Nuns Literacies in Medieval EuropeNuns Literacies in Medieval Europe



Contributors to this volume investigate the topic of literacy primarily from palaeographical and textual evidence and by discussing information about book ownership and production in convents.

Author: Virginia Blanton

Publisher: Medieval Women: Texts and Cont

ISBN: 2503554113

Category:

Page: 562

View: 577

The present volume is the third in a series of three integrated publications, the first produced in 2013 as Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Hull Dialogue and the second in 2015 as Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Kansas City Dialogue. Whereas the first volume focused primarily on Northern Europe, the second expanded the range to include material in minority languages such as Old Norse and Old Irish and focused particularly on education and other textual forms, such as the epistolary and the legal. The third volume expands the range still further by including a larger selection of female religious, for instance, tertiaries, and further languages (for example, Danish and Hungarian), as well as engaging more explicitly on issues of adaptation of manuscript and early printed texts for a female readership. Like the previous volumes, this collection of essays, focused on various aspects of nuns' literacies from the late seventh to the mid-sixteenth century, brings together the work of specialists to create a dialogue about the Latin and vernacular texts that were read, written, and exchanged by medieval nuns. Contributors to this volume investigate the topic of literacy primarily from palaeographical and textual evidence and by discussing information about book ownership and production in convents.

Nuns Literacies in Medieval EuropeNuns Literacies in Medieval Europe



The present volume is the second in a series of three integrated publications, the first produced in 2013 as Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Hull Dialogue.

Author: Virginia Blanton

Publisher: Brepols Pub

ISBN: 2503549225

Category:

Page: 330

View: 546

The present volume is the second in a series of three integrated publications, the first produced in 2013 as Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Hull Dialogue. Like that volume, this collection of essays, focused on various aspects of nuns' literacies from the late seventh to the mid-sixteenth century, brings together the work of specialists to create a dialogue about the Latin and vernacular texts that were read, written, and exchanged by medieval nuns. It investigates literacy from palaeographical and textual perspectives, evidence of book ownership and exchange, and other more external evidence, both literary and historical. To highlight the benefits of cross-cultural comparison, contributions include case studies focused on northern and southern Europe, as well as the extreme north and west of the region. A number of essays illustrate nuns' active engagement with formal education, and with varied textual forms, such as the legal and epistolary, while others convey the different opportunities for studying examples of nuns' artistic literacy. The various discussions included here build collectively on the first volume to demonstrate the comparative experiences of medieval female religious who were reading, writing, teaching, composing, and illustrating at different times and in diverse geographical areas throughout medieval Europe.

Nuns Literacies in Medieval EuropeNuns Literacies in Medieval Europe



"This collection of essays...brings together specialists working on diverse geographical areas to create a dialogue about the Latin and vernacular texts nuns read, wrote, and exchanged, primarily in northern Europe form the eighth to the ...

Author: Virginia Blanton

Publisher: Brepols Pub

ISBN: 2503539726

Category:

Page: 367

View: 369

"This collection of essays...brings together specialists working on diverse geographical areas to create a dialogue about the Latin and vernacular texts nuns read, wrote, and exchanged, primarily in northern Europe form the eighth to the mid-sixteenth centuries....Drawing especially on the rich body of scholarship that currently exists about nuns and books in England, Germany, the Low Countries, and Sweden, these essays investigate the meaning of nuns' literacies in terms of reading and writing, Latin and the vernaculars."--Back cover.

Nuns Literacies in Medieval EuropeNuns Literacies in Medieval Europe



"This collection of essays...brings together specialists working on diverse geographical areas to create a dialogue about the Latin and vernacular texts nuns read, wrote, and exchanged, primarily in northern Europe form the eighth to the ...

Author: Virginia Blanton

Publisher:

ISBN: 2503540554

Category:

Page: 367

View: 614

"This collection of essays...brings together specialists working on diverse geographical areas to create a dialogue about the Latin and vernacular texts nuns read, wrote, and exchanged, primarily in northern Europe form the eighth to the mid-sixteenth centuries....Drawing especially on the rich body of scholarship that currently exists about nuns and books in England, Germany, the Low Countries, and Sweden, these essays investigate the meaning of nuns' literacies in terms of reading and writing, Latin and the vernaculars."--Back cover.

The Care of NunsThe Care of Nuns



See also the subsequent volumes Blanton, O'Mara, and Stroop edited, Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Kansas City Dialogue (Turnhout: Brepols, ...

