Racist TrademarksRacist Trademarks



Using the prominent examples of three companies - Uncle Ben's, Sarotti, and Banania - this book examines how racist trademark figures were established in the U.S., Germany, and France, and built on nation-specific processes of racial ...

Author: Malte Hinrichsen

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 9783643902856

Category:

Page: 128

View: 449

Since the beginning of commodity culture, products have been marketed with images reflecting racist concepts of otherness. Using the prominent examples of three companies - Uncle Ben's, Sarotti, and Banania - this book examines how racist trademark figures were established in the U.S., Germany, and France, and built on nation-specific processes of racial stereotyping. While it finds that the three figures mirror their national histories of slavery, Orientalism, and colonialism, the book reveals that their paths through popular culture also followed strikingly similar patterns. Conceived in an era of overt racism, each symbol was challenged by social movements over the course of the 20th century and became increasingly marginalized in promotional activities. In the early 2000s, however, all three figures were relaunched with supposedly new makeovers, hitting once again at the heart of commodity culture and illustrating the subtle prevalence of racist stereotypes. (Series: Racism Analysis - Series A: Studies - Vol. 3)

Africa in the Colonial Ages of EmpireAfrica in the Colonial Ages of Empire



Africa in the Colonial Ages of Empire is written from the perspective that the scholarly lives of academics researching on Africa are changing, constantly in flux and increasingly bound to the demands of Western colonial imperialism.

Author: Mentan, Tatah

Publisher: Langaa RPCIG

ISBN: 9789956764099

Category:

Page: 506

View: 820

Words like “colonialism” and “empire” were once frowned upon in the U.S. and other Western mainstream media as worn-out left-wing rhetoric that didn’t fit reality. Not anymore! Tatah Mentan observes that a growing chorus of right-wing ideologues, with close ties to the Western administrations’ war-making hawks in NATO, are encouraging Washington and the rest of Europe to take pride in the expansion of their power over people and nations around the globe. Africa in the Colonial Ages of Empire is written from the perspective that the scholarly lives of academics researching on Africa are changing, constantly in flux and increasingly bound to the demands of Western colonial imperialism. This existential situation has forced the continent to morph into a tool in the hands of Colonial Empire. According to Tatah Mentan, the effects of this existential situation of Africa compel serious academic scrutiny. At the same time, inquiry into the African predicament has been changing and evolving within and against the rhythms of this “new normal” of Colonial Empire-Old or New. The author insists that the long and bloody history of imperial conquest that began with the dawn of capitalism needs critical scholarly examination. As Marx wrote in Capital: “The discovery of gold and silver in America, the extirpation, enslavement and entombment in mines of the aboriginal population, the beginning of the conquest and looting of the East Indies, the turning of Africa into a warren for the commercial hunting of black-skins, signaled the rosy dawn of the era of capitalist production. These idyllic proceedings are the chief moment of primitive accumulation.” Africa in the Colonial Ages of Empire is therefore a MUST-READ for faculty, students as well as policy makers alike in the changing dynamics of their profession, be it theoretically, methodologically, or structurally and materially.

Exquisite SlavesExquisite Slaves



In Exquisite Slaves, Tamara J. Walker examines how slaves used elegant clothing as a language for expressing attitudes about gender and status in the wealthy urban center of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Lima, Peru.

Author: Tamara J. Walker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316033555

Category:

Page:

View: 742

In Exquisite Slaves, Tamara J. Walker examines how slaves used elegant clothing as a language for expressing attitudes about gender and status in the wealthy urban center of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Lima, Peru. Drawing on traditional historical research methods, visual studies, feminist theory, and material culture scholarship, Walker argues that clothing was an emblem of not only the reach but also the limits of slaveholders' power and racial domination. Even as it acknowledges the significant limits imposed on slaves' access to elegant clothing, Exquisite Slaves also showcases the insistence and ingenuity with which slaves dressed to convey their own sense of humanity and dignity. Building on other scholars' work on slaves' agency and subjectivity in examining how they made use of myriad legal discourses and forums, Exquisite Slaves argues for the importance of understanding the body itself as a site of claims-making.

