Pax RomanaPax Romana



Acclaimed historian Adrian Goldsworthy tells the story of the creation of the Empire, revealing how and why the Romans came to control so much of the world and asking whether the favourable image of the Roman peace is a true one.

Author: Adrian Goldsworthy

Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson

ISBN: 1474604374

Category:

Page: 416

View: 991

The Pax Romana is famous for having provided a remarkable period of peace and stability, rarely seen before or since. Yet the Romans were first and foremost conquerors, imperialists who took by force a vast empire stretching from the Euphrates in the east to the Atlantic coast in the west. Their peace meant Roman victory and was brought about by strength and dominance rather than co-existence with neighbours. The Romans were aggressive and ruthless, and during the creation of their empire millions died or were enslaved. But the Pax Romana was real, not merely the boast of emperors, and some of the regions in the Empire have never again lived for so many generations free from major wars. So what exactly was the Pax Romana and what did it mean for the people who found themselves brought under Roman rule? Acclaimed historian Adrian Goldsworthy tells the story of the creation of the Empire, revealing how and why the Romans came to control so much of the world and asking whether the favourable image of the Roman peace is a true one. He chronicles the many rebellions by the conquered, and describes why these broke out and why most failed. At the same time, he explains that hostility was only one reaction to the arrival of Rome, and from the start there was alliance, collaboration and even enthusiasm for joining the invaders, all of which increased as resistance movements faded away. A ground-breaking and comprehensive history of the Roman Peace, Pax Romana takes the reader on a journey from the bloody conquests of an aggressive Republic through the age of Caesar and Augustus to the golden age of peace and prosperity under diligent emperors like Marcus Aurelius, offering a balanced and nuanced reappraisal of life in the Roman Empire.

Resisting RomeResisting Rome



Acclaimed historian Adrian Goldsworthy tells the story of the creation of the Empire, revealing how and why the Romans came to control so much of the world and asking whether the favourable image of the Roman peace is a true one.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 0297864289

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Page:

View: 531

Pax RomanaPax Romana



War, Peace and Conquest in the Roman World Adrian Goldsworthy, Dr Adrian Goldsworthy Ltd. benefit, and Romans were quite open in talking of the wealth and glory brought by empire. They also spoke a good deal about peace as the most ...

Author: Adrian Goldsworthy

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9780297864295

Category:

Page: 528

View: 392

The Pax Romana is famous for having provided a remarkable period of peace and stability, rarely seen before or since. Yet the Romans were first and foremost conquerors, imperialists who took by force a vast empire stretching from the Euphrates in the east to the Atlantic coast in the west. Their peace meant Roman victory and was brought about by strength and dominance rather than co-existence with neighbours. The Romans were aggressive and ruthless, and during the creation of their empire millions died or were enslaved. But the Pax Romana was real, not merely the boast of emperors, and some of the regions in the Empire have never again lived for so many generations free from major wars. So what exactly was the Pax Romana and what did it mean for the people who found themselves brought under Roman rule? Acclaimed historian Adrian Goldsworthy tells the story of the creation of the Empire, revealing how and why the Romans came to control so much of the world and asking whether the favourable image of the Roman peace is a true one. He chronicles the many rebellions by the conquered, and describes why these broke out and why most failed. At the same time, he explains that hostility was only one reaction to the arrival of Rome, and from the start there was alliance, collaboration and even enthusiasm for joining the invaders, all of which increased as resistance movements faded away. A ground-breaking and comprehensive history of the Roman Peace, Pax Romana takes the reader on a journey from the bloody conquests of an aggressive Republic through the age of Caesar and Augustus to the golden age of peace and prosperity under diligent emperors like Marcus Aurelius, offering a balanced and nuanced reappraisal of life in the Roman Empire.

The Colonial ShadowThe Colonial Shadow



In his book Pax Romana: War, Peace and Conquest in the Roman World, Goldsworthy (2016) wrote that the peace in the Roman Empire was one of domination, where a people were defeated and then forced to “love” Rome and accept the “peace” of ...

Author: Kira Celeste

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000840865

Category:

Page: 146

View: 136

The Colonial Shadow examines the colonial psychology that has shaped what is now known as Canada. This psychology has perpetrated devastating harm over the last half a millennium and continues to oppress Indigenous people and degrade the environment. This book is inspired by the tenet of depth psychology that stories and myths from one’s own ancestry can bring about transformation and deep changes in perspective. As such, it investigates how an alchemical way of imagining into white settler colonial consciousness might contribute to its accountability and psychological healing today. The Colonial Shadow will be an invaluable resource for professionals, academics and students of Jungian and post-Jungian ideas, settler-colonial and First Nations studies, sociology, anthropology, and cultural studies as well as for anyone interested in addressing the colonial complex.

