used to teach a wide range of subjects, including politics, mathematics, rhetoric, logic, and, naturally, philosophy.

The Shorter Socratic WritingsThe Shorter Socratic Writings



This book presents translations of three dialogues Xenophon devoted to the life and thought of his teacher, Socrates.

Author: Xenophon

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801472989

Category:

Page: 201

View: 202

This book presents translations of three dialogues Xenophon devoted to the life and thought of his teacher, Socrates. Each is accompanied by notes and an interpretative essay that will introduce new readers to Xenophon and foster further reflection in those familiar with his writing. "Apology of Socrates to the Jury" shows how Socrates conducted himself when he was tried on the capital charge of not believing in the city's gods and corrupting the young. Although Socrates did not secure his own acquittal, he profoundly impressed some listeners who then helped to shape the public perception of philosophy as a noble, if highly idiosyncratic, way of life. In "Oeconomicus," Xenophon relates the conversation Socrates had on the day he turned from the study of natural philosophy to that of moral and political matters. "Oeconomicus" is concerned most directly with the character and purpose of Socrates' political philosophy. Xenophon provides entertaining portraits of Socrates' circle of friends in the "Symposium." In the process, he conveys the source of every individual's pride in himself, thus defining for each a conception of human excellence or virtue. The dialogue concludes with Socrates' beautiful speech on love (eros) and its proper place in the good or happy life.

Phaedo with Notes Biography Phaedo with Notes Biography



Phaedo tells the story that following the discussion, he and the others were there to witness the death of Socrates.

Author: Plato

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN: 179461902X

Category:

Page: 152

View: 488

Phaedo, also known to ancient readers as On The Soul, is one of the best-known dialogues of Plato's middle period, along with the Republic and the Symposium. The Phaedo, which depicts the death of Socrates, is also Plato's fourth and last dialogue to detail the philosopher's final days, following Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito.In the dialogue, Socrates discusses the nature of the afterlife on his last day before being executed by drinking hemlock. Socrates has been imprisoned and sentenced to death by an Athenian jury for not believing in the gods of the state (though some scholars think it was more for his support of "philosopher kings" as opposed to democracy)[2] and for corrupting the youth of the city. The dialogue is told from the perspective of one of Socrates' students, Phaedo of Elis. Having been present at Socrates' death bed, Phaedo relates the dialogue from that day to Echecrates, a Pythagorean philosopher. By engaging in dialectic with a group of Socrates' friends, including the Thebans Cebes and Simmias, Socrates explores various arguments for the soul's immortality in order to show that there is an afterlife in which the soul will dwell following death. Phaedo tells the story that following the discussion, he and the others were there to witness the death of Socrates.

The Platonic Dialogues for English Readers Dialogues of the Socratic school and dialogues referring to the trial and death of SocratesThe Platonic Dialogues for English Readers Dialogues of the Socratic school and dialogues referring to the trial and death of Socrates



Hence it is inferred that the Phædo was written many years after the death of Socrates , and contemporaneously with the Symposium .

Author: Plato

Publisher:

ISBN: PRNC:32101068132685

Category:

Page:

View: 954

The SymposiumThe Symposium



In his brilliant dialogue, Symposium, Plato presents an imaginary dinner-party set in Athens in 416 BC where the guests include Aristophanes, Socrates and the most popular Athenian of his day, golden boy Alcibiades.

Author: Plato

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9781365614453

Category:

Page: 50

View: 394

In his brilliant dialogue, Symposium, Plato presents an imaginary dinner-party set in Athens in 416 BC where the guests include Aristophanes, Socrates and the most popular Athenian of his day, golden boy Alcibiades. The sequence of dazzling speeches culminates in Socrates' famous account of the views of Diotima, a prophetess who taught him that love is our means of trying to attain goodness.

SymposiumSymposium



pubOne.info present you this new edition.

Author: Plato

Publisher: Pubone.Info

ISBN: ONB:+Z225145309

Category:

Page: 140

View: 843

pubOne.info present you this new edition. Of all the works of Plato the Symposium is the most perfect in form, and may be truly thought to contain more than any commentator has ever dreamed of; or, as Goethe said of one of his own writings, more than the author himself knew. For in philosophy as in prophecy glimpses of the future may often be conveyed in words which could hardly have been understood or interpreted at the time when they were uttered (compare Symp. )- which were wiser than the writer of them meant, and could not have been expressed by him if he had been interrogated about them. Yet Plato was not a mystic, nor in any degree affected by the Eastern influences which afterwards overspread the Alexandrian world. He was not an enthusiast or a sentimentalist, but one who aspired only to see reasoned truth, and whose thoughts are clearly explained in his language. There is no foreign element either of Egypt or of Asia to be found in his writings. And more than any other Platonic work the Symposium is Greek both in style and subject, having a beauty 'as of a statue, ' while the companion Dialogue of the Phaedrus is marked by a sort of Gothic irregularity.

How Socrates Became SocratesHow Socrates Became Socrates



Thus, Plato rendered his becoming discoverable only to readers truly invested. In How Socrates Became Socrates, Laurence Lampert recognizes the path of Plato’s strides and guides us through the true account of Socrates’ becoming.

