A Commentary on Euripides Iphigenia in TaurisA Commentary on Euripides Iphigenia in Tauris



This work is the first major commentary on Euripides' Iphigenia in Tauris to appear in English in more than 65 years.

Author: Poulheria Kyriakou

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110190990

Category:

Page: 504

View: 168

This work is the first major commentary on Euripides' Iphigenia in Tauris to appear in English in more than 65 years. It offers detailed analysis of a fascinating play that scholars so far had considered mainly as a source of information about Athenian cult and viewed as a romantic adventure story with happy end. Apart from including sober assessments of textual, linguistic and metrical problems, the commentary sheds new light on the play's treatment of myth, its intricate structure, presentation of character, and place in Euripides' work. In particular it offers fresh insights into the play's relationship to the literary tradition, especially its treatment of the crimes of the Pelopids, and its presentation of the complex, ambiguous relationship of humans and gods as well as that of Greeks and barbarians. Unlike most other tragedies, Iphigenia in Tauris does not feature any villain and avoids concentrating on past crimes and their corrosive influence on the characters' present. The Taurians are not portrayed simply as savage and slow barbarians and Iphigenia, the most intelligent character, fails to transcend her limitations. Religion and cult in both myth and contemporary Athens are a mixture of traditional and invented elements and the play as a whole turns out to be an intriguing and unique experiment in Euripides' career.

Iphigenia in TaurisIphigenia in Tauris



Beneath your leafy gloom, ye waving boughs Of this old, shady, consecrated grove, As in the goddess' silent sanctuary, With the same shudd'ring feeling forth I step, As when I trod it first, nor ever here Doth my unquiet spirit feel at home ...

Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 9781465591210

Category:

Page:

View: 487

Beneath your leafy gloom, ye waving boughs Of this old, shady, consecrated grove, As in the goddess' silent sanctuary, With the same shudd'ring feeling forth I step, As when I trod it first, nor ever here Doth my unquiet spirit feel at home. Long as the mighty will, to which I bow, Hath kept me here conceal'd, still, as at first, I feel myself a stranger. For the sea Doth sever me, alas! from those I love, And day by day upon the shore I stand, My soul still seeking for the land of Greece. But to my sighs, the hollow-sounding waves Bring, save their own hoarse murmurs, no reply. Alas for him! who friendless and alone, Remote from parents and from brethren dwells; From him grief snatches every coming joy Ere it doth reach his lip. His restless thoughts Revert for ever to his father's halls, Where first to him the radiant sun unclos'd The gates of heav'n; where closer, day by day, Brothers and sisters, leagu'd in pastime sweet, Around each other twin'd the bonds of love. I will not judge the counsel of the gods;

Iphigenia in TaurisIphigenia in Tauris



Iphigenia in Tauris tells the story of the princess Iphigenia who was sacrificed by her father Agamemnon to expedite his campaign against Troy but was rescued by the goddess Artemis and transported to the land of the Taurians.

Author: Euripides

Publisher: Classical Texts

ISBN: 9780856686528

Category:

Page: 283

View: 138

Iphigenia in Tauris tells the story of the princess Iphigenia who was sacrificed by her father Agamemnon to expedite his campaign against Troy but was rescued by the goddess Artemis and transported to the land of the Taurians. There she herself must perform human sacrifices as a priestess of Artemis in the local cult.

Iphigenia in TaurisIphigenia in Tauris



Scene 1: Since Diana saved her from death (her father Agamemnon chose to sacrifice her in return for a favourable wind for Troy), Iphigenia has been serving as her priestess on Tauris.

Author: Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Publisher:

ISBN: 9798637141111

Category:

Page: 68

View: 603

Scene 1: Since Diana saved her from death (her father Agamemnon chose to sacrifice her in return for a favourable wind for Troy), Iphigenia has been serving as her priestess on Tauris. Although she is grateful to the goddess, and although she is held in high regard by King Thoas and his people, she longs more and more to return to her homeland. "And days together stand I on the shore, / seeking, in my soul, the land of Greece .."She laments her life as a woman in a foreign land, recognising that her normal fate would have been to be tied to a husband. "Woman's fate is lamentable ... / how narrow the limits to her happiness!"She begs Diana to reunite her with her family: "And rescue me, you who rescued me from death, / from this, the second death that I am living here."Scene 2: Arkas, the confidant of Thoas, King of Tauris, announces the King's arrival. Iphigenia admits her homesickness to him. Arkas reminds her of all the good she has done in Tauris, for example, ending the custom of sacrificing all strangers on Diana's altar. He explains that the King is coming to ask for her hand, and he advises her to accept. Iphigenia declines: marriage would tie her to Tauris for ever.Scene 3: Thoas makes his suit. Iphigenia justifies her refusal by her longing for Greece, and does her best to add other sound reasons, such as the curse that lies on her family, which condemns all the descendants of Tantalus to kill each other. She gives several examples. Thoas is not dissuaded, but Iphigenia now calls on Diana: "Has not the goddess, who rescued me, / and she alone, the right to my dedicated life?"Thoas threatens to reintroduce the old custom of human sacrifice, which she would be obliged to carry out, rather than allow her to leave.Scene 4: Iphigenia prays to Diana: she places her faith in the goodness and justice of the Gods, and she begs her to spare her from having to sacrifice innocent victims.

