Latin Poetry in the Ancient Greek NovelsLatin Poetry in the Ancient Greek Novels



"This work establishes and explores connections between Greek imperial literature and Latin poetry.

Author: Daniel Jolowicz

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192894823

Category:

Page: 415

View: 327

Latin Poetry in the Ancient Greek Novels establishes and explores connections between Greek imperial literature and Latin poetry. The work offers the first book-length study of the role of Latin literature in Greek literary culture, and provides fresh perspectives and new approaches to the literature and culture of this period.

Old Age in Greek and Latin LiteratureOld Age in Greek and Latin Literature



This volume explores the significance of old age in Greek and Latin poetry and dramatic literature, not just in relation to other textual and historical concerns, but as a cultural and intellectual reality of central importance to ...

Author: Thomas M. Falkner

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791400301

Category:

Page: 260

View: 850

This volume explores the significance of old age in Greek and Latin poetry and dramatic literature, not just in relation to other textual and historical concerns, but as a cultural and intellectual reality of central importance to understanding the works themselves. The book discusses a wide range of authors, from Homer to Aristophanes, Sophocles, and Euripides; from Horace to Vergil, Ovid, and beyond. Classical scholarship on these texts is enriched by a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives drawn from such fields as anthropology, social history, literary theory, psychology, and gerontology. The contributions examine the many and complex representations of old age in classical literature: their relation to the social and psychological realities of old age, their connection with the author's own place in the human life course, their metaphorical and symbolic capacity as poetic vehicles for social and ethical values.

Lucretius and the Transformation of Greek WisdomLucretius and the Transformation of Greek Wisdom



This book studies the structure and origins of De Rerum Natura (On the nature of things), the great first-century BC poem by Lucretius.

Author: D. N. Sedley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521542146

Category:

Page: 234

View: 680

This book studies the structure and origins of De Rerum Natura (On the nature of things), the great first-century BC poem by Lucretius. By showing how he worked from the literary model set by the Greek poet Empedocles but under the philosophical inspiration of the Greek philosopher Epicurus, the book seeks to characterise Lucretius' unique poetic achivement. It is addressed to those interested both in Latin poetry and in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy.

The Meters of Greek and Latin PoetryThe Meters of Greek and Latin Poetry



A reprint of the University of Oklahoma Press edition of 1980. This reliable text presents a clear and simple outline of Greek and Latin meters in order that the verse of the Greeks and Romans may be read as poetry.

Author: James W. Halporn

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 0872202437

Category:

Page: 150

View: 557

A reprint of the University of Oklahoma Press edition of 1980. This reliable text presents a clear and simple outline of Greek and Latin meters in order that the verse of the Greeks and Romans may be read as poetry.

Sound Sense and RhythmSound Sense and Rhythm



This book concerns the way we read--or rather, imagine we are listening to--ancient Greek and Latin poetry.

Author: Mark W. Edwards

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9781400824830

Category:

Page: 208

View: 908

This book concerns the way we read--or rather, imagine we are listening to--ancient Greek and Latin poetry. Through clear and penetrating analysis Mark Edwards shows how an understanding of the effects of word order and meter is vital for appreciating the meaning of classical poetry, composed for listening audiences. The first of four chapters examines Homer's emphasis of certain words by their positioning; a passage from the Iliad is analyzed, and a poem of Tennyson illustrates English parallels. The second considers Homer's techniques of disguising the break in the narrative when changing a scene's location or characters, to maintain his audience's attention. In the third we learn, partly through an English translation matching the rhythm, how Aeschylus chose and adapted meters to arouse listeners' emotions. The final chapter examines how Latin poets, particularly Propertius, infused their language with ambiguities and multiple meanings. An appendix examines the use of classical meters by twentieth-century American and English poets. Based on the author's Martin Classical Lectures at Oberlin College in 1998, this book will enrich the appreciation of classicists and their students for the immense possibilities of the languages they read, translate, and teach. Since the Greek and Latin quotations are translated into English, it will also be welcomed by non-classicists as an aid to understanding the enormous influence of ancient Greek and Latin poetry on modern Western literature.

A Guide to Latin Elegy and LyricA Guide to Latin Elegy and Lyric



This volume: Includes full translations alongside the Latin throughout the text to illustrate discussions Analyzes recurring themes and tropes found in Latin poetry such as sexuality and gender, politics and patronage, myth and religion, ...

