Spectacle and Display A Modern History of Britain s Roman Mosaic PavementsSpectacle and Display A Modern History of Britain s Roman Mosaic Pavements



A Framework for the Documentation of in situ mosaic conservation projects ... Rome: ICCM. Cosh, S.R. 2002. Cover buildings over Romano-British Mosaics. Mosaic 29: 4-8. Cosh, S.R. 2006. Lucullus at Fishbourne. ... Vol IV Western Britain.

Author: Michael Dawson

Publisher: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 9781789698329

Category:

Page: 256

View: 391

Antiquarian interest in the Roman period mosaics of Britain began in the 16th century. This book is the first to explore responses and attitudes to mosaics, not just at the point of discovery but during their subsequent history. It is a field which has received scant attention and provides a compelling insight into the agency of these remains.

The Real Lives of Roman BritainThe Real Lives of Roman Britain



Frere, S.S., and Tomlin, R.S.O., eds (1992) The Roman Inscriptions of Britain, Volume II, Fascicule 4: Wooden ... Cosh, S.R., and Neal, D.S. (2010) Roman Mosaics of Britain, Volume IV: Western Britain, Society of Antiquaries, London.

Author: Guy De la Bédoyère

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300207194

Category:

Page: 241

View: 285

An innovative, informative, and entertaining history of Roman Britain told through the lives of individuals in all walks of life The Britain of the Roman Occupation is, in a way, an age that is dark to us. While the main events from 55 BC to AD 410 are little disputed, and the archaeological remains of villas, forts, walls, and cities explain a great deal, we lack a clear sense of individual lives. This book is the first to infuse the story of Britannia with a beating heart, the first to describe in detail who its inhabitants were and their place in our history. A lifelong specialist in Romano-British history, Guy de la Bédoyère is the first to recover the period exclusively as a human experience. He focuses not on military campaigns and imperial politics but on individual, personal stories. Roman Britain is revealed as a place where the ambitious scramble for power and prestige, the devout seek solace and security through religion, men and women eke out existences in a provincial frontier land. De la Bédoyère introduces Fortunata the slave girl, Emeritus the frustrated centurion, the grieving father Quintus Corellius Fortis, and the brilliant metal worker Boduogenus, among numerous others. Through a wide array of records and artifacts, the author introduces the colorful cast of immigrants who arrived during the Roman era while offering an unusual glimpse of indigenous Britons, until now nearly invisible in histories of Roman Britain.

The Archaeological and Forensic Applications of Microfossils A Deeper Understanding of Human History The Archaeological and Forensic Applications of MicrofossilsThe Archaeological and Forensic Applications of Microfossils A Deeper Understanding of Human History The Archaeological and Forensic Applications of Microfossils



Roman Mosaics of Britain. Volume IV: Western Britain. Society of Antiquaries, London. Cunliffe, B.W. 1998. Fishbourne Roman Palace. Tempus, Stroud. Ellis, P.J. 1987. Sea Mills, Bristol: the 1965–1968 excavations in the Roman Town of ...

Author: M. Williams

Publisher: Geological Society of London

ISBN: 9781786203052

Category:

Page: 304

View: 861

Microfossils are an abundant component of the sedimentary rock record. Their analysis can reveal not only the environments in which the rocks were deposited, but also their age. When combined, the spatial and temporal distribution patterns of microfossils offer enormous utility for archaeological and forensic investigations. Their presence can act as a geological ‘fingerprint’ and the tiniest fragment of material, such as a broken Iron Age potsherd, can contain a microfossil signature that reveals the geographical source of the materials under investigation. This book explores how microfossils are employed as tools to interpret human society and habitation throughout history. Examples include microfossil evidence associated with Palaeolithic human occupation at Boxgrove in Sussex, alongside investigations into human-induced landscape change during the Holocene. Further examples include the use of microfossils to provenance the source materials of Iron Age ceramics, Roman mosaics and Minoan pottery, in addition to their application to help solve modern murder cases, highlighting the diverse applications of microfossils to improving our understanding of human history.

Chedworth Life in a Roman VillaChedworth Life in a Roman Villa



Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, Vol. ... Mosaics are discussed and lavishly illustrated in S. Cosh and D. Neal, Roman Mosaics of Britain: Volume IV Western Britain (Society of Antiquaries, London, ...

Author: Simon Esmonde Cleary

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 9780752492803

Category:

Page: 192

View: 319

Chedworth is one of the few Roman villas in Britain whose remains are open to the public, and this book seeks to explain what these remains mean. The fourth century in Britain was a ‘golden age’ and at the time the Cotswolds were the richest area of Roman Britain. The wealthy owners of a villa such as Chedworth felt themselves part of an imperial Roman aristocracy. This is expressed at the villa in the layout of the buildings, rooms for receiving guests and for grand dining, the provision of baths, and the use of mosaics. The villa would also have housed the wife, family and household of the owner and been the centre of an agricultural estate. In the nineteenth century Chedworth was rediscovered, and part of the villa’s tale is the way in which it was viewed by a nineteenth-century Cotswold landowner, Lord Eldon, and then its current owners, the National Trust.

A Companion to Roman ArtA Companion to Roman Art



Volume II: South‐West Britain. Illuminata for the Society of Antiquaries of London, London. Cosh, S.R., and Neal, D.S. (2010) Roman Mosaics of Britain. Volume IV: Western Britain. Society of Antiquaries of London, London.