Author: Katie Ann-Marie Bugyis

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190851293

Category:

Page: 368

View: 423

In her ground-breaking new study, Katie Bugyis offers a new history of communities of Benedictine nuns in England from 900 to 1225. By applying innovative paleographical, codicological, and textual analyses to their surviving liturgical books, Bugyis recovers a treasure trove of unexamined evidence for understanding these women's lives and the liturgical and pastoral ministries they performed. She examines the duties and responsibilities of their chief monastic officers--abbesses, prioresses, cantors, and sacristans--highlighting three of the ministries vital to their practice-liturgically reading the gospel, hearing confessions, and offering intercessory prayers for others. Where previous scholarship has argued that the various reforms of the central Middle Ages effectively relegated nuns to complete dependency on the sacramental ministrations of priests, Bugyis shows that, in fact, these women continued to exercise primary control over their spiritual care. Essential to this argument is the discovery that the production of the liturgical books used in these communities was carried out by female scribes, copyists, correctors, and creators of texts, attesting to the agency and creativity that nuns exercised in the care they extended to themselves and those who sought their hospitality, counsel, instruction, healing, forgiveness, and intercession.

The White NunsThe White Nuns



In Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe, edited by Katherine Allen Smith and ... Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Hull Dialogue.

Author: Constance Hoffman Berman

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812295085

Category:

Page: 368

View: 162

Modern studies of the religious reform movement of the central Middle Ages have often relied on contemporary accounts penned by Cistercian monks, who routinely exaggerated the importance of their own institutions while paying scant attention to the remarkable expansion of abbeys of Cistercian women. Yet by the end of the thirteenth century, Constance Hoffman Berman contends, there were more houses of Cistercian nuns across Europe than of monks. In The White Nuns, she charts the stages in the nuns' gradual acceptance by the abbots of the Cistercian Order's General Chapter and describes the expansion of the nuns' communities and their adaptation to a variety of economic circumstances in France and throughout Europe. While some sought contemplative lives of prayer, the ambition of many of these religious women was to serve the poor, the sick, and the elderly. Focusing in particular on Cistercian nuns' abbeys founded between 1190 and 1250 in the northern French archdiocese of Sens, Berman reveals the frequency with which communities of Cistercian nuns were founded by rich and powerful women, including Queen Blanche of Castile, heiresses Countess Matilda of Courtenay and Countess Isabelle of Chartres, and esteemed ladies such as Agnes of Cressonessart. She shows how these founders and early patrons assisted early abbesses, nuns, and lay sisters by using written documents to secure rights and create endowments, and it is on the records of their considerable economic achievements that she centers her analysis. The White Nuns considers Cistercian women and the women who were their patrons in a clear-eyed reading of narrative texts in their contexts. It challenges conventional scholarship that accepts the words of medieval monastic writers as literal truth, as if they were written without rhetorical skill, bias, or self-interest. In its identification of long-accepted misogynies, its search for their origins, and its struggle to reject such misreadings, The White Nuns provides a robust model for historians writing against received traditions.

Superior WomenSuperior Women



Medieval Female Authority in Poitiers' Abbey of Sainte-Croix Jennifer C. Edwards ... and P Stoop, eds., Nuns'Literacies in Medieval Europe The Kansas City ...

Author: Jennifer C. Edwards

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192574985

Category:

Page: 240

View: 504

Superior Women examines the claims of abbesses of the abbey of Sainte-Croix in medieval Poitiers to authority from the abbey's foundation to its 1520 reform. These women claimed to hold authority over their own community, over dependent chapters of male canons, and over extensive properties in Poitou; male officials such as the king of France and the pope repeatedly supported these claims. To secure this support, the abbesses relied on two strategies that the abbey's founder, the sixth-century Saint Radegund, established: they documented support from a network of allies made up of powerful secular and ecclesiastical officials, and they used artefacts left from Radegund's life to shape her cult and win new patrons and allies. Abbesses across the 900 years of this study routinely turned to these strategies successfully when faced with conflict from dependents, or more local officials such as the bishop of Poitiers. Sainte-Croix's nuns proved adept at tailoring these strategies to shifting historical contexts, turning from Frankish bishops to the kings of Frankia, then to the Pope and finally to the King of France as former allies became unavailable to them. The book demonstrates respectful cooperation between men and monastic women, and more extensive respect for female monastic authority than scholars typically recognize. Chapters focus on the cult's manuscripts, church decoration, procession, jurisdictions between cult institutions, reform, and rebellion.

From the Material to the Mystical in Late Medieval PietyFrom the Material to the Mystical in Late Medieval Piety



Monica Hedlund, 'Nuns and Latin, with Special Reference to the Brigittines of Vadstena.' Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Hull Dialogue.