Winning WarsWinning Wars



9 An abbreviation that stands for Senatus populusque romanus: 'in the name of the Senate and the People of Rome'. ... 11 Adrian Goldsworthy, The Pax Romana: War, Peace and Conquest in the Roman World (London: W&N, 2017), 309.

Author: Matthias Strohn

Publisher: Casemate Academic

ISBN: 9781952715013

Category:

Page: 333

View: 873

A collection of military history essays examining the philosophical side of war and the meaning of “victory.” What does it mean to win a war? How does this differ from a simple military victory? How have different cultures and societies answered these questions through history, and how can we apply these lessons? When considering how a war might be “won,” there are three big ideas that underpin how success can be measured: ownership, intervention for effect, and fighting for ideas. These three main themes also contain a series of sub-themes: internal and external, short-term and long-term, military success versus political success, and tactical outcomes versus campaign effects versus strategic success. This book examines the constituent parts of what may comprise “victory” or “winning” in war and then travels, chronologically, through a wide variety of historical case studies, further exploring these philosophical components and weaving them into a factual discussion. The authors of each chapter will explore the three big ideas within the context of their individual case studies, offering pointers as to where, within that framework, their case study may sit. The message of this book is not just an academic exploration for its own sake, but a vital aspect (both morally and practically) of the political and military business of the application of force. In short, know in advance how you wish to end before you start. “Comprising sixteen excellent and thought-provoking essays by eighteen noted military historians and former warriors, the book comprehensively examines the realities of war and the wide-ranging concepts of victory. At the same time, it offers a very good general history of warfare.” —Baird Maritime “[This book] can provide useful insights to anyone; students and subject matter experts alike can find something to gain from this book. Most importantly, its emphasis on contemporary warfare can provide consequential information for our current military and civilian leadership, if they are willing to hear it.” —Air & Space Power Journal

LydiaLydia



The Pax Romana was more propaganda than reality, but sought to establish the principle that the Romans had brought peace ... see A. K. Goldsworthy, Pax Romana: War, Peace and Conquest in the Roman World (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2016).

Author: Paula Gooder

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781444792072

Category:

Page: 332

View: 406

The New Testament tells us very little about Lydia, a seller of purple cloth who was living in Philippi when she met the apostle Paul on his second missionary journey. And yet she is considered the first recorded convert to Christianity in Europe. In her second work of fiction, Biblical scholar and popular author and speaker Paula Gooder tells Lydia's story - who she was, the life she lived and her first-century faith - and in doing so opens up Paul's letter to the Philippians, giving a sense of the cultural and historical pressures that shaped Paul's thinking, and the faith of the early church. Written in the gripping style of Gerd Theissen's The Shadow of the Galilean, and similarly rigorously researched, this is a book for everyone and anyone who wants to engage more deeply and imaginatively with Paul's theology - from one of the UK's foremost New Testament scholars.

The Roman World from Romulus to MuhammadThe Roman World from Romulus to Muhammad



Rome's Greatest General. Washington, DC, 2008 Galinsky K (ed.) The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Augustus. Cambridge, 2007, doi:10.1017/CCOL0521807964 Goldsworthy A. Pax Romana. War, Peace, and Conquest in the Roman World.

Author: Greg Fisher

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000432695

Category:

Page: 801

View: 571

This volume provides a detailed examination of nearly 1,400 years of Roman history, from the foundation of the city in the eighth century BC until the evacuation of Roman troops from Alexandria in AD 642 in the face of the Arab conquests. Drawing on a vast array of ancient texts written in Latin, Greek, Syriac, Armenian, and Arabic, and relying on a host of inscriptions, archaeological data, and the evidence from ancient art, architecture, and coinage, The Roman World from Romulus to Muhammad brings to the fore the men and women who chronicled the story of the city and its empire. Richly illustrated with 71 maps and 228 illustrations—including 20 in colour—and featuring a detailed glossary and suggestions for further reading, this volume examines a broad range of topics, including ancient climate change, literature, historiography, slavery, war and conquest, the development of Christianity, the Jewish revolts, and the role of powerful imperial women. The author also considers the development of Islam within a Roman historical context, examines the events that led to the formation of the post-Roman states in Western Europe, and contemplates aff airs on the imperial periphery in the Caucasus, Ethiopia, and the Arabian Peninsula. Emphasising the voices of antiquity throughout, The Roman World from Romulus to Muhammad is an invaluable resource for students and scholars interested in the beguiling history of the world’s most famous empire.