Author: Laurence Lampert

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226746470

Category:

Page: 248

View: 497

Plato dispersed his account of how Socrates became Socrates across three dialogues. Thus, Plato rendered his becoming discoverable only to readers truly invested. In How Socrates Became Socrates, Laurence Lampert recognizes the path of Plato’s strides and guides us through the true account of Socrates’ becoming. He divulges how and why Plato ordered his Phaedo, Parmenides, and Symposium chronologically to give readers access to Socrates’ development on philosophy’s fundamental questions of being and knowing. In addition to a careful and precise analysis of Plato’s Phaedo,Parmenides, and Symposium, Lampert shows that properly entwined, Plato’s three dialogues fuse to portray a young thinker entering philosophy’s true radical power. Lampert reveals why this radicality needed to be guarded and places this discussion within the greater scheme of the politics of philosophy.

Phaedo by PlatoPhaedo by Plato



Phaedo also known to ancient readers as On The Soul, is one of the best-known dialogues of Plato's middle period, along with the Republic and the Symposium.

Author: Plato

Publisher:

ISBN: 1976434041

Category:

Page: 72

View: 200

Phaedo also known to ancient readers as On The Soul, is one of the best-known dialogues of Plato's middle period, along with the Republic and the Symposium. The Phaedo, which depicts the death of Socrates, is also Plato's fourth and last dialogue to detail the philosopher's final days, following Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito.

Apology Crito and Phaedo of SocratesApology Crito and Phaedo of Socrates



Phædo or Phaedo , also known to ancient readers as On The Soul, is one of the best-known dialogues of Plato's middle period, along with the Republic and the Symposium.

Author: Plato Plato

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1986401596

Category:

Page: 106

View: 166

Phædo or Phaedo , also known to ancient readers as On The Soul, is one of the best-known dialogues of Plato's middle period, along with the Republic and the Symposium. The philosophical subject of the dialogue is the immortality of the soul. It is set in the last hours prior to the death of Socrates, and is Plato's fourth and last dialogue to detail the philosopher's final days, following Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito.

Socrates and Alcibiades Four TextsSocrates and Alcibiades Four Texts



This text explores the fragmentary historical relationship between these two men along with the discussion of Socrates’ alleged offense of corrupting the youth of Athens, his impiety, and his sentence of death for those offenses.

Author: David Johnson

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 9781585104659

Category:

Page: 128

View: 159

Socrates and Alcibiades: Four Texts gathers together translations our four most important sources for the relationship between Socrates and the most controversial man of his day, the gifted and scandalous Alcibiades. In addition to Alcibiades’ famous speech from Plato’s Symposium, this text includes two dialogues, the Alcibiades I and Alcibiades II, attributed to Plato in antiquity but unjustly neglected today, and the complete fragments of the dialogue Alcibiades by Plato’s contemporary, Aeschines of Sphettus. These works are essential reading for anyone interested in Socrates’ improbable love affair with Athens’ most desirable youth, his attempt to woo Alcibiades from his ultimately disastrous worldly ambitions to the philosophical life, and the reasons for Socrates’ failure, which played a large role in his conviction by an Athenian court on charges of impiety and corrupting the youth. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate audience.

Socrates Founding Political Philosophy in Xenophon s Economist Symposium and Apology Socrates Founding Political Philosophy in Xenophon s Economist Symposium and Apology



Accordingly, we soon hear Socrates quoted giving, as his principal explicit reason for preferring death to life, his thus avoiding the otherwise likely ...

Author: Thomas L. Pangle

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226642505

Category:

Page: 304

View: 590

The oeuvre of the Greek historian Xenophon, whose works stand with those of Plato as essential accounts of the teachings of Socrates, has seen a new surge of attention after decades in the shadows. And no one has done more in recent years to spearhead the revival than Thomas L. Pangle. Here, Pangle provides a sequel to his study of Xenophon’s longest account of Socrates, the Memorabilia, expanding the scope of inquiry through an incisive treatment of Xenophon’s shorter Socratic dialogues, the Economist, the Symposium, and the Apology of Socrates to the Jury. What Pangle reveals is that these three depictions of Socrates complement and, in fact, serve to complete the Memorabilia in meaningful ways. Unlike the Socrates of Plato, Xenophon’s Socrates is more complicated and human, an individual working out the problem of what it means to live well and virtuously. While the Memorabilia defends Socrates by stressing his likeness to conventionally respectable gentlemen, Xenophon’s remaining Socratic texts offer a more nuanced characterization by highlighting how Socrates also diverges from conventions of gentlemanliness in his virtues, behaviors, and peculiar views of quotidian life and governmental rule. One question threads through the three writings: Which way of life best promotes human existence, politics, and economics—that of the Socratic political philosopher with his philosophic virtues or that of the gentleman with his familial, civic, and moral virtues? In uncovering the nuances of Xenophon’s approach to the issue in the Economist, Symposium, and Apology, Pangle’s book cements the significance of these writings for the field and their value for shaping a fuller conception of just who Socrates was and what he taught.