Mirror Reflecting DarklyMirror Reflecting Darkly



Accompanying the selections from the archive are essays and personal reflections from a range of writers, academics, and artists--including Keegan herself--which expand upon the themes from the material: networks of creative kinship, the ...

Author: Rita Keegan

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9781912685912

Category:

Page: 160

View: 781

Documenting the artistic practice of Rita Keegan: from exhibitions at major venues to everyday life as a working Black female artist. From the Bronx to Soho to Brixton, Mirror Reflecting Darkly is an exploration of the artist Rita Keegan's archive collection. Part autobiography and part critical history, it reproduces a cross-section of Keegan's archive, mapping an artistic practice that ranges from her exhibitions at such major museums and galleries as the ICA and the Tate to her curatorship of the Women of Colour Index, a groundbreaking 1987 initiative that documented Black and Asian women artists. It includes records of Keegan's journey through different creative environments of London in the 1980s and 1990s, offering rare ephemera drawn from her involvement in the Black British Art movement, covering her years as a fixture of Soho clubland, and documenting the intimate traces of her everyday life as a working Black female artist. Accompanying the selections from the archive are essays and personal reflections from a range of writers, academics, and artists--including Keegan herself--which expand upon the themes from the material: networks of creative kinship, the story of British Black Arts, self-archiving, and archiving as activism. Contributors Barby Asante, Ego Ahaiwe Sowinski, Mora J. Beauchamp-Byrd, Janice Cheddie, Lauren Craig, Lucy Davies, Althea Greenan, Joy Gregory, Hiroko Hagiwara, Matthew Harle, Rita Keegan, Shaheen Merali, Naomi Pearce

Through A Mirror DarklyThrough A Mirror Darkly



What lies behind a reflection?

Author: Mary Catelli

Publisher:

ISBN: 1942564570

Category:

Page:

View: 782

What lies behind a reflection? Powers have filled the world with both heroes and villains. Helen, despite her own powers, had acquired the name Sanddollar but stayed out of the fights. When the enigmatic chess masters create a mirrored world reflecting her own home and the world about it, it's not so easy to escape. All the more in that the people of that world are a dark reflection of all those she knows.

Incest in contemporary literatureIncest in contemporary literature



... Ginny engages with the struggle to express and comprehend traumatic memory as outlined by Caruth and Rodi-Risberg, her narrative itself becoming part of her 'gleaming obsidian shard'; a dark mirror reflecting darkly, it conflicts ...

Author: Miles Leeson

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9781526122186

Category:

Page: 312

View: 462

This is the first edited collection of essays which focuses on the incest taboo and its literary and cultural presentation from the 1950s to the present day. It considers a number of key authors and artists, rather than a single author from this period. The collection exposes the wide use of incest and sexual trauma, and the frequency this appears within contemporary literature and related arts. Incest in contemporary literature discusses the impact of this change in attitudes on literature and literary adaptations in the latter half of the twentieth century, and early years of the twenty-first century. Although primarily concerned with fiction, the collection includes work on television and film. Authors discussed include Iain Banks, A.S. Byatt, Angela Carter, Simone de Beauvoir, Ted Hughes, Doris Lessing, Ian McEwan Iris Murdoch, Vladimir Nabokov, Andrea Newman and Pier Pasolini and Sylvia Plath.

Chila Kumari Burman Shakti Sexuality and Bindi GirlsChila Kumari Burman Shakti Sexuality and Bindi Girls



Burman's early group shows included Black Women Time Now, organized by Women's Art Library, at Battersea Arts Centre in 1983, Mirror Reflecting Darkly in Brixton Art Gallery (1985) and Hounslow Asian Visual Artists Collective (HAVAC) at ...

Author: Rina Arya

Publisher: KT press

ISBN: 9780953654130

Category:

Page: 170

View: 125

A monograph on the artist, Chila Kumari Burman, which looks at her work in terms of her South Asian identity, her contribution to the black arts movement and Stuart Hall’s definitions of “new ethnicities” in contemporary Britain. Rina Arya examines a wide range of works made by the artist from the mid-1980s but focuses on her Ice-Cream series of works (2006-2008) and her Bindi Girls series.

Contemporary British Artists of African Descent and the Unburdening of a GenerationContemporary British Artists of African Descent and the Unburdening of a Generation



Black women artists formed groups and organizations such as Mirror Reflecting Darkly (later called Black Women in View) in 1984 and Polareyes (for black women photographers) in 1986. Lubaina Himid's work as a curator promoted the art of ...

Author: Monique Kerman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319651996

Category:

Page: 256

View: 220

This book explores the notable roles that contemporary British artists of African descent have played in the multicultural context of postwar Britain. In four key case studies— Magdalene Odundo, Veronica Ryan, Mary Evans, and Maria Amidu—Monique Kerman charts their impact through analysis of works, activities, and exhibitions. The author elucidates each of the artists’ creative response to their unique experience and examines how their work engages with issues of history, identity, diaspora, and the distillation of diverse cultural sources. The study also includes a comparative discussion of art broadly defined as “black British,” in order to question assumptions concerning racial and ethnic identities that the artists often negotiate through their works—particularly the expectation or “burden” of representing minority or marginalized communities. Readers are thus challenged to unburden the artists herein and celebrate their work on its own terms.

50 Feminist Art Manifestos50 Feminist Art Manifestos



... with white artists and Black men artists for several years, but this allBlackwomen's show and the ones that have taken place since then – Blackwoman Time Now, 1985 International Women's Day Show, Mirror Reflecting Darkly, etc.

