Railroads Depots of Northwest OhioRailroads Depots of Northwest Ohio



Five REUSE OF DEPOTS Around 50 passenger and combination railroad depots remain standing in this part of Ohio ; obviously many have disappeared . After closure by the railroad , depots become an unnecessary tax burden and are usually ...

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738534013

Category:

Page: 132

View: 720

Chartered as early as 1832, Northwestern Ohio railroads were among the first in the Midwest. Toledo, a rapidly developing lake port at the mouth of the Maumee River, was the destination point for many lines; others were just passing through on their way to Chicago and points west. By 1907, 20 lines served the northwestern counties. All had a series of stations along their lines, often with depots or other railroad structures. Although many have come and gone, Northwest Ohio was once home to over 250 passenger or combination depots serving the traveling public. Railroad Depots of Northwest Ohio relives the golden age of railroad travel through vintage postcards and mid-20th century photos of selected depots and related structures.

Railroad Depots of Northeast OhioRailroad Depots of Northeast Ohio



Over 310 passenger and combination depots were established at various points along the railroads to serve the needs of passengers traveling throughout northeast Ohio . Depots were the focal point of communities — news arrived over their ...

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738551155

Category:

Page: 132

View: 281

The first rail lines in northeast Ohio opened for business in July 1850, and by the 1890s, northeast Ohio was laced with railroad tracks. Cleveland was the hub of railroad activity, and important rail-served lake ports developed at Ashtabula, Conneaut, Fairport Harbor, Huron, and Lorain. Akron became a center of southerly east-west lines. Over 310 passenger and combination depots were established at various points along the railroads to serve the needs of passengers traveling throughout northeast Ohio. Depots were the focal point of communities--news arrived over their telegraphs, traveling salesmen gathered on the trackside platforms, depot staff maneuvered four-wheel wagons loaded with baggage, parcels, and milk cans, locals gathered to meet, greet, and send off family and friends. The depot was a veritable beehive of activity at train time. Railroad Depots of Northeast Ohio offers a glimpse into these golden years of train travel through the use of early postcards and photographs of selected depots and related structures.

Railroad Depots of Central OhioRailroad Depots of Central Ohio



Mark J. Camp teaches geology at the University of Toledo and serves as a national director of the Railroad Station Historical Society. His other titles include Railroad Depots of Northwest Ohio, Railroad Depots of West Central Ohio, ...

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781439636893

Category:

Page: 128

View: 410

By the mid-1850s, the railroad craze had hit central Ohio. Pioneer railroads that were to evolve into portions of the Baltimore and Ohio, New York Central, and Pennsylvania Railroads connected the state capital, Columbus, with the canals, Lake Erie, and the Ohio River. The region was crisscrossed by numerous other lines by 1880; Columbus became the main hub while other railroad centers included Circleville, Delaware, Mansfield, Mount Vernon, Newark, and Zanesville. Hundreds of depots were built throughout central Ohio to serve railroad passengers and to handle baggage, mail, and freight. Depots became the center of commerce and activity at communities—big and small. With the discontinuance of passenger trains across the Buckeye State, many depots disappeared from trackside—many simply demolished, others relocated for non-railroad uses. Railroad Depots of Central Ohio offers a pictorial history of selected depots, centering around Columbus and Franklin County, using old postcards and vintage photographs.

Railroad Depots of West Central OhioRailroad Depots of West Central Ohio



WEST CENTRAL OHIO T. " welve railroad lines served west central Ohio around 1907 and were the lifeblood of the communities ... of the Railroad Station Historical Society and also authored Railroad Depots of Northwest Ohio for Arcadia .

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738540099

Category:

Page: 132

View: 799

Twelve railroad lines served west central Ohio around 1907 and were the lifeblood of the communities they ran through. Bellefontaine, Bradford, and Crestline became major terminals, and lesser known places like Dola, Ohio City, and Peoria also owe their existence to the iron horse. Around 300 depots served the west central region, with the earliest dating to the late 1840s. The depot was the center of activity in the smallest village to the largest city. Many of the depots no longer exist--victims of progress, nature, or neglect. Some survive as historical museums, various businesses, and residences; a few remain in railroad use. The proud history of railroading lives on in the restored depots at Bucyrus and Galion--two architectural gems of the Buckeye State. Railroad Depots of West Central Ohio shares a tale of the golden age of rail travel through vintage postcards and mid-20th-century photographs of selected depots and other railroad structures.