The Death of ChristThe Death of Christ



7.4: Mosaic with fishing scene; ca. early third century from a Roman house, Sousse (Tunisia). ... (Reprinted from Pax Romana. War, Peace, and Conquest in the Roman World, by Adrian Goldsworthy, with permission of Yale University Press.) ...

Author: Steven Rutlidge

Publisher: Pen and Sword History

ISBN: 9781399088800

Category:

Page: 274

View: 485

What was the world like, and what was going on in it, around the time of Jesus’ death? This study examines this very question, and also seeks to place Jesus in his larger historical context, as a non-citizen resident of the Roman Empire living in Judaea and Galilee in the 20s and 30s AD. The book explores the larger background and context to some of the major power-brokers of the Roman Empire in Jesus’ day, including the emperor Tiberius, his ambitious Praetorian Prefect Sejanus, Judaea’s governor Pontius Pilate, and the client king who governed Galilee, Herod Antipas. It further explores some of the larger historical and cultural context and background of some of the characters who parade through the gospel accounts, including the treacherous informant Judas Iscariot, the tax collector turned apostle, Matthew, and the gruff centurion whose servant Jesus was said to have healed. The study also considers the nature of Jesus’ radical resistance to the Roman Empire, and seeks to contextualize it through comparison with other resistance movements. Attempts to recover the historical Jesus have sought to put him in his immediate context of ancient Galilee, Judaea, and the Jewish community to which he belonged. Instead this book gives the Roman historical background to the time and place of his ministry and death. Cast into relief against the much larger picture of the greater Roman world of which he was a part, the ministry of Jesus is quite radical indeed.

Conquering PeaceConquering Peace



in Veyne, L'Empire grécoromain (Paris: Seuil, 2005), 15–78; Valérie Huet, “Napoleon I: A New Augustus?,” in Roman ... See Adrian Goldsworthy, Pax Romana: War, Peace and Conquest in the Roman World (London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2016), ...

Author: Stella Ghervas

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674259089

Category:

Page: 432

View: 147

A bold new look at war and diplomacy in Europe that traces the idea of a unified continent in attempts since the eighteenth century to engineer lasting peace. Political peace in Europe has historically been elusive and ephemeral. Stella Ghervas shows that since the eighteenth century, European thinkers and leaders in pursuit of lasting peace fostered the idea of European unification. Bridging intellectual and political history, Ghervas draws on the work of philosophers from Abbé de Saint-Pierre, who wrote an early eighteenth-century plan for perpetual peace, to Rousseau and Kant, as well as statesmen such as Tsar Alexander I, Woodrow Wilson, Winston Churchill, Robert Schuman, and Mikhail Gorbachev. She locates five major conflicts since 1700 that spurred such visionaries to promote systems of peace in Europe: the War of the Spanish Succession, the Napoleonic Wars, World War I, World War II, and the Cold War. Each moment generated a “spirit” of peace among monarchs, diplomats, democratic leaders, and ordinary citizens. The engineers of peace progressively constructed mechanisms and institutions designed to prevent future wars. Arguing for continuities from the ideals of the Enlightenment, through the nineteenth-century Concert of Nations, to the institutions of the European Union and beyond, Conquering Peace illustrates how peace as a value shaped the idea of a unified Europe long before the EU came into being. Today the EU is widely criticized as an obstacle to sovereignty and for its democratic deficit. Seen in the long-range perspective of the history of peacemaking, however, this European society of states emerges as something else entirely: a step in the quest for a less violent world.

History and Politics of Well Being in EuropeHistory and Politics of Well Being in Europe



given to a time of peace and prosperity which is called the “Pax Romana” or “Roman Peace” which endured about 200 ... that “peace, prosperity, security and satisfaction” were existing for the 70 million inhabitants of the Roman Empire.

Author: Wolfgang Glatzer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030050481

Category:

Page: 84

View: 456

This book presents a reconstruction of the history of well-being on the European continent with special attention to the European Union, as people from Europe have a history of a long-term march towards well-being. It discusses ancient civilizations on the European continent, which have contributed significantly to the features of well-being in contemporary Europe. Following Europe`s success over the past millennium, which brought the continent a unique rise to better well-being it also imposed new challenges for sustaining well-being and alleviating misery. It is shown that Europeans attained a high level of well-being in global comparison, yet their attitudes remained at the same time ambivalent and precarious. Significant parts of the population claim a low well-being and suffer from the difficulties of life. Even though a top ranked area of socio-economic development in the world, this book shows that poverty, inequality and hardship remain stable structural problems which have to be overcome in order to avoid significant restrictions for a broad quality of life. But despite all their burdens and hardships, Europeans are among the most prosperous and privileged people in the world.