Colonialism and Race in Luso Hispanic LiteratureColonialism and Race in Luso Hispanic Literature



"Branche examines a wide variety of Latin American literature and discourse to show the extent and range of racist sentiments throughout the culture.

Author: Jerome Branche

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN: 0826264875

Category:

Page: 292

View: 868

"Branche examines a wide variety of Latin American literature and discourse to show the extent and range of racist sentiments throughout the culture. He argues that racism in the modern period (1415-1948) was a tool used to advance Spanish and Portuguese expansion, colonial enterprise, and the international development of capitalism"--Provided by publisher.

The Smell of SlaveryThe Smell of Slavery



Slavery, capitalism, and colonialism were understood as racially justified through false olfactory perceptions of African bodies throughout the Atlantic World.

Author: Andrew Kettler

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108490733

Category:

Page: 248

View: 125

Slavery, capitalism, and colonialism were understood as racially justified through false olfactory perceptions of African bodies throughout the Atlantic World.

Settler Colonialism Race and the LawSettler Colonialism Race and the Law



Natsu Taylor Saito attributes the origins and persistence of racialized inequities in the United States to the prerogatives asserted by its predominantly Angloamerican colonizers to appropriate Indigenous lands and resources, to profit from ...

Author: Natsu Taylor Saito

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814708026

Category:

Page:

View: 753

How taking Indigenous sovereignty seriously can help dismantle the structural racism encountered by other people of color in the United States Settler Colonialism, Race, and the Law provides a timely analysis of structural racism at the intersection of law and colonialism. Noting the grim racial realities still confronting communities of color, and how they have not been alleviated by constitutional guarantees of equal protection, this book suggests that settler colonial theory provides a more coherent understanding of what causes and what can help remediate racial disparities. Saito attributes the origins and persistence of racialized inequities in the United States to the prerogatives asserted by its predominantly Angloamerican colonizers to appropriate Indigenous lands and resources, to profit from the labor of voluntary and involuntary migrants, and to ensure that all people of color remain “in their place.” By providing a functional analysis that links disparate forms of oppression, this book makes the case for the oft-cited proposition that racial justice is indivisible, focusing particularly on the importance of acknowledging and contesting the continued colonization of Indigenous peoples and lands. Settler Colonialism, Race, and the Law concludes that rather than relying on promises of formal equality, we will more effectively dismantle structural racism in America by envisioning what the right of all peoples to self-determination means in a settler colonial state.

Racism Slavery and LiteratureRacism Slavery and Literature



This volume is not only meant to address important matters of the past but also of the present and future as racism, ethnic relations, and cultural identity - with the attendant issues of human rights, freedom, and emancipation - will ...

Author: Wolfgang Zach

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 3631590458

Category:

Page: 266

View: 624

The papers presented here offer a major challenge to previously conceived ideas about issues like slavery, racism, ethnic relations, nationalism, and cultural identity generating responses, critiques, revisions, counterarguments, and new perspectives. This volume is not only meant to address important matters of the past but also of the present and future as racism, ethnic relations, and cultural identity - with the attendant issues of human rights, freedom, and emancipation - will assume an ever-increasing significance in our globalised but ethically, socially, and culturally divided world. The volume is subdivided into three sections: «Racism and Nationalism» containing papers dealing with issues of racism and nationalism in a broader context, «Slavery: From Past to Present» exploring the concept of slavery in different literary genres and historical periods, «Cultural Identity and Ethnic Relations» dealing with cultural memory, nationalism, and relations between cultural and ethnic groups.

The New Age of EmpireThe New Age of Empire



The New Age of Empire is a damning indictment of white-centered ideologies from Marxism to neoliberalism, and a reminder that our histories are never really over.

