Liberalism and Social ActionLiberalism and Social Action



In Liberalism and Social Action, John Dewey (1859-1952), one of America's leading social philosophers, surveys the history of liberal thought from John Locke to John Stuart Mill, in his search to find the core of liberalism for today's ...

Author: John Dewey

Publisher: Great Books in Philosophy

ISBN: PSU:000046272027

Category:

Page: 93

View: 224

In Liberalism and Social Action, John Dewey (1859-1952), one of America's leading social philosophers, surveys the history of liberal thought from John Locke to John Stuart Mill, in his search to find the core of liberalism for today's world. While liberals of all stripes have held to some very basic values - liberty, individuality, and the critical use of intelligence - earlier forms of liberalism restricted the state function to protecting its citizens while allowing free rein to socioeconomic forces. But, as society matures, so must liberalism as it reaches out, to redefine itself in a world where government must play a role in creating an environment in which citizens can achieve their potential. Dewey's advocacy of a positive role for government - a new liberalism - nevertheless finds him rejecting radical Marxists and fascists who would use violence and revolution rather than democratic methods to achieve social objectives.

American LiberalismAmerican Liberalism



New York : American Committee for Cultural Freedom , 1952 . - . Heresy , Yes ;
Conspiracy , No ! New York : The John Day Co. , 1953 . “ John Dewey and the
Crisis of American Liberalism , ” The Antioch Review , 29 ( Summer , 1969 ) , 218
-32 ...

Author: William Gerber

Publisher: Lanham, MD : University Press of America

ISBN: UOM:39015013452795

Category:

Page: 335

View: 351

This book analyzes the concept of liberalism, interprets the history of liberalism in the United States, appraises the reasons why liberalism has not brought about the millennium in America, and offers a prognostication as to the future of liberalism. This reprint of the G.K. Hall & Co. edition is co-published by the North American Society for Social Philosophy.

The Politics of John DeweyThe Politics of John Dewey



This book contains the most complete documentary account of Dewey's political thought and activities available. Dewey's enduring insights into democratic politics are still relevant today.

Author: Gary Bullert

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015001778508

Category:

Page: 219

View: 231

John Dewey was one of the foremost social and political philosophers of the twentieth century. He worked to reorient philosophy toward the concrete problems of humankind and tirelessly addressed himself to the public issues of his day, remaining at the center of heated intellectual and public controversy. This book contains the most complete documentary account of Dewey's political thought and activities available. Dewey's enduring insights into democratic politics are still relevant today. Dewey grounded his political ideals historically within the American democratic experience and sought to adapt Jeffersonian idealism to the corporate-industrial age. Like Jefferson, Dewey maintained that the roots of the American political tradition are moral, not merely a means to material gain. Dewey's theory of democracy was designed to reconcile freedom with authority, social stability with the need for reform, and universal standards with specific circumstances. Dewey maintained an unyielding commitment to scientific intelligence and free critical thought. He recognized that at the heart of all policy making is a value judgment. Nevertheless, he held that rational grounds can be found to justify some courses of conduct as more valid than others. By examining Dewey's political activities, The Politics of John Dewey assesses the viability of pragmatic liberalism by its own standard and describes the significant contributions of this influential American philosopher.

John Dewey s LiberalismJohn Dewey s Liberalism



"John Dewey and the Crisis of American Liberalism." Antioch Review 29 (summer 1969): 218-32. -. John Dewey: An Intellectual Perspective. New York: John Day ...

Author: Daniel Savage

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809324105

Category:

Page: 219

View: 607

John Dewey's classical pragmatism, Daniel M. Savage asserts, can be used to provide a self-development-based justification of liberal democracy that shows the current debate between liberal individualism and republican communitarianism to be based largely on a set of pseudoproblems. From Dewey's classical pragmatism, Savage derives a conception of individual autonomy that, while meeting all of the criteria for a conception of autonomy, does not, as the dominant Kantian variant does, require transcendence from any particular language community. The Deweyan conception of autonomy that Savage derived from classical pragmatism, in fact, requires that the individual be situated within a context of cultural beliefs. Savage argues that this particular conception of autonomy is necessary if one wants to conceive of life, as communitarians do, as a quest for the good life within a social context. Thus, Savage constructs a conception of autonomy that consists of a set of intellectual virtues, each of which can be understood, like Aristotle's moral virtues, as a mean between two extremes (or vices). The virtue of critical reflection is the mean between the vices of dogmatism on the one hand and philosophical skepticism on the other. The virtue of creative individuality is the mean between the opposing vices of conformity and eccentricity. Finally, the virtue of sociability is the mean between the extremes of docility and rebelliousness. The three virtues together provide a natural method of adapting to change. The method is natural because it is in accord with a continuous cycle of activity--tension/movement/harmony--that is generic to all living things, Dewey's method of adapting to change requires, in both the individual and in the community, the synthesis of integrating and differentiating forces.