Author: Barbara E. Borg

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781119077893

Category:

Page: 664

View: 868

A Companion to Roman Art encompasses various artistic genres, ancient contexts, and modern approaches for a comprehensive guide to Roman art. Offers comprehensive and original essays on the study of Roman art Contributions from distinguished scholars with unrivalled expertise covering a broad range of international approaches Focuses on the socio-historical aspects of Roman art, covering several topics that have not been presented in any detail in English Includes both close readings of individual art works and general discussions Provides an overview of main aspects of the subject and an introduction to current debates in the field

Roman and Medieval Exeter and their HinterlandsRoman and Medieval Exeter and their Hinterlands



... 219–42 Cosh, S.R. and Neal, D.S. 2005 Roman mosaics of Britain. Volume II: South-West Britain London, The Society of Antiquaries of London Cosh, S.R. and Neal, D.S. 2010 Roman mosaics of Britain. Volume IV: Western Britain London ...

Author: Stephen Rippon

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN: 9781789256185

Category:

Page: 416

View: 961

This first volume, presenting research carried out through the Exeter: A Place in Time project, provides a synthesis of the development of Exeter within its local, regional, national and international hinterlands. Exeter began life in c. AD 55 as one of the most important legionary bases within early Roman Britain, and for two brief periods in the early and late 60s AD, Exeter was a critical centre of Roman power within the new province. When the legion moved to Wales the fortress was converted into the civitas capital for the Dumnonii. Its development as a town was, however, relatively slow, reflecting the gradual pace at which the region as a whole adapted to being part of the Roman world. The only evidence we have for occupation within Exeter between the 5th and 8th centuries is for a church in what was later to become the Cathedral Close. In the late 9th century, however, Exeter became a defended burh, and this was followed by the revival of urban life. Exeter’s wealth was in part derived from its central role in the south-west’s tin industry, and by the late 10th century Exeter was the fifth most productive mint in England. Exeter’s importance continued to grow as it became an episcopal and royal centre, and excavations within Exeter have revealed important material culture assemblages that reflect its role as an international port.

A Study of the Deposition and Distribution of Copper Alloy Vessels in Roman BritainA Study of the Deposition and Distribution of Copper Alloy Vessels in Roman Britain



“ Roman Britain in 2007 : Sites Explored ” . Britannia 39. 263-336 Bushe - Fox , J. 1926. ... “ Brooch use in the 4th - to 5th - century frontier ” . ... Roman Mosaics of Britain : Volume I. Society of Antiquaries London : London .

Author: Jason Lundock

Publisher: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 9781784911812

Category:

Page: 250

View: 305

This book collects together data concerning copper alloy vessels from Roman Britain and relates this evidence to prevailing theories of consumption, identity and culture change in Britain during this time.

Life Death and Rubbish Disposal in Roman Norton North YorkshireLife Death and Rubbish Disposal in Roman Norton North Yorkshire



(The Archaeology of York 4/1). London: Council for British Archaeology. ... The Roman cemetery at Lankhills (Winchester Studies 3 Pre-Roman and Roman Winchester Part II). ... Roman Mosaics of Britain Volume IV: Western Britain.

Author: Janet Phillips

Publisher: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 9781789698398

Category:

Page: 296

View: 130

This volume reports on excavations in advance of the development of a site in Norton-on-Derwent, North Yorkshire close to the line of the main Roman road running from the crossing point of the River Derwent near Malton Roman fort to York. This site provided much additional information on aspects of the poorly understood ‘small town’ of Delgovicia.

Towns in the DarkTowns in the Dark



Urban Transformations from Late Roman Britain to Anglo-Saxon England Gavin Speed. Connor, A. and Buckley, R. 1999, Roman and Medieval ... Cosh, S.R. and Neal, D.S. 2010, Roman Mosaics of Britain, Volume IV: West Britain. Oxbow, Oxford.

Author: Gavin Speed

Publisher: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 9781784910051

Category:

Page: 205

View: 944

The focus of this book is to draw together still scattered data to chart and interpret the changing nature of life in towns from the late Roman period through to the mid-Anglo-Saxon period. Did towns fail? Were these ruinous sites really neglected by early Anglo-Saxon settlers and leaders?

Wroxeter the Cornovii and the Urban Process Volume 2 Characterizing the City Final Report of the Wroxeter Hinterland Project 1994 1997Wroxeter the Cornovii and the Urban Process Volume 2 Characterizing the City Final Report of the Wroxeter Hinterland Project 1994 1997



Cosh, S.R. and White, R.H 2006 'A rediscovered mosaic Insula XXVI' in P. Ellis and R.H. White (eds.), 141–7. Cosh, S.R. and Neal, D.S. 2010 Roman Mosaics of Britain Volume IV Western Britain Society of Antiquaries of London.

Author: R. H. White

Publisher: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd

ISBN: 9781784910747

Category:

Page: 239

View: 966

In the mid-1990s, the site of the Roman city of Viroconium Cornoviorum at Wroxeter, Shropshire, was subjected to intensive geophysical survey. This volume reports on the archaeological interpretation of this work, marrying the geophysical data with a detailed analysis of the existing aerial photographic record created by Arnold Baker 1950s-1980s.