Author: Racha Kirakosian

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108899161

Category:

Page:

View: 801

The German mystic Gertrude the Great of Helfta (c.1256–1301) is a globally venerated saint who is still central to the Sacred Heart Devotion. Her visions were first recorded in Latin, and they inspired generations of readers in processes of creative rewriting. The vernacular copies of these redactions challenge the long-standing idea that translations do not bear the same literary or historical weight as the originals upon which they are based. In this study, Racha Kirakosian argues that manuscript transmission reveals how redactors serve as cultural agents. Examining the late medieval vernacular copies of Gertrude's visions, she demonstrates how redactors recast textual materials, reflected changes in piety, and generated new forms of devotional practices. She also shows how these texts served as a bridge between material culture, in the form of textiles and book illumination, and mysticism. Kirakosian's multi-faceted study is an important contribution to current debates on medieval manuscript culture, authorship, and translation as objects of study in their own right.

Imagining the Woman Reader in the Age of DanteImagining the Woman Reader in the Age of Dante



Joan Ferrante, 'The Education of Women in the Middle Ages in Theory, Fact, ... Veronica O'Mara, and Patricia Stoop, Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The ...

Author: Elena Lombardi

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198818960

Category:

Page: 304

View: 401

Imagining the Woman Reader in the Age of Dante brings to light a new character in medieval literature: that of the woman reader and interlocutor. It does so by establishing a dialogue between literary studies, gender studies, the history of literacy, and the material culture of the book in medieval times. From Guittone d'Arezzo's piercing critic, the 'villainous woman', to the mysterious Lady who bids Guido Cavalcanti to write his grand philosophical song, to Dante's female co-editors in the Vita Nova and his great characters of female readers, such as Francesca and Beatrice in the Comedy, all the way to Boccaccio's overtly female audience, this particular interlocutor appears to be central to the construct of textuality and the construction of literary authority. This volume explores the figure of the woman reader by contextualizing her within the history of female literacy, the material culture of the book, and the ways in which writers and poets of earlier traditions imagined her. It argues that these figures are not mere veneers between a male author and a 'real' male readership, but that, although fictional, they bring several advantages to their vernacular authors, such as orality, the mother tongue, the recollection of the delights of early education, literality, freedom in interpretation, absence of teleology, the beauties of ornamentation and amplification, a reduced preoccupation with the fixity of the text, the pleasure of making mistakes, dialogue with the other, the extension of desire, original simplicity, and new and more flexible forms of authority.

Reading Women in Late Medieval EuropeReading Women in Late Medieval Europe



“Between Court and Cloister: Royal Patronage and Nuns' Literacy in Medieval East-Central Europe.” In Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: the Hull Dialogue.

Author: Alfred Thomas

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137542601

Category:

Page: 251

View: 823

Although Chaucer is typically labeled as the "Father of English Literature," evidence shows that his work appealed to Europe and specifically European women. Rereading the Canterbury Tales , Thomas argues that Chaucer imagined Anne of Bohemia, wife of famed Richard II, as an ideal reader, an aspect that came to greatly affect his writing.

Golden Leaves and Burned BooksGolden Leaves and Burned Books



Religious Reform and Conflict in the Long European Reformation Teemu Immonen, Gabriele Müller- ... Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Hull Dialogue.

Author: Teemu Immonen

Publisher: BoD - Books on Demand

ISBN: 9789526877648

Category:

Page: 342

View: 783

In religious reforms, books and other forms of written communication play a dominant role, both for individuals as well as for groups. Covering the period from the late Middle Ages to the early seventeenth century, the chapters of this volume reflect on the use of books in religious reform movements and their impact on lay people and monastic communities. For those committed to religious renewal, books are the necessary and often enthusiastically welcomed vehicles for the transmission of religious reform concepts. They are at the same time often the objects of severe opposition and negative reactions in attempts at hindering or reversing religious reform for others. The researchers make use of approaches from cultural history, book history and English studies, among others. Contributions range from theory and practices of religious reform with special regard to the interaction between the laity and religious orders in their search for models of 'good religious living' to research on the changing processes of communication from manuscript to print and their impact on religious renewal.

The Encyclopedia of Medieval Literature in BritainThe Encyclopedia of Medieval Literature in Britain



xxxvi CONTRIBUTORS Alastair Bennett is Lecturer in Medieval Literature in the Department ... Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Hull Dialogue (2013), ...

Author: Sian Echard

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118396988

Category:

Page: 2168

View: 558

Bringing together scholarship on multilingual and intercultural medieval Britain like never before, The Encyclopedia of Medieval Literature in Britain comprises over 600 authoritative entries spanning key figures, contexts and influences in the literatures of Britain from the fifth to the sixteenth centuries. A uniquely multilingual and intercultural approach reflecting the latest scholarship, covering the entire medieval period and the full tapestry of literary languages comprises over 600 authoritative yet accessible entries on key figures, texts, critical debates, methodologies, cultural and isitroical contexts, and related terminology Represents all the literatures of the British Isles including Old and Middle English, Early Scots, Anglo-Norman, the Norse, Latin and French of Britain, and the Celtic Literatures of Wales, Ireland, Scotland and Cornwall Boasts an impressive chronological scope, covering the period from the Saxon invasions to the fifth century to the transition to the Early Modern Period in the sixteenth Covers the material remains of Medieval British literature, including manuscripts and early prints, literary sites and contexts of production, performance and reception as well as highlighting narrative transformations and intertextual links during the period

A Companion to Medieval Rules and CustomariesA Companion to Medieval Rules and Customaries



Elisabeth Leedham-Green and Teresa Webber (Cambridge: 2006), 126–151; Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Hull Dialogue, ed. Virginia Blanton et al.

