Postwar ArtilleryPostwar Artillery



Organized chronologically, the book is a comprehensive survey of units and their artillery weapons by war, including Korea, Vietnam, the Arab-Israeli conflicts, Indo-Pakistan wars, the cold war in Europe, the Yugoslav civil war, the Iraq ...

Author: Michael E. Haskew

Publisher: Amber

ISBN: 1907446605

Category:

Page: 192

View: 208

A highly-illustrated guide to the world's artillery units and their weapons and equipment from the end of World War II, Postwar Artillery 1945-Present: The Essential Weapons Identification Guide includes sample unit structures and orders of battle from divisional to corps and army level, providing an organizational context for key wars fought since 1945. Organized chronologically, the book is a comprehensive survey of units and their artillery weapons by war, including Korea, Vietnam, the Arab-Israeli conflicts, Indo-Pakistan wars, the cold war in Europe, the Yugoslav civil war, the Iraq wars and Afghanistan. All the major guns, missiles and mortar types are featured, with both towed and self-propelled artillery, for example, as well as anti-tank, anti-aircraft and other infantry support weapons. Less conventional forms of artillery are also included, including tactical and strategic missile systems, all combining to make this a rounded compendium of modern artillery weapons as used by the world's armed forces. Packed with more than 200 full-color artworks and photographs with exhaustive specifications, Postwar Artillery 1945-Present is a key reference guide for military modellers and artillery enthusiasts.

Modern Tanks and Artillery 1945 PresentModern Tanks and Artillery 1945 Present



"The material in this volume has previously appeared in: The essential vehicle identification guide: postwar armored fighting vehicles 1945-present and The essential weapons identification guide: postwar artillery 1945-present"--Title page ...

Author: Michael E. Haskew

Publisher: Amber

ISBN: 1782742050

Category:

Page: 384

View: 614

Illustrated with hundreds of detailed artworks of AFVs and their markings, Modern Tanks and Artillery is a comprehensive study of the armored fighting vehicles and guns of every nationality from the beginning of the Cold War to the present. The book is split into two volumes, the first detailing tanks and AFVs, and the second covering artillery guns, rockets and self-propelled guns. Each volume is further subdivided by theater and conflict. The first volume provides a comprehensive study of the AFVs in service from the end of World War II until the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Well-known tanks deployed in various wars are included, such as the Soviet IS-3, T-54 and T-72 tanks, as well as the German Leopard, British Chieftain, and American M1A1 Abrams. The second volume provides a detailed analysis of artillery since the end of World War II, including ubiquitous workhorses such as the 2S3 (M1973) 152mm Howitzer, the FH-70 howitzer and the G5 howitzer. Rockets of various types, such as the Rapier surface-to-air missile, Pershing II ballistic missile and BM-30 Smerch multiple heavy rocket launcher are also included. Packed with more than 400 color artworks and photographs with exhaustive specifications, Modern Tanks and Artillery is a key reference for modelers and enthusiasts of modern guns and armored fighting vehicles. REVIEWS "Where the book does excel is the amount of textual information making it a useful reference work." Scale Military Modeler International

The World s Greatest TanksThe World s Greatest Tanks



From the Soviet T-34 and German Panther tanks of World War II to the M1A2 Abrams, Challenger 2 and T-90 of the present day, The World’s Greatest Tanks is an expert examination of the most successful tanks of the past hundred years.

Author: Michael E. Haskew

Publisher: Amber Books Ltd

ISBN: 9781782742647

Category:

Page: 224

View: 405

From the Soviet T-34 and German Panther tanks of World War II to the M1A2 Abrams, Challenger 2 and T-90 of the present day, The World’s Greatest Tanks is an expert examination of the most successful tanks of the past hundred years. Beginning with the prototype Mark V Male in 1917, The World’s Greatest Tanks features 52 of the best armoured fighting vehicles from World War I, World War II, through the Cold War and up to the highly sophisticated tanks that have seen recent service in wars in the Balkans, Caucasus, and Middle East. Each entry is examined over two spreads and includes a brief description of the tank’s development and history, a colour profile artwork, photographs, key features and specifications tables. Packed with more than 200 artworks and photographs, The World’s Greatest Tanks is a colourful guide for the military historian and military technology enthusiast.

Million Dollar BarrageMillion Dollar Barrage



... 70; on 4.7- inch Gun Model 1906, 72–73; and Ordnance Department, 77–79; on postwar artillery debates, 178, 180; on postwar artillery procurement ...

