Massachusetts Cranberry CultureMassachusetts Cranberry Culture



Authors Robert S. Cox and Jacob Walker trace the evolution of cranberry culture in the Bay State, exploring the delectable history of this quintessential New England industry.

Author: Robert S. Cox

Publisher: History Press

ISBN: 1609495136

Category:

Page: 142

View: 656

New Englanders know that cranberries are not for holidays alone. For centuries, this tart fruit—a staple in the Yankee diet since before it was domesticated—has reigned over the cranberry heartland of Barnstable and Plymouth Counties, Massachusetts. Dozens of recipes that utilize the “humble fruit” have risen up over the years, the most popular being cranberry sauce, which one imaginative New Englander paired with lobster. The popularity of the berry exploded in the 1840s, and despite occasional setbacks such as the great pesticide scare of 1959, demand continues to rise to this day. Authors Robert S. Cox and Jacob Walker trace the evolution of cranberry culture in the Bay State, exploring the delectable history of this quintessential New England industry.

Massachusetts Cranberry CultureMassachusetts Cranberry Culture



New Bedford, MA: Spinner Publications, 1990. Tudor, William. Miscellanies. Boston, 1820. Webb, James. Cape Cod Cranberries. New York: Orange Judd, 1886. White, Joseph J. Cranberry Culture. New York: Orange Judd, 1870.

Author: Robert S. Cox

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9781614236764

Category:

Page: 183

View: 698

This historical look at New England’s favorite fruit “ends up capturing the essence of the time period and place”—from the authors of A History of Chowder (Edible South Shore). New Englanders know that cranberries are not for holidays alone. For centuries, this tart fruit—a staple in the Yankee diet since before it was domesticated—has reigned over the cranberry heartland of Barnstable and Plymouth Counties, Massachusetts. Dozens of recipes that utilize the “humble fruit” have risen up over the years, the most popular being cranberry sauce, which one imaginative New Englander paired with lobster. The popularity of the berry exploded in the 1840s, and despite occasional setbacks such as the great pesticide scare of 1959, demand continues to rise to this day. Authors Robert S. Cox and Jacob Walker trace the evolution of cranberry culture in the Bay State, exploring the delectable history of this quintessential New England industry. Includes photos!

Speculative LandscapesSpeculative Landscapes



For other articles that figure cranberry growing as a financial endeavor, see “Cranberry Bogs,” Massachusetts Ploughman, September 25, 1869, 1; “Cranberry Culture,” Massachusetts Ploughman, October 10, 1874, 1; “Drawbacks of the ...

Author: Ross Barrett

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520343917

Category:

Page: 251

View: 133

Speculative Landscapes offers the first comprehensive account of American artists’ financial involvements in and creative responses to the nineteenth-century real estate economy. Examining the dealings of five painters who participated actively in this economy—Daniel Huntington, John Quidor, Eastman Johnson, Martin Johnson Heade, and Winslow Homer—Ross Barrett argues that the experience of property investment exposed artists to new ways of seeing and representing land, inspiring them to develop innovative figural, landscape, and marine paintings that radically reworked visual conventions. This approach moved beyond just aesthetics, however, and the book traces how artists creatively interrogated the economic, environmental, and cultural dynamics of American real estate capitalism. In doing so, Speculative Landscapes reveals how the provocative experience of land investment spurred painters to produce uniquely insightful critiques of the emerging real estate economy, critiques that uncovered its fiscal perils and social costs and imagined spaces outside the regime of private property.

America s Founding FruitAmerica s Founding Fruit



23 “As truethen”: “1929 Cropand Livestock Review,” March 1930, Massachusetts Department of Agriculture, archived at Middleborough PublicLibrary, MA. 23 “consumption of”: Eastwood, Cranberry and Its Culture, 72. 24 “datefrom1550”: Buszek ...

Author: Susan Playfair

Publisher: University Press of New England

ISBN: 9781611686333

Category:

Page: 183

View: 494

The cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon, is one of only three cultivated fruits native to North America. The story of this perennial vine began as the glaciers retreated about fifteen thousand years ago. Centuries later, it kept Native Americans and Pilgrims alive through the winter months, played a role in a diplomatic gesture to King Charles in 1677, protected sailors on board whaling ships from scurvy, fed General GrantÕs men in 1864, and provided over a million pounds of sustenance per year to our World War II doughboys. Today, it is a powerful tool in the fight against various forms of cancer. This is AmericaÕs superfruit. This book poses the question of how the cranberry, and by inference other fruits, will fare in a warming climate. In her attempt to evaluate the effects of climate change, Susan Playfair interviewed growers from Massachusetts west to Oregon and from New Jersey north to Wisconsin, the cranberryÕs temperature tolerance range. She also spoke with scientists studying the health benefits of cranberries, plant geneticists mapping the cranberry genome, a plant biologist who provided her with the first regression analysis of cranberry flowering times, and a migrant beekeeper trying to figure out why the bees are dying. Taking a broader view than the other books on cranberries, AmericaÕs Founding Fruit presents a brief history of cranberry cultivation and its role in our national history, leads the reader through the entire cultivation process from planting through distribution, and assesses the possible effects of climate change on the cranberry and other plants and animals. Could the American cranberry cease growing in the United States? If so, what would be lost?

Crop Protection Research AdvancesCrop Protection Research Advances



In Massachusetts cranberry production , IPM involves pest monitoring by using sweep nets , pheromone traps , and visual inspection . Cultural , chemical , and biological control strategies are used to develop a broad - based approach to ...

Author: Earl N. Burton

Publisher: Nova Publishers

ISBN: 1604560401

Category:

Page: 344

View: 989

Book & CD. Most crop protection deals with the development and promotion of socially and environmentally acceptable technologies to reduce crop losses from pests. Crop protection also deals with protecting crops from weeds, insects and diseases primarily to increase yield. The use of crop protection products secures yields, reduces crop losses and helps provide a sufficient and sustainable supply of healthy and safe food at affordable prices. Ultimately, crop protection tries to increase global food demand. It also deals with efforts to assure food quality and safety. This book presents the latest research from around the globe.

Agriculture YearbookAgriculture Yearbook



The early culture of the cranberry in the Cape Cod , Mass . , district , is surrounded with many stories of historic interest . For example , it is recorded in 1832 that “ Captain Henry Hall of Barnstable , had then cultivated the ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B3027242

Category:

Page: 1560

View: 394

Report of the Commissioner of Agriculture for the Year Report of the Commissioner of Agriculture for the Year



Only about one hundred acres of land have been brought into . cultivation as cranberry fields in the vicinity of Kingston , Plymouth County , in the last fifteen years , and the entire area so cultivated in Massachusetts is estimated at ...

Author: United States. Department of Agriculture

Publisher:

ISBN: MINN:30000008846531

Category:

Page: 784

View: 915