Journey to the AntsJourney to the Ants



Richly illustrated and delightfully written, Journey to the Ants combines autobiography and scientific lore to convey the excitement and pleasure the study of ants can offer.

Author: Bert Hölldobler

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674485262

Category:

Page: 240

View: 623

Richly illustrated and delightfully written, Journey to the Ants combines autobiography and scientific lore to convey the excitement and pleasure the study of ants can offer. Bert Hölldobler and E. O. Wilson interweave their personal adventures with the social lives of ants, building, from the first minute observations of childhood, a remarkable account of these abundant insects’ evolutionary achievement.

Journey to the AntsJourney to the Ants



Enemy specification by the ant Pheidole dentata (black), in which the workers respond much more aggressively to fire and thief ants of the genus Solenopsis (gray), than to other kinds of ants. After contacting fire-ant workers near the ...

Author: Bert Hölldobler

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674254589

Category:

Page: 240

View: 559

Richly illustrated and delightfully written, Journey to the Ants combines autobiography and scientific lore to convey the excitement and pleasure the study of ants can offer. Bert Hölldobler and E. O. Wilson interweave their personal adventures with the social lives of ants, building, from the first minute observations of childhood, a remarkable account of these abundant insects’ evolutionary achievement.

The Earth DwellersThe Earth Dwellers



Ed, Renee, and the tropical ants that live in their home and in his office relish the heat. ... Naturalist, and his memoir of myrmecology research with Holldobler, Journey to the Ants, Wilson has been under pressure — hounded by his old ...

Author: Erich Hoyt

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780684830452

Category:

Page: 320

View: 439

Explores the world of ants in a Costa Rican nature reserve in a study that is told from the ant's perspective, and profiles such ants as the leafcutter scout and swarm-raider male

AntAnt



126–44. 7 Edward O. Wilson, Naturalist (Harmondsworth, 1995), p. 194. 8 See the special edition of Ecology edited by Gordon and Pamela A. Matson; Ecology, LXXII (1991). 9 Bert Hölldobler and Edward O. Wilson, Journey to the Ants: A ...

Author: Charlotte Sleigh

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 9781861894816

Category:

Page: 216

View: 988

Ants are legion: at present there are 11,006 species of ant known; they live everywhere in the world except the polar icecaps; and the combined weight of the ant population has been estimated to make up half the mass of all insects alive today. When we encounter them outdoors, ants fascinate us; discovered in our kitchen cupboards, they elicit horror and disgust. Charlotte Sleigh’s Ant elucidates the cultural reasons behind our varied reactions to these extraordinary insects, and considers the variety of responses that humans have expressed at different times and in different places to their intricate, miniature societies. Ants have figured as fantasy miniature armies, as models of good behavior, as infiltrating communists and as creatures on the borderline between the realms of the organic and the machine: in 1977 British Telecom hired ant experts to help solve problems with their massive information network. This is the first book to examine ants in these and many other such guises, and in so doing opens up broader issues about the history of science and humans’ relations with the natural world. It will be of interest to anyone who likes natural history or cultural studies, or who has ever rushed out and bought a can of RaidTM. "[Charlotte Sleigh's] stylish, engaging and informative study deserves to win new members for the ant fan club."—Jonathan Bate, The Times

Secret Lives of AntsSecret Lives of Ants



xxiii was a rare enough occurrence, but queen ants from different species coming together to found a colony was a ... The Ants was too lengthy and technical for the layman, so they published a shorter work, Journey to the Ants, in 1994.

Author: Jae Choe

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9781421405216

Category:

Page: 184

View: 461

In the words of the author, “Once you get to know them, you’ll love them.”

Who s who of Pulitzer Prize WinnersWho s who of Pulitzer Prize Winners



Journey to the Ants : A Story of Scientific Exploration ( with Bert Holldobler ) , 1994. In Search of Nature , 1996 . Other Awards : Award from American Association for the Advancement of Science , 1969.

Author: Elizabeth A. Brennan

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 1573561118

Category:

Page: 666

View: 686

List Pulitzer Prize winners in thirty-nine different categories, arranged chronologically, with biographical and career information, selected works, other awards, and a brief commentary, along with material on Pulitzer.

A World of InsectsA World of Insects



CONTENTS Introduction, 1 Ring T. Cardé and Vincent H. Resh, 1 1 The Fascination of Studying Insects, 3 Bert Hölldobler and Edward O. Wilson, Journey to the Ants For the Love of Ants, 5 2 Insects and the Human Food Supply, ...