Author: Justin G. Prince

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806169835

Category:

Page: 272

View: 850

At the beginning of the twentieth century, field artillery was a small, separate, unsupported branch of the U.S. Army. By the end of World War I, it had become the “King of Battle,” a critical component of American military might. Million-Dollar Barrage tracks this transformation. Offering a detailed account of how American artillery crews trained, changed, adapted, and fought between 1907 and 1923, Justin G. Prince tells the story of the development of modern American field artillery—a tale stretching from the period when field artillery became an independent organization to when it became an equal branch of the U.S. Army. The field artillery entered the Great War as a relatively new branch. It separated from the Coast Artillery in 1907 and established a dedicated training school, the School of Fire at Fort Sill, in 1911. Prince describes the challenges this presented as issues of doctrine, technology, weapons development, and combat training intersected with the problems of a peacetime army with no good industrial base. His account, which draws on a wealth of sources, ranges from debates about U.S. artillery practices relative to those of Europe, to discussions of the training, equipping, and performance of the field artillery branch during the war. Prince follows the field artillery from its plunge into combat in April 1917 as an unprepared organization to its emergence that November as an effective fighting force, with the Meuse-Argonne Offensive proving the pivotal point in the branch’s fortunes. Million-Dollar Barrage provides an unprecedented analysis of the ascendance of field artillery as a key factor in the nation’s military dominance.

The organizational history of field artillery 1775 2003 Hardcover The organizational history of field artillery 1775 2003 Hardcover



guns . The trench mortar battery would then be transferred to the artillery ... far - reaching recommendations and suggestions for postwar field artillery .

Author:

Publisher: Government Printing Office

ISBN: 0160872871

Category:

Page:

View: 823

The newest volume in the Army Lineage Series, "The Organizational History of Field Artillery" addresses the need for a modern work recording the historical structure, strength, disposition, materiel, and technical and tactical doctrine of field artillery in the U.S. Army. Although several books on field artillery have appeared over the past thirty years--some popular histories and a few scholarly works--this one is intended to emphasize the organizational structure of the branch rather than its weapons or operations. The publication includes charts and tables showing the organization of field artillery over the last 225 years, as well as photographs and artwork depicting artillerymen and their weapons in both war and peace. The book was designed to complement the volume published in 1985 in the series covering the lineages and honors of Regular Army and Army Reserve field artillery regiments, which is currently being updated to include commands, brigades, groups, and regiments in all three components. This updated edition will also be published shortly by the Center of Military History. Taken together, these volumes will provide an unparalleled portrait of one of the Army's basic combat arms as it has evolved over the past two hundred fifty years.

After the TrenchesAfter the Trenches



The army's postwar artillery organization employed horse-drawn 75-mm guns for direct support of the infantry regiments and a larger gun for general support ...

Author: William O. Odom

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 160344081X

Category:

Page: 282

View: 364

At the end of the Great War, the U.S. Army faced the challenge of integrating what it had learned in the failures and ultimate success of its war effort. During the interwar years the army sought to balance readiness and modernization in a period of limited resources and technological advances with profound implications for the conduct of warfare. In After the Trenches, William O. Odom traces the development of combat doctrine between the world wars through an examination of the army's primary doctrine manuals, the Field Service Regulations. The Field Service Regulations of 1923 successfully assimilated the experiences of the First World War and translated them into viable tactical practice, Odom argues in this unique study. Rapidly developing technologies generated more efficient tools of war and greatly expanded the scale, tempo, and complexity of warfare. Personnel and material shortages led to a decline in the quality of army doctrine evidenced in the 1939 regulations. Examining the development of doctrine and the roles of key personalities such as John Pershing, Hugh Drum, George Lynch, Frank Parker, and Lesley McNair, Odom concludes that the successive revisions of the manual left the army scurrying to modernize its woefully outdated doctrine on the eve of the new war. This impressively researched study of the doctrine of the interwar army fills a significant gap in our understanding of the development of the U.S. Army during the first half of the twentieth century. It will serve scholars and others interested in military history as the standard reference on the subject. Moreover, many of the challenges and conditions that existed seventy years ago resemble those faced bytoday's army. This study of the army's historical responses to a declining military budget and an ever-changing technology will broaden the perspectives of those who must deal with these important contemporary issues.

Army Lineage SeriesArmy Lineage Series



This volume, The Organizational History of Field Artillery, 1775-2003, addresses the need for a modern work that records the historical structure, strength, disposition, materiel, and technical and tactical doctrine of artillery in the U.S. ...