Author: Kehinde Andrews

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781645036906

Category:

Page: 288

View: 417

A damning exploration of the many ways in which the effects and logic of anti-black colonialism continue to inform our modern world. Colonialism and imperialism are often thought to be distant memories, whether they're glorified in Britain's collective nostalgia or taught as a sin of the past in history classes. This idea is bolstered by the emergence of India, China, Argentina and other non-western nations as leading world powers. Multiculturalism, immigration and globalization have led traditionalists to fear that the west is in decline and that white people are rapidly being left behind; progressives and reactionaries alike espouse the belief that we live in a post-racial society. But imperialism, as Kehinde Andrews argues, is alive and well. It's just taken a new form: one in which the U.S. and not Europe is at the center of Western dominion, and imperial power looks more like racial capitalism than the expansion of colonial holdings. The International Monetary Fund, World Bank, World Trade Organization and even the United Nations are only some of these modern mechanisms of Western imperialism. Yet these imperialist logics and tactics are not limited to just the west or to white people, as in the neocolonial relationship between China and Africa. Diving deep into the concepts of racial capitalism and racial patriarchy, Andrews adds nuance and context to these often over-simplified narratives, challenging the right and the left in equal measure. Andrews takes the reader from genocide to slavery to colonialism, deftly explaining the histories of these phenomena, how their justifications are linked, and how they continue to shape our world to this day. The New Age of Empire is a damning indictment of white-centered ideologies from Marxism to neoliberalism, and a reminder that our histories are never really over.

Medical ApartheidMedical Apartheid



No one concerned with issues of public health and racial justice can afford not to read this masterful book that will stir up both controversy and long-needed debate.

Author: Harriet A. Washington

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780767929394

Category:

Page: 512

View: 320

The first full history of Black America’s shocking mistreatment as unwilling and unwitting experimental subjects at the hands of the medical establishment. No one concerned with issues of public health and racial justice can afford not to read this masterful book that will stir up both controversy and long-needed debate. From the era of slavery to the present day, starting with the earliest encounters between Black Americans and Western medical researchers and the racist pseudoscience that resulted, Medical Apartheid details the ways both slaves and freedmen were used in hospitals for experiments conducted without their knowledge—a tradition that continues today within some black populations. It reveals how Blacks have historically been prey to grave-robbing as well as unauthorized autopsies and dissections. Moving into the twentieth century, it shows how the pseudoscience of eugenics and social Darwinism was used to justify experimental exploitation and shoddy medical treatment of Blacks. Shocking new details about the government’s notorious Tuskegee experiment are revealed, as are similar, less-well-known medical atrocities conducted by the government, the armed forces, prisons, and private institutions. The product of years of prodigious research into medical journals and experimental reports long undisturbed, Medical Apartheid reveals the hidden underbelly of scientific research and makes possible, for the first time, an understanding of the roots of the African American health deficit. At last, it provides the fullest possible context for comprehending the behavioral fallout that has caused Black Americans to view researchers—and indeed the whole medical establishment—with such deep distrust.

Once a Slave Always a SlaveOnce a Slave Always a Slave



In a world where hypocrisy and lies were elevated to an art form masquerading as "tolerance" and "politically correctness", In Once a Slave, Always a Slave, a book written by a black to other blacks (and whites, yellows and browns), Anaya ...

Author: Anaya Binta

Publisher:

ISBN: 9798635616130

Category:

Page: 50

View: 970

In a world where hypocrisy and lies were elevated to an art form masquerading as "tolerance" and "politically correctness", In Once a Slave, Always a Slave, a book written by a black to other blacks (and whites, yellows and browns), Anaya Binta, a black essayist argues that if Africa doesn't build a cognitive elite, the continent will be doomed forever. Once a Slave, Always a Slave is about slavery, history, colonization, racism and black men's incapacity to build states where most Africans would like to live, hence mass immigration from Africa to live with and obey African's former masters and complain about the racism they suffer. Once a Slave, Always a Slave is about African's favourite default mode: victimization and moral posturing and how Africans, Afro-Americans, Afro-Europeans must abandon both if they want to have meaningful changes in Africa, and in African diaspora around the world, and if they want to any chance of removing Africa's stain and its consequences in African men's lives...In Africa and all around the world. By now, of course, it should be known, that, Africa men's stain is the African Slavery that black men allowed to happenOnce a Slave, Always a Slave is a thought-provoking essay, as powerful as Aimé Césaire's "Discourse on Colonialism" and a work that may shock but which is the truth as Anaya Binta sees it, and believes All Africans should, if they want to respect the memory of those millions of Africans who were enslaved and treated as chattels.