Mass Market Fiction and the Crisis of American Liberalism 1972 2017Mass Market Fiction and the Crisis of American Liberalism 1972 2017



The era's economized liberalism manifests through enchantment as well as ... Philosopher John Dewey asserts that liberalism cyclically releases wealth and ...

Author: Michael J. Blouin

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9783319893877

Category:

Page: 253

View: 516

Mass-Market Fiction and the Crisis of American Liberalism, 1972–2017 tracks the transformation of liberal thought in the contemporary United States through the unique lens of the popular paperback. The book focuses on cultural shifts as they appear in works written by some of the most widely-read authors of the last fifty years: the idea of love within a New Economy (Danielle Steel), the role of government in scientific inquiry (Michael Crichton), entangled political alliances and legacies in the aftermath of the 1960s (Tom Clancy), the restructured corporation (John Grisham), and the blurred line between state and personal empowerment (Dean Koontz). To address the current crisis, this book examines how the changed character of American liberalism has been rendered legible for a mass audience.

Radical Interactionism on the RiseRadical Interactionism on the Rise



John Dewey and the crisis of American liberalism. The Antioch Review, 29, 218–232. Hewitt, J. P., & Shulam, D. (2011). Self and society: A symbolic ...

Author: Lonnie Athens

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 9781781907856

Category:

Page: 300

View: 856

This issue of the Blue Ribbon Papers is must reading for anyone wishing to remain up- to- date on the latest breaking developments in interactionism which could potentially change forever both the history of this venerated American school of thought and, in turn, American sociological theory.

I Am the ChangeI Am the Change



Or will he be derailed by his very successes? These are the questions at the heart of Kesler's thoughtful and illuminating book.

Author: Charles R. Kesler

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 9780062072979

Category:

Page: 304

View: 385

Is Barack Obama the savior of liberalism—or the last liberal president? Charles R. Kesler's spirited analysis of Obama's political thought shows that he represents either a new birth of liberalism—or its demise. Who is Barack Obama? Though many of his own supporters wonder if he really believes in anything, Charles R. Kesler argues that these disappointed liberals don't appreciate the scope of the president's ambition or the long-term stakes for which he is playing. Conservatives also misunderstand Obama, according to this leading conservative scholar, educator, and journalist. They dismiss him as a socialist, hopelessly out of touch with the American mainstream. The fringe Right dwells on Obama's foreign upbringing, his missing birth certificate, Bill Ayers's supposed authorship of his books. What mainstream and fringe have in common is a stubborn underestimation of the man and the political movement he embodies. Reflecting a sophisticated mix of philosophy, psychology, and history, and complemented by a scathing wit, I Am the Change tries to understand Obama as he understands himself, based largely on his own writings, speeches, and interviews. Kesler, the rare conservative who takes Obama seriously as a political thinker, views him as a gifted and highly intelligent progressive who is attempting to become the greatest president in the history of modern liberalism. Intent on reinvigorating the liberal faith, Obama nonetheless fails to understand its fatal contradictions—a shortsightedness that may prove to be liberalism's undoing. Will Obama save liberalism and become its fourth great incarnation, following Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson? Or will he be derailed by his very successes? These are the questions at the heart of Kesler's thoughtful and illuminating book.

Sidney Hook ReconsideredSidney Hook Reconsidered



Matthew J. Cotter. Reply by Robert Conquest , ibid . ... Reason and Violence :
Some Truths and Myths about John Dewey . " Humanist 29 ( Mar . - Apr . 1969 ) ...
John Dewey and the Crisis of American Liberalism . ” Antioch Review 29 (
Summer ...