Author: Department of Defense

Publisher:

ISBN: 1521059721

Category:

Page: 318

View: 747

The volume published by 1st Lt. William E. Birkhimer on the history of artillery in the United States Army was the standard work on the subject for over one hundred years. Lieutenant Birkhimer's history is a valuable contribution to understanding the background of artillery in the United States through the Civil War period, but artillery has changed radically since its publication. This volume, The Organizational History of Field Artillery, 1775-2003, addresses the need for a modern work that records the historical structure, strength, disposition, materiel, and technical and tactical doctrine of artillery in the U.S. Army. It complements the lineage volume on Regular Army and Army Reserve field artillery regiments, published in 1985 but currently being updated to include commands, brigades, groups, and regiments in all three components. In the last thirty years, several books on field artillery have appeared, some popular histories and a few scholarly works, but the focus of this volume is on the organizational structure of U.S. Army artillery rather than its weapons or its operations. In the main, the narrative is chronological, with nuclear missiles and rockets covered separately because their history did not follow that of cannon artillery. The term artillery originally referred to all engines of war designed to discharge missiles, such as the catapult, ballista, and trebuchet, among others. Toward the end of the Middle Ages, weapons employing gunpowder superseded such engines of war, and in a more restricted sense, artillery came to mean all firearms not carried and used by hand. By the mid-twentieth century, it included all manner of large guns (as distinguished from small arms), howitzers, rockets, and guided missiles, and also came to be applied to the personnel who transport and service the weapons and to the organization and branch of the Army to which the personnel are assigned. CHAPTER 1 - THE BEGINNINGS * Artillery Organization * Artillery Weapons * Artillery Employment * CHAPTER 2 - REORGANIZING THE ARM * Organizational Experimentation * The Rise of Field Artillery * The Mexican War * CHAPTER 3 - THE CIVIL WAR * The Prewar Years * Artillery Organization * From Mobile to Static Warfare * CHAPTER 4 - DIVERGING MISSIONS * Era of Slow Progress * The War With Spain * Postwar Reforms * CHAPTER 5 - A TIME OF GROWTH * Modernizing the Arm * Organizing for War * On the Battlefield * CHAPTER 6 - BETWEEN THE WARS * The Postwar Years * Motorization and Mechanization * Advances in Materiel * Organizational Developments * Training and Doctrine * CHAPTER 7 - WORLD WAR II * Infantry Division Artillery * Other Division Artillery * Nondivisional Field Artillery * On the Battlefield * CHAPTER 8 - POSTWAR REORGANIZATION * Division Artillery * Nondivisional Artillery * The Korean War * Europe and the "New Look" * CHAPTER 9 - THE NUCLEAR ARENA * Early Missile Developments * Honest John Rocket * Fielding the New Missiles * From the Redstone to Satellites * Command and Control * Lacrosse Missile * Sergeant Missile * Little John Rocket * Pershing Missile * Lance Missile * Pershing II Versus Cruise Missiles * End of an Era * CHAPTER 10 - THE ROAD TO FLEXIBLE RESPONSE * The 280-mm. Gun * Atomic Field Army * PENTANA * Division Artillery * Combat Arms Regimental System * Reorganization Objective Army Divisions * Materiel Developments * Airmobility * CHAPTER 11 - VIETNAM * Artillery Buildup * Adapting to the Environment * Redeployment * CHAPTER 12 - MODERNIZATION EFFORTS * Materiel * Force Structure * Army 86 and AirLand Battle * CHAPTER 13 - TOWARD A NEW CENTURY * Operation Desert Storm * Reorganizing the Force * Return to Iraq * In Retrospect * APPENDIX A-Chiefs of Field Artillery * APPENDIX B-Field Artillery School Commandants * BIBLIOGRAPHY * ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS

Artillery of WordsArtillery of Words



of postwar speeches, all selected and edited by Randolph Churchill. Wartime fervour, however, had quickly faded into postwar reaction and apathy, ...

Author: Frederick Woods

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473811973

Category:

Page: 192

View: 397

An analysis of the writings of the iconic twentieth-century statesman from the author of Young Winston’s Wars. Only a part-time author, Sir Winston Churchill wrote fifty books and over eight hundred feature articles. He even received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1953. Now, Frederick Woods, an internationally acknowledged expert in the field of Churchillian writings, presents a full-length appraisal of Churchill’s literary output, while putting the writings in the context of Churchill's public life. Churchill’s words were weapons, argues Mr. Woods, written deliberately to win a battle, whether that battle was over the future of India, the fate of the freedom-loving world, the rehabilitation of renowned ancestors, or his own fluctuating reputation. In every case Churchill strove mightily to win, and often presented his case with less objectivity than that expected of one popularly considered to be a major historian. Artillery of Words is not only an illuminating and often witty analysis of Churchill’s writings; it is also an important and revealing contribution to Churchillian studies in general. Praise for Frederick Woods’s A Bibliography of the Works of Sir Winston Churchill “[Reveals] a mastery of both research and presentation.” —Martin Gilbert, bestselling author of Churchill: A Life

The U S Air Service in World War I Volume IV Postwar ReviewThe U S Air Service in World War I Volume IV Postwar Review



A select group of the reports on lessons learned make up Part 1 of this volume of World War I documents on U.S. military aviation.