Author: Katy Deepwell

Publisher: KT press

ISBN: 9780992693459

Category:

Page: 168

View: 257

This anthology contains the original manifestos of 50 women artists/feminist groups/feminist protests. Introductory essay by Katy Deepwell, with notes on each manifesto. A print edition of this book is available from KT press. What is a manifesto? A political programme, a declaration, a definitive statement of belief. Neither institutional mission statement, nor religious dogma; neither a poem, nor a book. As a form of literature, manifestos occupy a specific place in the history of public discourse as a means to communicate radical ideas. Distributed as often ephemeral documents, as leaflets or pamphlets in political campaigns or as announcements of the formation of new parties or new avant-gardes, manifestos above all declare what its authors are for and against, and ask people who read them to join them, to understand, to share these ideas. The feminist art manifestos in this anthology do all of these things as they explore the potential and possibilities of women's cultural production as visual artists. Manifestos by: Yvonne Rainer - Mierle Laderman Ukeles - Agnes Denes - Michele Wallace - Nancy Spero - Monica Sjoo and Anne Berg - Rita Mae Brown - VALIE EXPORT - Carolee Schneemann - Feminist Film and Video Organisations - Klonaris and Thomadaki - Kate Walker - Z.Budapest, U.Rosenbach, S.B.A.Coven - Ewa Partum - Women Artists of Pakistan - Chila Burman - Gisela Breitling - Riot Grrl - EVA and Co. - VNS MATRIX - Xu Hong - Violetta Liagatchev - OLD BOYS NETWORK - Lily Bea Moor - Dora Garcia - SubRosa - ORLAN - Rhani Lee Remedes - Factory of Found Clothes - Feminist Art Action Brigade - Mette Ingvartsen – ARCO - YES! Association/Föreningen JA! - Arahmaiani - Elke Krystufek - Guerrilla Girls - Julie Perini - Elizabeth M Stephens and Annie M. Sprinkle - Lucia Tkacova and Anetta Mona Chisa - Linda Mary Montano - Lenka Clayton - Silvia Ziranek - Alexandra Pirici and Raluca Voinea - Representatives of Prague Art Institutions - n i i c h e g o d e l a t - Gluklya (Natalia Pershina -Jakimanskaya) - Not Surprised - Permanent Assembly of Women Art Workers - Feminist Art and Architecture Collective - MANIFIESTO NO, NEIN, NIET !!!!!

Artistic AmbassadorsArtistic Ambassadors



The dark mirror's transformation from darkly reflective to darkly refractive glass may be a function of the way Konfrontasi mediated Wright's lecture. Though Wright gave his lecture in English, the Studieclub's journal offered an ...

Author: Brian Russell Roberts

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813933689

Category:

Page: 231

View: 851

During the first generation of black participation in U.S. diplomacy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a vibrant community of African American writers and cultural figures worked as U.S. representatives abroad. Through the literary and diplomatic dossiers of figures such as Frederick Douglass, James Weldon Johnson, Archibald and Angelina Grimké, W. E. B. Du Bois, Ida Gibbs Hunt, and Richard Wright, Brian Roberts shows how the intersection of black aesthetic trends and U.S. political culture both Americanized and internationalized the trope of the New Negro. This decades-long relationship began during the days of Reconstruction, and it flourished as U.S. presidents courted and rewarded their black voting constituencies by appointing black men as consuls and ministers to such locales as Liberia, Haiti, Madagascar, and Venezuela. These appointments changed the complexion of U.S. interactions with nations and colonies of color; in turn, state-sponsored black travel gave rise to literary works that imported international representation into New Negro discourse on aesthetics, race, and African American culture. Beyond offering a narrative of the formative dialogue between black transnationalism and U.S. international diplomacy, Artistic Ambassadors also illuminates a broader literary culture that reached both black and white America as well as the black diaspora and the wider world of people of color. In light of the U.S. appointments of its first two black secretaries of state and the election of its first black president, this complex representational legacy has continued relevance to our understanding of current American internationalism.

The Philosophy of HorrorThe Philosophy of Horror



Mirror,. Darkly. Art-Horror. as. a. Medium. for. Moral. Reflection. Philip. Tallon. The tale of the irrational is the sanest way I know of expressing the world in which I live. These tales have served me as instruments of both metaphor ...

Author: Thomas Fahy

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813173702

Category:

Page: 272

View: 726

Sitting on pins and needles, anxiously waiting to see what will happen next, horror audiences crave the fear and exhilaration generated by a terrifying story; their anticipation is palpable. But they also breathe a sigh of relief when the action is over, when they are able to close their books or leave the movie theater. Whether serious, kitschy, frightening, or ridiculous, horror not only arouses the senses but also raises profound questions about fear, safety, justice, and suffering. From literature and urban legends to film and television, horror’s ability to thrill has made it an integral part of modern entertainment. Thomas Fahy and twelve other scholars reveal the underlying themes of the genre in The Philosophy of Horror. Examining the evolving role of horror, the contributing authors investigate works such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818), horror films of the 1930s, Stephen King’s novels, Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of The Shining (1980), and Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960). Also examined are works that have largely been ignored in philosophical circles, including Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood (1965), Patrick Süskind’s Perfume (1985), and James Purdy’s Narrow Rooms (2005). The analysis also extends to contemporary forms of popular horror and “torture-horror” films of the last decade, including Saw (2004), Hostel (2005), The Devil’s Rejects (2005), and The Hills Have Eyes (2006), as well as the ongoing popularity of horror on the small screen. The Philosophy of Horror celebrates the strange, compelling, and disturbing elements of horror, drawing on interpretive approaches such as feminist, postcolonial, Marxist, and psychoanalytic criticism. The book invites readers to consider horror’s various manifestations and transformations since the late 1700s, probing its social, cultural, and political functions in today’s media-hungry society.