Author: Matthew J. Cotter

Publisher: Pyr Books

ISBN: UOM:39015059158660

Category:

Page: 392

View: 745

"With a full bibliography of Hook's works and reviews of them, plus an afterword by Richard Rorty, this collection of essays presents a reassessment of one of the United States' most misunderstood public philosophers and will make provocative reading for anyone interested in the intellectual history of the cold war and the complex socio-politics of the twentieth century."--Jacket.

Understanding John DeweyUnderstanding John Dewey



Cf. Sidney Hook , “ John Dewey and the Crisis of American Liberalism , ” 226 ; Hofstadter , Anti - Intellectualism in American Life , 197-229 ; Featherstone ...

Author: James Campbell

Publisher: Open Court Publishing

ISBN: 0812692853

Category:

Page: 310

View: 139

Dewey is the most influential of American social thinkers, and his stock is now rising once more among professional philosophers. Yet there has heretofore been no adequate, readable survey of the full range of Dewey's thought. After an introduction situating Dewey in the context of American social and intellectual history, Professor Campbell devotes Part I to Dewey's general philosophical perspective as it considers humans and their natural home. Three aspects of human nature are most prominent in Dewey's thinking: humans as evolutionary emergents, as essentially social beings, and as problem solvers. Part II examines Dewey's social vision, taking his ethical views as the starting point. Underlying all of Dewey's efforts at social reconstruction are certain assumptions about cooperative enquiry as a social method, assumptions which Campbell explains and clarifies before evaluating various criticisms of Dewey's ideas. The final chapter discusses Dewey's views on religion.

Education and the Cold WarEducation and the Cold War



Beginning with the genealogy of progressive education, and ending with the formation of New Left and New Right thought, Education and the Cold War offers a fresh perspective on the postwar transformation in U.S. political culture by way of ...

Author: Andrew Hartman

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9780230611023

Category:

Page: 251

View: 176

Shortly after the Russians launched Sputnik in 1957, Hannah Arendt quipped that "only in America could a crisis in education actually become a factor in politics." The Cold War battle for the American school - dramatized but not initiated by Sputnik - proved Arendt correct. The schools served as a battleground in the ideological conflicts of the 1950s. Beginning with the genealogy of progressive education, and ending with the formation of New Left and New Right thought, Education and the Cold War offers a fresh perspective on the postwar transformation in U.S. political culture by way of an examination of the educational history of that era.

John Dewey and the Paradox of Liberal ReformJohn Dewey and the Paradox of Liberal Reform



This book provides a fresh critique of John Dewey and the progressive tradition and warns against the superficial renaissance of Deweyan philosophy present in many of today's modern liberal educational reform movements.

Author: William Andrew Paringer

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791402533

Category:

Page: 215

View: 710

This book provides a fresh critique of John Dewey and the progressive tradition and warns against the superficial renaissance of Deweyan philosophy present in many of today's modern liberal educational reform movements. Challenging the four pillars of Dewey's pragmatism--science, nature, democracy, experience--Paringer argues for a critical or radical education praxis that more sensitively comes to grips with the difficulties of teh nuclearized, postmodern world.

The Promise of PragmatismThe Promise of Pragmatism



Diggins also examines the work of the neopragmatists Jurgen Habermas and Richard Rorty and their attempt to resolve the crisis of postmodernism.

Author: John Patrick Diggins

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226148793

Category:

Page: 515

View: 890

For much of our century, pragmatism has enjoyed a charmed life, holding the dominant point of view in American politics, law, education, and social thought in general. After suffering a brief eclipse in the post-World War II period, pragmatism has enjoyed a revival, especially in literary theory and such areas as poststructuralism and deconstruction. In this sweeping critique of pragmatism and neopragmatism, one of our leading intellectual historians traces the attempts of thinkers from William James to Richard Rorty to find a response to the crisis of modernism. John Patrick Diggins analyzes the limitations of pragmatism from a historical perspective and dares to ask whether America's one original contribution to the world of philosophy has actually fulfilled its promise. In the late nineteenth century, intellectuals felt themselves in the grips of a spiritual crisis. This confrontation with the "acids of modernity" eroded older faiths and led to a sense that life would continue in the awareness, of absences: knowledge without truth, power without authority, society without spirit, self without identity, politics without virtue, existence without purpose, history without meaning. In Europe, Friedrich Nietzsche and Max Weber faced a world in which God was "dead" and society was succumbing to structures of power and domination. In America, Henry Adams resigned from Harvard when he realized there were no truths to be taught and when he could only conclude: "Experience ceases to educate." To the American philosophers of pragmatism, it was experience that provided the basis on which new methods of knowing could replace older ideas of truth. Diggins examines how, in different ways, William James, Charles Peirce, John Dewey, George H. Mead, and Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., demonstrated that modernism posed no obstacle in fields such as science, education, religion, law, politics, and diplomacy. Diggins also examines the work of the neopragmatists Jurgen Habermas and Richard Rorty and their attempt to resolve the crisis of postmodernism. Using one author to interrogate another, Diggins brilliantly allows the ideas to speak to our conditions as well as theirs. Did the older philosophers succeed in fulfilling the promises of pragmatism? Can the neopragmatists write their way out of what they have thought themselves into? And does America need philosophers to tell us that we do not need foundational truths when the Founders already told us that the Constitution would be a "machine" that would depend more upon the "counterpoise" of power than on the claims of knowledge? Diggins addresses these and other essential questions in this magisterial account of twentieth-century intellectual life. It should be read by everyone concerned about the roots of postmodernism (and its links to pragmatism) and about the forms of thought and action available for confronting a world after postmodernism.

Dissertation Abstracts InternationalDissertation Abstracts International



This dissertation suggests that the more important reason underlying grupo
behavior in the crisis was their unique dependence on the state . ... large
segments of contemporary Anglo - American society and is the ethos that has
impelled the rise of modern - liberalism ... Hypotheses that described the political
socialization effects of service programs drew partially on the educational theory
of John Dewey .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105110578783

Category:

Page:

View: 786

Abstracts of dissertations available on microfilm or as xerographic reproductions.

Pluralism Pragmatism and American DemocracyPluralism Pragmatism and American Democracy



This book presents the author’s many and varied contributions to the revival and re-evaluation of American pragmatism.

Author: H.G. Callaway

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443873789

Category:

Page: 320

View: 386

This book presents the author’s many and varied contributions to the revival and re-evaluation of American pragmatism. The assembled critical perspective on contemporary pragmatism in philosophy emphasizes the American tradition of cultural pluralism and the requirements of American democracy. Based partly on a survey of the literature on interest-group pluralism and critical perspectives on the politics of globalization, the monograph argues for reasoned caution concerning the practical effects of the revival. Undercurrents of “vulgar pragmatism” including both moral and epistemic relativism threaten the intellectual and moral integrity of American thought – and have contributed to the present sense of political crisis. The text chiefly contributes to the evaluation of the contemporary influence of the philosophy of John Dewey (1859–1952) and his late development of the classical pragmatist tradition. In comparison to Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882), William James (1842–1910), and earlier currents of American thought, Dewey’s philosophy, dominated by its overall emphasis on unification, is weaker in its support for the pluralism of cultural and religious contributions which have lent moral self-restraint to American policy and politics, both foreign and domestic. With all due homage to Dewey’s conception of philosophy, centered on human problems and the need for our ameliorative efforts, the argument is that in the contemporary revival, Dewey’s thought has been too often captured by “post-modernist” bandwagons of self-promotion and institutional control. This work defends democratic individualism against more collectivist and corporatist tendencies in contemporary neo-pragmatism, and it draws upon up-to-date political analysis in defense of America’s long republican tradition. Pragmatism will not and cannot be removed from, or ignored, in American intellectual and moral history; and its influence on disciplines from law to politics, sociology and literary criticism has been immense. However, pragmatism has often been weak in commitment to cultural pluralism and in its accounts of truth.

Crisis and Hope in American EducationCrisis and Hope in American Education



This book evaluates the educational system of the United States from schools for the young up to universities and various forms of adult education. It is not confined to the evaluation of intellectual achievement.