Author: Krijn Pansters

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004431546

Category:

Page: 452

View: 671

An introduction to the Rules and Customaries of the main religious Orders in Medieval Europe: Benedictine, Cistercian, Carthusian, Augustinian, Premonstratensian, Templar, Hospitaller, Teutonic, Dominican, Franciscan, and Carmelite.

The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin WestThe Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West



Ingela Hedström, “Vadstena Abbey and Female Literacy in Late Medieval Sweden,” in Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Hull Dialogue, ed.

Author: Alison I. Beach

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108770637

Category:

Page:

View: 503

Monasticism, in all of its variations, was a feature of almost every landscape in the medieval West. So ubiquitous were religious women and men throughout the Middle Ages that all medievalists encounter monasticism in their intellectual worlds. While there is enormous interest in medieval monasticism among Anglophone scholars, language is often a barrier to accessing some of the most important and groundbreaking research emerging from Europe. The Cambridge History of Medieval Monasticism in the Latin West offers a comprehensive treatment of medieval monasticism, from Late Antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. The essays, specially commissioned for this volume and written by an international team of scholars, with contributors from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States, cover a range of topics and themes and represent the most up-to-date discoveries on this topic.

Studying Gender in Medieval EuropeStudying Gender in Medieval Europe



Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Hull Dialogue, ed. V. Blanton, V. O'Mara and P. Stoop (Turnhout: Brepols, 2013). E. H. Pagel, 'What became of God ...

Author: Patricia Skinner

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 9781137387554

Category:

Page: 192

View: 770

How can we incorporate gender into the study of medieval Europe and why should we do so? Skinner explores how historians have chosen to approach the period, and uses illustrative case studies to help students identify how their own approaches are a product of their social and political environment as well as their own personal preferences.

Fictive Orders and Feminine Religious Identities 1200 1600Fictive Orders and Feminine Religious Identities 1200 1600



Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Hull Dialogue (Turnhout: Brepols, 2013). Blanton, Virginia, Veronica O'Mara, and Patricia Stoop, eds.

Author: Alison More

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198807698

Category:

Page: 224

View: 723

Any visitor to Belgium or the Netherlands is immediately struck by the number of convents and beguinages (begijnhoven) in both major cities and small towns. Their number and location in urban centres suggests that the women who inhabited them once held a prominent role. Despite leaving a visible mark on cities in Europe, much of the story of these women - known variously as beguines, tertiaries, klopjes, recluses, and anchoresses--remains to be told. Instead of aspiring to live as traditional religious, they transcended normative assumptions about religion and gender and had a very real impact on their religious and secular worlds. The sources for their tale are often fragmentary and difficult to interpret. However, careful scrutiny allows their voices to be heard. Drawing on an array of sources including religious rules, sermons, hagiographic vitae, and rapiaria, Fictive Orders and Feminine Religious Identities traces the story of pious laywomen between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries. It both emphasizes the innovative roles of women who transcended established forms of institutional religious life and reveals the ways in which historiographical habits have obscured the dynamic and fluid nature of their histories. By highlighting the development of irregular and extraregular communities and tracing the threads of monasticisation that wove their way around pious laywomen, this book draws attention to the vibrant and dynamic culture of feminine lay piety that persisted from the later middle ages onwards.

Gender and Exemplarity in Medieval and Early Modern SpainGender and Exemplarity in Medieval and Early Modern Spain



Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Kansas City Dialogue (Turnhout: Brepols). Blanton, Virginia, Veronica O'Mara, and Patricia Stoop (eds), 2018.

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004438446

Category:

Page: 312

View: 447

Gender and Exemplarity in Medieval and Early Modern Spain gathers a series of studies on the interplay between gender, sanctity and exemplarity in regard to literary production in the Iberian Peninsula.

Nuns Priests TalesNuns Priests Tales



Men and Salvation in Medieval Women's Monastic Life Fiona J. Griffiths ... and Patricia Stoop, eds., Nuns' Literacies in Medieval Europe: The Hull Dialogue.

Author: Fiona J. Griffiths

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812294620

Category:

Page: 360

View: 924

Nuns' Priests Tales explores the spiritual ideas that motivated priestly service to nuns across Europe and throughout the medieval period, revealing the central role that women played in male spiritual life, and thus moving beyond the reductionist assumption that celibacy defined male spirituality in the age of reform.