Author: Barbara K. Gold

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781119227083

Category:

Page: 192

View: 586

Provides the necessary context to read elegiac and lyric poetry, designed for novice and experienced Classics and Latin students alike A Guide to Latin Elegy and Lyric explores the language of Latin poetry while helping readers understand the socio-cultural context of the remarkable period of Roman literary history in which the poetry was composed. With an innovative approach to this important area of classical scholarship, the authors treat elegy alongside lyric as they cover topics such as the Hellenistic influences on Augustan poetry, the key figures that shaped the elegiac tradition of Rome, the motifs of militia amoris ("the warfare of love") and servitium amoris (“the slavery of love”) in Latin love elegy, and more. Organized into ten chapters, the book begins with an introduction to the literary, political, and social contexts of the Augustan Age. The next six chapters each focus on an individual lyric and elegiac poet—Catullus, Horace, Tibullus, Propertius, Ovid, and Sulpicia—followed by a survey of several lesser-known poets and post-Augustan elegy and lyric. The text concludes with a discussion of major tropes and themes in Latin elegy and lyric, and an overview and analysis of key critical approaches in current scholarship. This volume: Includes full translations alongside the Latin throughout the text to illustrate discussions Analyzes recurring themes and tropes found in Latin poetry such as sexuality and gender, politics and patronage, myth and religion, wealth and poverty, empire, madness, magic, and witchcraft Reviews modern critical approaches to elegiac and lyric poetry including autobiographical realism, psychoanalysis, narratology, reception, and decolonization Includes helpful introductory sections: "How to Read a Latin Elegiac or Lyric Poem" and "How to Teach a Latin Elegiac and Lyric Poem" Provides information about each poet, an in-depth discussion of some of their poetry, and cultural and historical background Features a dedicated chapter on Sulpicia, offering readers an ancient female viewpoint on sex and gender, politics, and patronage Part of the acclaimed Blackwell Guides to Classical Literature series, A Guide to Latin Elegy and Lyric is the perfect text for both introductory and advanced courses in Latin elegy and lyric, accessible for students reading the poetry in translation, as well as for those experienced in Latin with an interest in learning a different approach to the subject.

Inscriptions and Their Uses in Greek and Latin LiteratureInscriptions and Their Uses in Greek and Latin Literature



This volume offers a wide-ranging set of perspectives on the diversity of epigraphic material present in ancient literary texts, and the variety of responses, both ancient and modern, which they can provoke.

Author: Peter Liddel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199665747

Category:

Page: 403

View: 314

From the archaic period onwards, ancient literary authors working within a range of genres discussed and quoted a variety of inscriptions. This volume offers a wide-ranging set of perspectives on the diversity of epigraphic material present in ancient literary texts, and the variety of responses, both ancient and modern, which they can provoke.

Ancient Greek EpigramsAncient Greek Epigrams



This volume presents a selection of Greek epigrams in verse translation, including many from the recently discovered Milan papyrus.

Author: Gordon L. Fain

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520265790

Category:

Page: 252

View: 721

This volume presents a selection of Greek epigrams in verse translation, including many from the recently discovered Milan papyrus. The poets represented are Anyte, Leonidas of Tarentum, Asclepiades, Posidippus, Callimachus, Theocritus, Meleager, Philodemos and Lucillius.

Politics and Divinization in Augustan PoetryPolitics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry



Through a series of close readings, this book challenges the view that poetic images of Augustus' divinization merely reflect the poets' attitude towards Augustus or their recognition of his power, and puts forward a new understanding of ...

Author: Bobby Xinyue

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192855978

Category:

Page: 252

View: 610

Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry offers a new interpretation of one of the most prominent themes in Latin poetry, the divinization of Augustus, and argues that this theme functioned as a language of political science for the early Augustan poets as they tried to come to terms with Rome's transformation from Republic to Principate. Examining an extensive body of texts ranging from Virgil's Eclogues to Horace's final book of the Odes (covering a period roughly from 43 BC to 13 BC), this study highlights the multifaceted metaphorical force of divinizing language, as well as the cultural complications of divinization. Through a series of close readings, this book challenges the view that poetic images of Augustus' divinization merely reflect the poets' attitude towards Augustus or their recognition of his power, and puts forward a new understanding of this motif as an evolving discourse through which the first generation of Augustan poets articulated, interrogated, and negotiated Rome's shift towards authoritarianism.