Author:

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN: 1428916075

Category:

Page: 638

View: 771

Following the Armistice in 1918, Maj. Gen. Mason M. Patrick, Chief of Air Service, American Expeditionary Forces, directed that a record be made of lessons learned during the war. This information, he believed, was needed for planning the Air Service of the future. The reports prepared by commanders, pilots, observers, and other members of the various Air Service units in response to General Patrick's directive are of considerable historical interest for the information they contain about the Air Service and its employment at the front. A select group of the reports on lessons learned make up Part 1 of this volume of World War I documents on U.S. military aviation. Part II is devoted to a report on the effects of Allied bombing in World War I. This long-forgotten document, the result of a post-war investigation by the Air Intelligence Section of General Headquarters, American Expeditionary Forces, is the counterpart of the well-known United States Strategic Bombing Survey of World War II.

Black Glasses Like Clark KentBlack Glasses Like Clark Kent



In Black Glasses Like Clark Kent, winner of the Graywolf Nonfiction Prize, Svoboda offers a striking and carefully wrought personal account of an often painful search for information.

Author: Terese Svoboda

Publisher: Graywolf Press

ISBN: 9781555970451

Category:

Page: 112

View: 526

After her Uncle's suicide, Terese Svoboda investigates his stunning claim that MPs may have executed their own men during the occupation of Japan after World War II [Our captain] commended us for being good soldiers and doing our job well and having a minimum of problems. Then he dropped a bomb. He said the prison was getting overcrowded, terribly overcrowded. As a child Terese Svoboda thought of her uncle as Superman, with "Black Clark Kent glasses, grapefruit-sized biceps." At eighty, he could still boast a washboard stomach, but in March 2004, he became seriously depressed. Svoboda investigates his terrifying story of what happened during his time as an MP, interviewing dozens of elderly ex-GIs and visiting Japan to try to discover the truth. In Black Glasses Like Clark Kent, winner of the Graywolf Nonfiction Prize, Svoboda offers a striking and carefully wrought personal account of an often painful search for information. She intersperses excerpts of her uncle's recordings and letters to his wife with her own research, and shows how the vagaries of military justice can allow the worst to happen and then be buried by time and protocol

MG 34 and MG 42 Machine GunsMG 34 and MG 42 Machine Guns



Featuring specially commissioned full-colour artwork and drawing upon numerous technical manuals and first-hand accounts, this study explores the technological development, varied roles and lasting influence of the revolutionary MG 34 and ...

Author: Chris McNab

Publisher: Osprey Publishing

ISBN: 1780960085

Category:

Page: 80

View: 712

With the MG 34, the German Wehrmacht introduced an entirely new concept in automatic firepower - the general-purpose machine gun (GPMG). In itself the MG 34 was an excellent weapon: an air-cooled, recoil-operated machine gun that could run through belts of 7.92mm ammunition at a rate of 850rpm, delivering killing firepower at ranges of more than 1,000m. Yet simply by changing its mount and feed mechanism, the operator could radically transform its function. On its standard bipod it was a light machine gun, ideal for infantry assaults; on a tripod it could serve as a sustained-fire medium machine gun; aircraft or vehicular mounts turned it into an air defence weapon; and it also served as the coaxial machine gun on numerous tanks. During World War II, the MG 34 was superseded (although it remained in combat use) by a new GPMG - the MG 42. The MG 42 was more efficient to manufacture and more robust, and had a blistering 1,200rpm rate of fire. Nicknamed 'Hitler's buzzsaw' by Allied troops, it was arguably the finest all-round GPMG ever produced, and alongside the MG 34 it inflicted heavy casualties on Allied soldiers on all European and North African fronts. Such were its qualities of firepower and usability that it became the foundation of an entire series of postwar machine guns, including the MG 1 and MG 3 - the latter is still in production and service to this day. Featuring specially commissioned full-colour artwork and drawing upon numerous technical manuals and first-hand accounts, this study explores the technological development, varied roles and lasting influence of the revolutionary MG 34 and MG 42 machine guns and their postwar successors.