Author: Ring T Cardé

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674046191

Category:

Page: 404

View: 815

A World of Insects showcases classic works on insect behavior, physiology, and ecology published over half a century by Harvard University Press authors Costa, Dethier, Eisner, Goff, Heinrich, Hölldobler, Roeder, Ross, Seeley, von Frisch, Waldbauer, Wilson, and Winston.

Last of the SandwalkersLast of the Sandwalkers



The superorganism is an intriguing way to think about social insects like ants. In their book Journey to the Ants, Wilson and Hölldobler once famously wrote that “One ant alone is a disappointment; it is really no ant at all.

Author: Jay Hosler

Publisher: First Second

ISBN: 9781626723917

Category:

Page: 320

View: 267

Nestled in the grass under the big palm tree by the edge of the desert there is an entire civilization--a civilization of beetles. In this bug's paradise, beetles write books, run restaurants, and even do scientific research. But not too much scientific research is allowed by the powerful elders, who guard a terrible secret about the world outside the shadow of the palm tree. Lucy is not one to quietly cooperate, however. This tiny field scientist defies the law of her safe but authoritarian home and leads a team of researchers out into the desert. Their mission is to discover something about the greater world...but what lies in wait for them is going to change everything Lucy thought she knew. Beetles are not the only living creatures in the world. Deftly combining suspenseful adventure storytelling with the principles and tools of scientific inquiry, entomologist and cartoonist Jay Hosler has created in Last of the Sandwalkers a tale that satisfies and fascinates even the most bug-averse among us.

Ride of the Second HorsemanRide of the Second Horseman



M. Talbot , “ Slave Raids of the Ant Polyergus lucidus , " Psyche 74/4 ( 1986 ) : 299– 313 2. W. M. Wheeler , Ants : Their ... B. Hölldobler and E. O. Wilson , Journey to the Ants : A Story of Scientific Exploration ( Cambridge , Mass .

Author: Robert L. O'Connell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198022930

Category:

Page: 320

View: 821

"Accurst be he that first invented war," wrote Christopher Marlowe--a declaration that most of us would take as a literary, not literal, construction. But in this sweeping overview of the rise of civilization, Robert O'Connell finds that war is indeed an invention--an institution that arose due to very specific historical circumstances, an institution that now verges on extinction. In Ride of the Second Horseman, O'Connell probes the distant human past to show how and why war arose. He begins with a definition that distinguishes between war and mere feuding: war involves group rather than individual issues, political or economic goals, and direction by some governmental structure, carried out with the intention of lasting results. With this definition, he finds that ants are the only other creatures that conduct it--battling other colonies for territory and slaves. But ants, unlike humans, are driven by their genes; in humans, changes in our culture and subsistence patterns, not our genetic hardware, brought the rise of organized warfare. O'Connell draws on anthropology and archeology to locate the rise of war sometime after the human transition from nomadic hunting and gathering to agriculture, when society split between farmers and pastoralists. Around 5500 BC, these pastoralists initiated the birth of war with raids on Middle Eastern agricultural settlements. The farmers responded by ringing their villages with walls, setting off a process of further social development, intensified combat, and ultimately the rise of complex urban societies dependent upon warfare to help stabilize what amounted to highly volatile population structures, beset by frequent bouts of famine and epidemic disease. In times of overpopulation, the armies either conquered new lands or self-destructed, leaving fewer mouths to feed. In times of underpopulation, slaves were taken to provide labor. O'Connell explores the histories of the civilizations of ancient Sumeria, Egypt, Assyria, China, and the New World, showing how war came to each and how it adapted to varying circumstances. On the other hand, societies based on trade employed war much more selectively and pragmatically. Thus, Minoan Crete, long protected from marauding pastoralists, developed a wealthy mercantile society marked by unmilitaristic attitudes, equality between men and women, and a relative absence of class distinctions. In Assyria, by contrast, war came to be an end in itself, in a culture dominated by male warriors. Despite the violence in the world today, O'Connell finds reason for hope. The industrial revolution broke the old patterns of subsistence: war no longer serves the demographic purpose it once did. Fascinating and provocative, Ride of the Second Horseman offers a far-reaching tour of human history that suggests the age-old cycle of war may now be near its end.