Ralph Waldo Emerson Selected Journals Vol 2 1841 1877 LOA 202 Ralph Waldo Emerson Selected Journals Vol 2 1841 1877 LOA 202



This volume opens with an Emerson at the height of his powers, soon to write his celebrated essays "Experience" and "Self-Reliance," and in the midst of a vibrant intellectual circle.

Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Publisher: Library of America

ISBN: 9781598530681

Category:

Page: 992

View: 628

When Emerson died in 1882 he was the most famous public intellectual in America. Yet his most remarkable literary creation--his journals--remained unpublished. Begun when he was a precocious Harvard junior of 16 and continued without significant lapse for almost 60 years, Emerson's journals were his life's work. They were the starting point for virtually everything in his celebrated essays, lectures, and poems; a "Savings Bank," in which his occasional insights began to cohere and yield interest; a commonplace book, in which he gathered the choicest anecdotes, ideas, and phrases from his voracious and wide-ranging reading; and a fascinating diary in the ordinary sense of the term. It would be a hundred years after his death before these intimate records would appear in print in their entirety, and they are still, at over three million words, among the least known and least available of Emerson's writings. The journals reveal what Emerson called "the infinitude of the private man"-by turns whimsical, incisive, passionate, curious, and candid-in astonishing new ways. With Selected Journals 1841-1877 and its companion volume Selected Journals 1820-1842, The Library of America presents the most ample and comprehensive nonspecialist edition of Emerson's great work ever published-one that retains the original order in which he composed his thoughts and preserves the dramatic range of his unique style in long, uninterrupted passages, but without the daunting critical apparatus of the 16-volume scholarly edition. Each volume includes a 16-page portfolio of images of Emerson and his contemporaries, a note on the selections, extensive notes, biographical sketches, a chronology, and an index. This volume opens with an Emerson at the height of his powers, soon to write his celebrated essays "Experience" and "Self-Reliance," and in the midst of a vibrant intellectual circle. It follows his anguished reactions to the nation's intensifying political turmoil: his anger at the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, his antislavery activism, and his day- to-day experience of the Civil War (including a wartime trip to Washington, D.C., where he met President Lincoln). LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation’s literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America’s best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.

Ralph Waldo Emerson Selected Journals Vol 1 1820 1842 LOA 201 Ralph Waldo Emerson Selected Journals Vol 1 1820 1842 LOA 201



This volume begins with Emerson's first journal entry, on January 25, 1820, in a homemade booklet he titled The Wide World, and follows him through his early years at Harvard College and the Divinity School, his ordination as a Unitarian ...

Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Publisher: Library of America

ISBN: 9781598530674

Category:

Page: 992

View: 732

When Emerson died in 1882 he was the most famous public intellectual in America. Yet his most remarkable literary creation--his journals--remained unpublished. Begun when he was a precocious Harvard junior of 16 and continued without significant lapse for almost 60 years, Emerson's journals were his life's work. They were the starting point for virtually everything in his celebrated essays, lectures, and poems. It would be a hundred years after his death before these intimate records would appear in print in their entirety, and they are still, at over three million words, among the least known and least available of Emerson's writings. With Selected Journals 1820-1842 and its companion volume Selected Journals 1841-1877, The Library of America presents the most ample and comprehensive nonspecialist edition of Emerson's great work ever published--one that retains the original order in which he composed his thoughts and preserves the dramatic range of his unique style in long, uninterrupted passages, but without the daunting critical apparatus of the 16-volume scholarly edition. Each volume includes a 16-page portfolio of images of Emerson and his contemporaries, a note on the selections, extensive notes, biographical sketches, a chronology, and an index. This volume begins with Emerson's first journal entry, on January 25, 1820, in a homemade booklet he titled The Wide World, and follows him through his early years at Harvard College and the Divinity School, his ordination as a Unitarian minister, his marriage to Ellen Tucker and her untimely death, his fateful decision to leave the ministry, and his travels in England and on the Continent. It offers an irreplaceable perspective on the intellectual currents of the day--the emergence of Transcendentalism; the furor over Emerson's "Divinity School Address"; the founding of The Dial; experiments in communal living at Fruitlands and Brook Farm--and intimate sketches of Emerson's friends and contemporaries, including Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Thomas Carlyle, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and others. LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation’s literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America’s best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.

Journals of Ralph Waldo EmersonJournals of Ralph Waldo Emerson



Designed by Bruce Rogers. 1. 1820-1824 -- 2. 1824-1832 -- 3. 1833-1835 -- 4. 1836-1838 -- 5. 1838-1841 -- 6. 1841-1844 -- 7. 1845-1848 -- 8. 1849-1855 -- 9. 1856-1863 -- 10. 1864-1876.

Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Publisher:

ISBN: HARVARD:32044038422978

Category:

Page:

View: 508

Designed by Bruce Rogers. 1. 1820-1824 -- 2. 1824-1832 -- 3. 1833-1835 -- 4. 1836-1838 -- 5. 1838-1841 -- 6. 1841-1844 -- 7. 1845-1848 -- 8. 1849-1855 -- 9. 1856-1863 -- 10. 1864-1876.

The Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo EmersonThe Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson



Ralph Waldo Emerson Linda Allardt, William Henry Gilman. [ 51 ] [ All nationality soon becomes babyish , " 4 even in Carlyle . The ( re ) question between egotisms can never be settled . England makes Greenwich the first meridian ...

Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674484789

Category:

Page: 624

View: 145

Entries from 1841 to 1843 disclose the poet's struggle to maintain his optimism and acquiescence

Journals of Ralph Waldo Emerson with annotations edited by Edward Waldo Emerson and Waldo Emerson ForbesJournals of Ralph Waldo Emerson with annotations edited by Edward Waldo Emerson and Waldo Emerson Forbes



Ralph Waldo Emerson. shrouding the deception. In this, they all convey ideas determinate, but widely different and all beautiful and intelligent. — But, says Sterne, “the cant of criticism is the most provoking.

Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Publisher: Рипол Классик

ISBN: 9785875749261

Category:

Page:

View: 961

The Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo EmersonThe Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson



Volume VI in this series contains quotation books and miscellaneous notebooks that Ralph Waldo Emerson kept between 1824 and 1838, and to which he added occasionally as late as the 1860s.

Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674484568

Category:

Page: 446

View: 450

Volume VI in this series contains quotation books and miscellaneous notebooks that Ralph Waldo Emerson kept between 1824 and 1838, and to which he added occasionally as late as the 1860s. With some attempt at a systematic listing, but more often at random, he set down an enormous variety of entries from Burke, Montaigne, Madame de Staël, Bacon, Plutarch, Jeremy Taylor, and a host of other writers both famous and obscure, with frequent comments of his own. One book contains Emerson's lengthy translations of Goethe, while another is devoted to his brother Charles, who died in 1836, and includes, among other items, excerpts from Charles's letters to his fiancée. A third contains an interview with a survivor of the battle of Concord and household accounts from the fall and winter of 1835, just after Emerson's marriage to Lydia Jackson. Frequent annotations show that Emerson referred to several of these books in composing the sermons he began to give late in 1826, and that many of the entries found their way into his public lectures, into Nature, and into Essays: First Series. These pages are a fascinating indication of the sources on which Emerson drew steadily in his writing and thinking, and reflect clearly, although indirectly, his own characteristic philosophy.

The Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo EmersonThe Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson



Entries from 1841 to 1843 disclose the poet's struggle to maintain his optimism and acquiescence

Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674484754

Category:

Page: 712

View: 158

Entries from 1841 to 1843 disclose the poet's struggle to maintain his optimism and acquiescence