Author: Robert Ulich

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351524919

Category:

Page: 251

View: 269

This book evaluates the educational system of the United States from schools for the young up to universities and various forms of adult education. It is not confined to the evaluation of intellectual achievement. Rather it tries to arrive at some judgment as to whether schools help people acquire the degree of maturity necessary for participation in the work of a nation called upon to assume world responsibilities. Education, rightly conceived, is the process by which a growing person, according to his individual capacity, is prepared to understand himself, his place in society, his relation to the universe, and to act upon this understanding. A nation, to whatever extent it can afford to do so, should help future generations to strive for such achievements. But although this obligation is generally accepted by the American citizen, its practical requirements are still not fully understood. A classic soon after its original publication, this book is timelier today than ever. The author convincingly articulates the view that all our efforts at raising the intellectual and moral standards in our high schools are doomed to failure unless we boldly pair the right subject with the right talent. He demonstrates how we can achieve this without rejecting the precious heritage that is our tradition of free secondary schooling for all who can profit by it: his goal is nothing less than the creative combination of quality and justice in education. Ulich's prescriptions for education are bold and prac1/4tical. The boldness is best characterized by his contro1/4versial suggestion that the emotional sphere serves as the means of unifying the highly diverse American society. We see the influence of modern theory and its disenchantment with the merely intellectual theory as a basis for understanding, communication, and meaning. The institution that Ulich proposes is an "ideal" one, but it is described in considerable detail. Its buildings, facilities, curriculum, and informal programs are designed to provide shared emotional experiences while retaining the need for intellectual differentiation. 1/4

Reconstructing Mass Communication TheoryReconstructing Mass Communication Theory



John Dewey and the Crisis of American Liberalism . " Antioch Review , 29 ( 1969
) , 218-32 . Huxley , Julian Sorrel . UNESCO : Its purpose and Philosophy .
Washington , D. C .: Public Affairs Press , 1948 . Innis , Harold Adams . The Bias
of ...

Author: John Durham Peters

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:36105010406895

Category:

Page: 336

View: 548

John Dewey and the Decline of American EducationJohn Dewey and the Decline of American Education



Indeed, in this period of crisis in American schools, a sound understanding of ... Alan Ryan's John Dewey and the High Tide of American Liberalism (1997), ...

Author: Henry Edmondson

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 9781497648920

Category:

Page: 200

View: 580

The influence of John Dewey’s undeniably pervasive ideas on the course of American education during the last half-century has been celebrated in some quarters and decried in others. But Dewey’s writings themselves have not often been analyzed in a sustained way. In John Dewey and the Decline of American Education, Hank Edmondson takes up that task. He begins with an account of the startling authority with which Dewey’s fundamental principles have been—and continue to be—received within the U.S. educational establishment. Edmondson then shows how revolutionary these principles are in light of the classical and Christian traditions. Finally, he persuasively demonstrates that Dewey has had an insidious effect on American democracy through the baneful impact his core ideas have had in our nation’s classrooms. Few people are pleased with the performance of our public schools. Eschewing polemic in favor of understanding, Edmondson’s study of the “patron saint” of those schools sheds much-needed light on both the ideas that bear much responsibility for their decline and the alternative principles that could spur their recovery.

Political Thought in AmericaPolitical Thought in America



He was active in founding the Liberal party in 1946 and supported the American
Civil Liberties Union and the NAACP . ... John Dewey Liberalism and Social
Action ( 1935 ) The net effect of the struggle of early liber - als to emancipate
individuals from ... of the latter part of the nineteenth centurya conflict that has
grown more intense with the passing years — the crisis could no longer be
covered up .

Author: Michael B. Levy

Publisher:

ISBN: 0256060738

Category:

Page: 595

View: 547

American political theory is best studied in context--intellectual, political, economic and so on--as a conceptual activity aimed at influencing specific and tangible ends. The text of this book builds on Robert Dahl's view that America has made a series of "historical commitments" that have fundamentally altered the course of American polity. These are: independence; the extended federal republic and constitution; egalitarian market democracy; industrial capitalism; and American internationalism. The book contains seven parts, beginning with a contextual introduction, and followed by a part for each of the decisions mentioned above. In Parts II through VII, each section begins with the Old Orthodoxy, or the political language and set of arguments that must be defeated. This is followed by the New Orthodoxy. ISBN 0-256-06073-8 (pbk.): $20.00.