The Wisconsin State ConstitutionThe Wisconsin State Constitution



Each volume in this innovative series contains a historical overview of the state's constitutional development, a section-by-section analysis of its current constitution, and a comprehensive guide to further research.

Author: Steve Miller

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190927738

Category:

Page: 296

View: 174

The Wisconsin State Constitution provides an outstanding constitutional and historical account of the state's governing charter. In addition to an overview of Wisconsin's constitutional history, it provides an in-depth, section-by-section analysis of the entire constitution, detailing the many significant changes that have been made since its initial drafting. This treatment, along with a table of cases, index, and bibliography provides an unsurpassed reference guide for students, scholars, and practitioners of Wisconsin's constitution. The second edition adds commentary on significant Wisconsin Supreme Court cases and a few appellate court cases decided after 1995 through 2018. It also adds several resources to the bibliography and covers 23 years of history including several new constitutional amendments. Previously published by Greenwood, this title has been brought back in to circulation by Oxford University Press with new verve. Re-printed with standardization of content organization in order to facilitate research across the series, this title, as with all titles in the series, is set to join the dynamic revision cycle of The Oxford Commentaries on the State Constitutions of the United States. The Oxford Commentaries on the State Constitutions of the United States is an important series that reflects a renewed international interest in constitutional history and provides expert insight into each of the 50 state constitutions. Each volume in this innovative series contains a historical overview of the state's constitutional development, a section-by-section analysis of its current constitution, and a comprehensive guide to further research. Under the expert editorship of Professor Lawrence Friedman of New England Law School | Boson, this series provides essential reference tools for understanding state constitutional law. Books in the series can be purchased individually or as part of a complete set, giving readers unmatched access to these important political documents.

State Constitutional LawState Constitutional Law



In this, the second edition of State Constitutional Law: The Modern Experience, the authors present cases, scholarly writings, and other materials about our ever-evolving, ever-more-relevant state charters of government.

Author: Randy J. Holland

Publisher: West Academic Publishing

ISBN: 163459682X

Category:

Page: 1099

View: 277

In this, the second edition of State Constitutional Law: The Modern Experience, the authors present cases, scholarly writings, and other materials about our ever-evolving, ever-more-relevant state charters of government. The casebook starts by placing state constitutions in context--in the context of a federal system that leaves some powers exclusively with the States, delegates some powers exclusively to the Federal Government, and permits overlapping authority by both sovereigns in many areas. The resulting combination of state and federal charters--what might be called American Constitutional Law--presents fruitful opportunities for give and take, for exporting and importing constitutional tools and insights between and among the different sovereigns. The casebook often addresses the point by explaining how the U.S. Constitution deals with an issue before discussing how the state constitutions handle an identical or similar issue. At other times, the casebook explains and illustrates how the state constitutions contain provisions that have no parallel in the U.S. Constitution. A central theme of the book, explored in the context of a variety of constitutional guarantees, is that state constitutions provide a rich source of rights independent of the federal constitution. Considerable space is devoted to the reasons why a state court might construe the liberty and property rights found in their constitutions, to use two prominent examples, more broadly than comparable rights found in the U.S. Constitution. Among the reasons considered are: differences in the text between the state and federal constitutional provisions, the smaller scope of the state courts' jurisdiction, state constitutional history, unique state traditions and customs, and disagreement with the U.S. Supreme Court's interpretation of similar language. State constitutional law, like its federal counterpart, is not confined to individual rights. The casebook also explores the organization and structure of state and local governments, the method of choosing state judges, the many executive-branch powers found in state constitutions but not in their federal counterpart, the ease with which most state constitutions can be amended, and other topics, such as taxation, public finance and school funding. The casebook is not parochial. It looks at these issues through the lens of important state court decisions from nearly every one of our 50 States. In that sense, it is designed for a survey course, one that does not purport to cover any one State's constitution in detail but that considers the kinds of provisions found in many state charters. Like a traditional contracts, real property or torts textbook, the casebook uses the most interesting state court decisions from around the country to illustrate the astonishing array of state constitutional issues at play in American Constitutional Law. It is difficult to overstate the growing significance of state constitutional law. Many of the ground-breaking constitutional debates of the day are being aired in the state courts under their own constitutions--often as a prelude to debates about whether to nationalize this or that right under the National Constitution. To use the most salient example, it is doubtful that there would have been a national right to marriage equality in 2015, see Obergefell v. Hodges, without the establishment of a Massachusetts right to marry in 2003, see Goodridge v. Department of Public Health. In other areas of constitutional litigation--gun rights, capital punishment, property rights, school funding, free exercise claims, to name but a few--state courts often are the key innovators as well, relying on their own constitutions to address individual rights and structural debates of the twenty-first century. The mission of the casebook is to introduce students to this increasingly significant body of American law and to prepare them to practic

State Constitutional LawState Constitutional Law



This new case book addresses the constitutions of the 50 States.