Resurrecting SlaveryResurrecting Slavery



Resurrecting Slavery also includes in-depth interviews with French Caribbean migrants outside the commemorative movement to address the everyday racial politics of remembrance.

Author: Crystal Marie Fleming

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781439914090

Category:

Page: 276

View: 656

How can politicians and ordinary citizens face the racial past in a country that frames itself as colorblind? In her timely and provocative book, Resurrecting Slavery, Crystal Fleming shows how people make sense of slavery in a nation where talking about race, colonialism, and slavery remains taboo. Noting how struggles over the meaning of racial history are informed by contemporary politics of race, she asks: What kinds of group identities are at stake today for activists and French people with ties to overseas territories where slavery took place? Fleming investigates the connections and disconnections that are made between racism, slavery, and colonialism in France. She provides historical context and examines how politicians and commemorative activists interpret the racial past and present. Resurrecting Slavery also includes in-depth interviews with French Caribbean migrants outside the commemorative movement to address the everyday racial politics of remembrance. Bringing a critical race perspective to the study of French racism, Fleming’s groundbreaking study provides a more nuanced understanding of race in France along with new ways of thinking about the global dimensions of slavery, anti-blackness, and white supremacy.

Racism and ColonialismRacism and Colonialism



1. REFLECTIONS ON A THEME by ROBERT ROSS This book, the fourth in the series Comparative Studies in Overseas History, and, like its predecessors, the product of a symposium held by the Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, is ...

Author: R.J. Ross

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9789400975446

Category:

Page: 228

View: 983

1. REFLECTIONS ON A THEME by ROBERT ROSS This book, the fourth in the series Comparative Studies in Overseas History, and, like its predecessors, the product of a symposium held by the Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, is organised around a single theme, the relationship between the ideological structures of domination and oppression that have come to be called racism and the political and economic ones which grew out of Europe's conquering and ruling much of the rest of the world. By racism, we mean those systems of thought in which group characteristics of human beings, of a non-somatic nature, are considered to be fixed by principles of descent and in which, in general, physical attributes (other than those of sex) are the main sign by which characteristics are attributed. In addition, almost by definition, the systems of thought entailed in this require that there is a hierarchy of the various races, and that those people in the lower ranks of that hierarchy are seriously disadvantaged, at least if the proponents of racist thought are able to impose their will on the society in which they live. ! The exclusion of the discrimination of women from the concept of racism should not be thought as entailing that racist and sexist ideas do not have much in common, since both derive from essentially biological determinism, and indeed 2 racist societies have historically almost invariably been strongly sexist.

Race Culture and Portuguese Colonialism in Cabo VerdeRace Culture and Portuguese Colonialism in Cabo Verde



Davis , David Brion 1974 Slavery and the Post World War II Historians . In Slavery
Colonialism and Racism . Sidney Mintz , ed . Pp . 1 - 16 . New York : Norton . De
craene , Phillippe 1977 Facing up to Drought - - and Independence .

Author: Deirdre Meintel

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: STANFORD:36105081568896

Category:

Page: 201

View: 298

Cultivating RaceCultivating Race



In Cultivating Race: The Expansion of Slavery in Georgia, 1750--1860, Watson W. Jennison explores the centrality of race in the development of Georgia, arguing that long-term structural and demographic changes account for this ...

Author: Watson W. Jennison

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813140216

Category:

Page: 440

View: 105

From the eighteenth century to the eve of the Civil War, Georgia's racial order shifted from the somewhat fluid conception of race prevalent in the colonial era to the harsher understanding of racial difference prevalent in the antebellum era. In Cultivating Race: The Expansion of Slavery in Georgia, 1750--1860, Watson W. Jennison explores the centrality of race in the development of Georgia, arguing that long-term structural and demographic changes account for this transformation. Jennison traces the rise of rice cultivation and the plantation complex in low country Georgia in the mid-eighteenth century and charts the spread of slavery into the up country in the decades that followed. Cultivating Race examines the "cultivation" of race on two levels: race as a concept and reality that was created, and race as a distinct social order that emerged because of the specifics of crop cultivation. Using a variety of primary documents including newspapers, diaries, correspondence, and plantation records, Jennison offers an in-depth examination of the evolution of racism and racial ideology in the lower South.