Anxious Masculinity in Early Modern EnglandAnxious Masculinity in Early Modern England



This poem perhaps best exemplifies one of the most pervasive themes of Anxious Masculinity : masculine desire - directed at either men or women - is a destabilizing if not self - destructive force , one that requires constant vigilance ...

Author: Mark Breitenberg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521485886

Category:

Page: 240

View: 295

Explores the importance of heterosexual masculine identity in Renaissance literature and culture.

Feminine Masculine and RepresentationFeminine Masculine and Representation



118) Masculinity is here blurred with femininity, which in turn becomes the projection of a passive (masculine) desire that masculinity cannot tolerate within itself. At this point we might possibly feel tempted to read the text as a ...

Author: Terry Threadgold

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000257076

Category:

Page: 320

View: 735

Feminine/Masculine and Representation provides a much needed introduction to a number of challenging issues raised in debates within gender studies, critical theory and cultural studies. In analysing cultural processes using a range of different methods, the essays in this collection focus on gender/sexuality, representation and cultural politics across a variety of media.

Female MasculinityFemale Masculinity



By seeing masculine iden- tification as merely a stand - in for a properly female desire for women , Castle eliminates the possibility that masculinity may function indepen- dently of men and through biologically female bodies .

Author: Judith Halberstam

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822322439

Category:

Page: 348

View: 947

Masculinity without men. In Female Masculinity Judith Halberstam takes aim at the protected status of male masculinity and shows that female masculinity has offered a distinct alternative to it for well over two hundred years. Providing the first full-length study on this subject, Halberstam catalogs the diversity of gender expressions among masculine women from nineteenth-century pre-lesbian practices to contemporary drag king performances. Through detailed textual readings as well as empirical research, Halberstam uncovers a hidden history of female masculinities while arguing for a more nuanced understanding of gender categories that would incorporate rather than pathologize them. She rereads Anne Lister's diaries and Radclyffe Hall's The Well of Loneliness as foundational assertions of female masculine identity. She considers the enigma of the stone butch and the politics surrounding butch/femme roles within lesbian communities. She also explores issues of transsexuality among "transgender dykes"--lesbians who pass as men--and female-to-male transsexuals who may find the label of "lesbian" a temporary refuge. Halberstam also tackles such topics as women and boxing, butches in Hollywood and independent cinema, and the phenomenon of male impersonators. Female Masculinity signals a new understanding of masculine behaviors and identities, and a new direction in interdisciplinary queer scholarship. Illustrated with nearly forty photographs, including portraits, film stills, and drag king performance shots, this book provides an extensive record of the wide range of female masculinities. And as Halberstam clearly demonstrates, female masculinity is not some bad imitation of virility, but a lively and dramatic staging of hybrid and minority genders.

Masculinity and Marian Efficacy in Shakespeare s EnglandMasculinity and Marian Efficacy in Shakespeare s England



Mark Breitenberg explains: “[sexual desire] impels the masculine subject toward conquest and possession, but at the same time, it threatens to dissolve the very subjectivity that desires in the first place” (128).

Author: Ruben Espinosa

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317099871

Category:

Page: 206

View: 844

Masculinity and Marian Efficacy in Shakespeare's England offers a new approach to evaluating the psychological 'loss' of the Virgin Mary in post-Reformation England by illustrating how, in the wake of Mary's demotion, re-inscriptions of her roles and meanings only proliferated, seizing hold of national imagination and resulting in new configurations of masculinity. The author surveys the early modern cultural and literary response to Mary's marginalization, and argues that Shakespeare employs both Roman Catholic and post-Reformation views of Marian strength not only to scrutinize cultural perceptions of masculinity, but also to offer his audience new avenues of exploring both religious and gendered subjectivity. By deploying Mary's symbolic valence to infuse certain characters, and dramatic situations with feminine potency, Espinosa analyzes how Shakespeare draws attention to the Virgin Mary as an alternative to an otherwise unilaterally masculine outlook on salvation and gendered identity formation.

Intertextual Masculinity in French Renaissance LiteratureIntertextual Masculinity in French Renaissance Literature



The desirous masculine subject cannot be satisfied with the sexual act. Incited by the appearance of its object, his gaze continuously explores and traverses its surface. Moreover, this visual desire translates into a fetishistic ...

Author: David P. LaGuardia

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317113386

Category:

Page: 262

View: 300

Intertextual Masculinity in French Renaissance Literature is an in-depth analysis of normative masculinity in a specific corpus from pre-modern Europe: narrative literature devoted to the subject of adultery and cuckoldry. The text begins with a set of general questions that serve as a conceptual framework for the literary analyses that follow: why were early modern readers so fascinated by the figure of the cuckold? What was his relation to the real world of sexual behavior and gender relations? What effect did he have on the construction of actual masculinities? To respond to these questions, David LaGuardia develops a theoretical approach that is based both on modern critical theory and on close readings of records and documents from the period. Reading early modern legal texts, penance manuals, criminal registers, and exempla collections in relation to the Cent nouvelles nouvelles, Rabelais's Tiers Livre, and Brantôme's Dames galantes, LaGuardia formulates a definition of masculinity in this historical context as a set of intertextual practices that men used to relay and to reinforce their gender identities. By examining legal and literary artifacts from this particular period and culture, this study highlights the extent to which this supposedly normative masculinity was historically contingent and materially conditioned by generic practices.