Author: Randy James Holland

Publisher: West Academic

ISBN: STANFORD:36105134514467

Category:

Page: 1004

View: 737

This new case book addresses the constitutions of the 50 States. It is designed for a survey course, one that does not purport to cover every State's constitution in detail. Rather, like a traditional contracts, real property or torts textbook, it uses the most interesting state court decisions from around the country to illustrate the astonishing array of state constitutional issues at play in modern American law. The method of presentation emphasizes the function of state constitutions in our federal system. It sometimes does so by explaining how the U.S. Constitution deals with an issue before discussing how the state constitutions handle it, and it sometimes does so by explaining how the state constitutions contain provisions that have no parallel in the U.S. Constitution. A central theme of the book, explored in a variety of areas, is that state constitutions provide a source of rights independent of the Federal Constitution, and state courts frequently construe these provisions to grant more expansive protection for individual rights than the Federal Constitution provides. As the reader will see, the state courts' expansion of liberty and property rights under their constitutions stems from a variety of factors: differences in the text between the state and federal constitutional provisions, the smaller size of the state courts' jurisdiction, state constitutional history, unique state traditions and disagreement with the U.S. Supreme Court's interpretation of similar language. State constitutional law, like its federal counterpart, is not limited to individual rights. The book also explores the organization and structure of state and local governments, the method of choosing state judges, the ease with which most state constitutions can be amended, taxation, public finance and school funding. As the nightly news confirms, it is no exaggeration to say that many of the most ground-breaking constitutional debates of the day are being aired in the state courts under their own constitutions. The mission of this book is to introduce students to this increasingly significant body of American law and to prepare them to practice effectively in it.

The Law of American State ConstitutionsThe Law of American State Constitutions



This book provides complete coverage of American State Constitutional Law, contrasting it with the more familiar federal Constitution and explaining the importance of the differences.

Author: Robert Forrest Williams

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195343083

Category:

Page: 450

View: 486

This book provides complete coverage of American State Constitutional Law, contrasting it with the more familiar federal Constitution and explaining the importance of the differences. It surveys the law from before adoption of the federal constitution until the present and studies how it has evolved.

New Frontiers of State Constitutional LawNew Frontiers of State Constitutional Law



Chapters featured in this title include: 'Dual Enforcement of Constitutional Norms', 'Cool Federalism and the Life Cycle of Moral Progress', 'Why Federalism and Constitutional Positivism Don't Mix', and 'Interjurisdictional Enforcement of ...

Author: James A. Gardner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195368321

Category:

Page: 190

View: 491

Chapters featured in this title include: 'Dual Enforcement of Constitutional Norms', 'Cool Federalism and the Life Cycle of Moral Progress', 'Why Federalism and Constitutional Positivism Don't Mix', and 'Interjurisdictional Enforcement of Rights in a Post-erie World', amongst others.

Toward a Usable PastToward a Usable Past



In this book, major scholars and legal practitioners discuss state protections of civil liberty, and ponder the contemporary implications of the state record.

Author: Paul Finkelman

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820334967

Category:

Page: 464

View: 472

The United States Supreme Court's relegation of many rights to definition under state constitutional law, combined with the tendency of recent administrations to entrust the states with the task of preserving individual rights, is increasingly making state constitutions the arena where the battles to preserve the rights to life, liberty, property, due process, and equal protection of laws must be fought. Ranging in time from the late 1700s to the late 1900s, Toward a Usable Past offers a series of case studies that examine the protection afforded individual rights by state constitutions and state constitutional law. As it explores the history of liberty at the state level, this volume also investigates the promise and risks of turning to state constitutions to guarantee and expand individual rights. In this book, major scholars and legal practitioners discuss state protections of civil liberty, and ponder the contemporary implications of the state record. The cases examined cover topics ranging from religion in schools during the Federalist era to criminal justice in the late nineteenth century, from racial integration in Kansas before Brown v. Board of Education to legal battles over birth control in the Connecticut Supreme Court. The introduction presents the historical and contemporary significance of the topic and traces the evolution of the federal constitutional law establishing the parameters of state regulation of individual rights.

The North Carolina State ConstitutionThe North Carolina State Constitution



Each volume in this innovative series contains a historical overview of the state's constitutional development, a section-by-section analysis of its current constitution, and a comprehensive guide to further research.

Author: John V. Orth

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199915149

Category:

Page: 255

View: 665

North Carolina's state constitution charts the evolution over two centuries of a modern representative democracy. In The North Carolina State Constitution, John V. Orth and Paul M. Newby provide an outstanding constitutional and historical account of the state's governing charter. In addition to an overview of North Carolina's constitutional history, it provides an in-depth, section-by-section analysis of the entire constitution, detailing the many significant changes that have been made since its initial drafting. This treatment, along with a table of cases, index, and bibliography provides an unsurpassed reference guide for students, scholars, and practitioners of North Carolina's constitution. Co-authored by Paul M. Newby, a sitting justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court, the second edition includes significant constitutional amendments adopted since the date of the first edition. Almost every article was affected by the changes. Some were minor-such as the lengthening the term of magistrates-and some were more significant, such as spelling out the rights of victims of crimes. One was obviously major: granting the governor the power to veto legislation-making North Carolina's governor the last American governor to be given that power. In addition, the North Carolina Supreme Court has continued the seemingly never-ending process of constitutional interpretation. Some judicial decisions answered fairly routine questions about the powers of office, such as the governor's clemency power. Others were politically contentious, such as deciding the constitutional constraints on legislative redistricting. And one continues to have momentous consequences for public education, recognizing the state's constitutional duty to provide every school child in North Carolina with a "sound, basic education." The Oxford Commentaries on the State Constitutions of the United States is an important series that reflects a renewed international interest in constitutional history and provides expert insight into each of the 50 state constitutions. Each volume in this innovative series contains a historical overview of the state's constitutional development, a section-by-section analysis of its current constitution, and a comprehensive guide to further research. Under the expert editorship of Professor G. Alan Tarr, Director of the Center on State Constitutional Studies at Rutgers University, this series provides essential reference tools for understanding state constitutional law. Books in the series can be purchased individually or as part of a complete set, giving readers unmatched access to these important political documents.