Railroad Depots of Central OhioRailroad Depots of Central Ohio



Railroad Depots of Central Ohio offers a pictorial history of selected depots, centering around Columbus and Franklin County, using old postcards and vintage photographs.

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738561746

Category:

Page: 132

View: 514

By the mid-1850s, the railroad craze had hit central Ohio. Pioneer railroads that were to evolve into portions of the Baltimore and Ohio, New York Central, and Pennsylvania Railroads connected the state capital, Columbus, with the canals, Lake Erie, and the Ohio River. The region was crisscrossed by numerous other lines by 1880; Columbus became the main hub while other railroad centers included Circleville, Delaware, Mansfield, Mount Vernon, Newark, and Zanesville. Hundreds of depots were built throughout central Ohio to serve railroad passengers and to handle baggage, mail, and freight. Depots became the center of commerce and activity at communities--big and small. With the discontinuance of passenger trains across the Buckeye State, many depots disappeared from trackside--many simply demolished, others relocated for non-railroad uses. Railroad Depots of Central Ohio offers a pictorial history of selected depots, centering around Columbus and Franklin County, using old postcards and vintage photographs.

Railroad Depots of Southwest OhioRailroad Depots of Southwest Ohio



The next year , the Dayton and Michigan Railroad began to build north up the Great Miami River Valley . ... Today the only passenger depot in town is the Bowling Green depot relocated from northwest Ohio to Carillon Park .

Author: Mark J. Camp

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738584150

Category:

Page: 132

View: 144

Springfield was the original destination of the two oldest railroad companies to lay rails in Ohio, the Mad River and Lake Erie Railroad and the Little Miami Railroad. This would form the first rail link between Lake Erie and the Ohio River. Other routes became more important as rails eventually spread like spokes of a wheel from Cincinnati, and connections were made to Akron, Chicago, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Indianapolis, Lexington, Louisville, Marietta, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, and Toledo as well as many other cities by the late 1800s. Hundreds of depots were erected to serve train travelers, ranging from the smallest shelter to the standard combined passenger-freight building to the major city passenger terminal. Cincinnati, Dayton, and Springfield became railroad centers, and towns like Blanchester, Hamilton, Loveland, Middletown, Morrow, Wilmington, and Xenia, served by more than one line, became busy transfer points. With the decline of rail passenger service, depots became unnecessary--many were demolished. Railroad Depots of Southwest Ohio presents a pictorial look at a sampling of these grand structures when they were in their prime.

Railroad Depots of Northwest PennsylvaniaRailroad Depots of Northwest Pennsylvania



Another north-south line in Northwest Pennsylvania was the Allegheny Valley Railroad, which tapped into the oil region of ... the Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad, which runs from Conneaut, Ohio, to Pittsburgh and through three Northwest ...

Author: Dan West

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781467105774

Category:

Page: 128

View: 564

From 1860 until the decline of the railroads nearly 100 years later, Pennsylvania led the nation in railroad miles. The zenith came in 1920, when the state boasted 11,500 miles of track. The northwest corner of the state was home to the Pennsylvania oil rush in the late 19th century, coal mines, timber forests, and stone quarries. The landscape was dotted with railroad depots every couple of miles. These depots were waypoints for business transactions, family reunions, outings to amusement parks, and soldiers leaving for or returning from service; they also became hangouts for pickpockets, targets for nighttime burglars, and sometimes storage sheds for explosives. Although Pennsylvania still has over 5,000 miles of track, only a few stations remain, and most of them have been repurposed as museums and businesses. This book captures the stories these stations told when rail was king in the early 20th century.

Results of Magnetic Observations Made by the United States Coast and Geodetic SurveyResults of Magnetic Observations Made by the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey



The lot is about five - eighths of a mile south of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad depot , northwest of the intersection of two roads . The station is 97 feet north of the center of the east and west road which runs out to Kunzes Lake ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: OSU:32435031377021

Category:

Page:

View: 864

Results of Magnetic Observations Made by the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1918Results of Magnetic Observations Made by the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1918



The lot is about five - eighths of a mile south of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad depot , northwest of the intersection of two roads . The station is 97 feet north of the center of the east and west road which runs out to Kunzes Lake ...

Author: Daniel Lyman Hazard

Publisher:

ISBN: PSU:000071905396

Category:

Page: 32

View: 925