Modernity and the Nation in Mexican Representations of MasculinityModernity and the Nation in Mexican Representations of Masculinity



Most discourses on the masculine are articulated in a negative mode. Masculine desire bears a destructive effect. Violent eroticism is found in the nineteenth century fin de siècle art and literature, in the novel of revolution, ...

Author: H. Domínguez-Ruvalcaba

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9780230608894

Category:

Page: 182

View: 440

This book looks at representations of the male body, sexuality and power in the arts in Mexico. It analyses literature, visual art and cinema produced from the 1870s to the present, focusing on the Porfirian regime, the Post-revolutionary era, the decadence of the revolutionary state and the emergence of the neo-liberal order in the 1980s.

Hemingway Trauma and MasculinityHemingway Trauma and Masculinity



... Delia—perhaps sensing, as Donna Haraway insightfully observes, that the feminine enjoys a more natural, unmediated contact with nature then the masculine—and so, is essential for mediating the masculine desire for rebirth in nature.

Author: Stephen Gilbert Brown

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783030192303

Category:

Page: 306

View: 692

Hemingway, Trauma and Masculinity: In the Garden of the Uncanny is at once a model of literary interpretation and a psycho-critical reading of Hemingway’s life and art. This book is a provocative and theoretically sophisticated inquiry into the traumatic origins of the creative impulse and the dynamics of identity formation in Hemingway. Building on a body of wound-theory scholarship, the book seeks to reconcile the tensions between opposing Hemingway camps, while moving beyond these rivalries into a broader analysis of the relationship between trauma, identity formation and art in Hemingway.

Female MasculinityFemale Masculinity



By seeing masculine identification as merely a stand-in for a properly female desire for women, Castle eliminates the possibility that masculinity may function independently of men and through biologically female bodies.

Author: Jack Halberstam

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9781478002703

Category:

Page: 360

View: 961

In this quintessential work of queer theory, Jack Halberstam takes aim at the protected status of male masculinity and shows that female masculinity has offered a distinct alternative to it for well over two centuries. Demonstrating how female masculinity is not some bad imitation of virility, but a lively and dramatic staging of hybrid and minority genders, Halberstam catalogs the diversity of gender expressions among masculine women from nineteenth-century pre-lesbian practices to contemporary drag king performances. Through detailed textual readings as well as empirical research, Halberstam uncovers a hidden history of female masculinities while arguing for a more nuanced understanding of gender categories that would incorporate rather than pathologize them. He rereads Anne Lister's diaries and Radclyffe Hall's The Well of Loneliness as foundational assertions of female masculine identity; considers the enigma of the stone butch and the politics surrounding butch/femme roles within lesbian communities; and explores issues of transsexuality among “transgender dykes”—lesbians who pass as men—and female-to-male transsexuals who may find the label of “lesbian” a temporary refuge. Halberstam also tackles such topics as women and boxing, butches in Hollywood and independent cinema, and the phenomenon of male impersonators. Featuring a new preface by the author, this twentieth anniversary edition of Female Masculinity remains as insightful, timely, and necessary as ever.

The Making and Mirroring of Masculine SubjectivitiesThe Making and Mirroring of Masculine Subjectivities



Guenther discusses Hélène Cixous's contrasting of the “closed circle, or restricted economy, of masculine desire with the open-ended or general economy of feminine desire” (53). The masculine and feminine economies are different ways of ...

Author: Susan Mooney

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030991463

Category:

Page: 356

View: 811

This book shows how diverse, critical modern world narratives in prose fiction and film emphasize masculine subjectivities through affects and ethics. Highlighting diverse affects and mental states in subjective voices and modes, modern narratives reveal men as feeling, intersubjective beings, and not as detached masters of master narratives. Modern novels and films suggest that masculine subjectivities originate paradoxically from a combination of copying and negation, surplus and lack, sameness and alterity: among fathers and sons, siblings and others. In this comparative study of more than 30 diverse world narratives, Mooney deftly uses psychoanalytic thought, narrative theories of first- and third-person narrators, and Levinasian and feminist ethics of care, creativity, honor, and proximity. We gain a nuanced picture of diverse postpaternal postgentlemen emerging out of older character structures of the knight and gentleman.

Writing Masculinity in the Later Middle AgesWriting Masculinity in the Later Middle Ages



The narrator's preoccupation with obtaining access represents an abstracted expression of a masculine desire for heterosexual intimacy. These sanitized spaces and the ideal women who inhabit them, though, are moderate, and articulate ...

Author: Isabel Davis

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521866378

Category:

Page: 157

View: 179

Medieval discourses of masculinity and male sexuality were closely linked to the idea and representation of work as a male responsibility. Isabel Davis identifies a discourse of masculine selfhood which is preoccupied with the ethics of labour and domestic living. She analyses how five major London writers of the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries constructed the male self: William Langland, Thomas Usk, John Gower, Geoffrey Chaucer and Thomas Hoccleve. These literary texts, while they have often been considered for what they say about the feminine role and identity, have rarely been thought of as evidence for masculinity; this study seeks to redress that imbalance. Looking again at the texts themselves, and their cultural contexts, Davis presents a genuinely fresh perspective on ideas about gender, labour and domestic life in medieval Britain.