Iphigenia in TaurisIphigenia in Tauris



SCENE I. A Grove before the Temple of Diana.

Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783749406586

Category:

Page: 65

View: 311

SCENE I. A Grove before the Temple of Diana. IPHIGENIA. Beneath your leafy gloom, ye waving boughs Of this old, shady, consecrated grove, As in the goddess' silent sanctuary, With the same shudd'ring feeling forth I step, As when I trod it first, nor ever here Doth my unquiet spirit feel at home. Long as the mighty will, to which I bow, Hath kept me here conceal'd, still, as at first, I feel myself a stranger. For the sea Doth sever me, alas! from those I love, And day by day upon the shore I stand, My soul still seeking for the land of Greece. But to my sighs, the hollow-sounding waves Bring, save their own hoarse murmurs, no reply. Alas for him! who friendless and alone, Remote from parents and from brethren dwells; From him grief snatches every coming joy Ere it doth reach his lip. His restless thoughts Revert for ever to his father's halls, Where first to him the radiant sun unclos'd The gates of heav'n; where closer, day by day, Brothers and sisters, leagu'd in pastime sweet, Around each other twin'd the bonds of love. I will not judge the counsel of the gods;

Iphigenia in TaurisIphigenia in Tauris



Scene 1: Since Diana saved her from death (her father Agamemnon chose to sacrifice her in return for a favourable wind for Troy), Iphigenia has been serving as her priestess on Tauris.

Author: Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Publisher:

ISBN: 9798637141128

Category:

Page: 68

View: 166

Scene 1: Since Diana saved her from death (her father Agamemnon chose to sacrifice her in return for a favourable wind for Troy), Iphigenia has been serving as her priestess on Tauris. Although she is grateful to the goddess, and although she is held in high regard by King Thoas and his people, she longs more and more to return to her homeland. "And days together stand I on the shore, / seeking, in my soul, the land of Greece .."She laments her life as a woman in a foreign land, recognising that her normal fate would have been to be tied to a husband. "Woman's fate is lamentable ... / how narrow the limits to her happiness!"She begs Diana to reunite her with her family: "And rescue me, you who rescued me from death, / from this, the second death that I am living here."Scene 2: Arkas, the confidant of Thoas, King of Tauris, announces the King's arrival. Iphigenia admits her homesickness to him. Arkas reminds her of all the good she has done in Tauris, for example, ending the custom of sacrificing all strangers on Diana's altar. He explains that the King is coming to ask for her hand, and he advises her to accept. Iphigenia declines: marriage would tie her to Tauris for ever.Scene 3: Thoas makes his suit. Iphigenia justifies her refusal by her longing for Greece, and does her best to add other sound reasons, such as the curse that lies on her family, which condemns all the descendants of Tantalus to kill each other. She gives several examples. Thoas is not dissuaded, but Iphigenia now calls on Diana: "Has not the goddess, who rescued me, / and she alone, the right to my dedicated life?"Thoas threatens to reintroduce the old custom of human sacrifice, which she would be obliged to carry out, rather than allow her to leave.Scene 4: Iphigenia prays to Diana: she places her faith in the goodness and justice of the Gods, and she begs her to spare her from having to sacrifice innocent victims.

Euripides Iphigenia in TaurisEuripides Iphigenia in Tauris



Iphigenia in Tauris tells the story of the princess Iphigenia who was sacrificed by her father Agamemnon to expedite his campaign against Troy but was rescued by the goddess Artemis and transported to the land of the Taurians.

Author: M. J. Cropp

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9781800346208

Category:

Page:

View: 713

Iphigenia in Tauris tells the story of the princess Iphigenia who was sacrificed by her father Agamemnon to expedite his campaign against Troy but was rescued by the goddess Artemis and transported to the land of the Taurians. There she herself must perform human sacrifices as a priestess of Artemis in the local cult.

The Iphigenia in Tauris of EuripidesThe Iphigenia in Tauris of Euripides



Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read.

Author: Euripides

Publisher: Good Press

ISBN: EAN:4057664620071

Category:

Page: 50

View: 837

"The Iphigenia in Tauris of Euripides" by Euripides (translated by Gilbert Murray). Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

Adventures with Iphigenia in TaurisAdventures with Iphigenia in Tauris



This book presents a cultural history of the Greek tragedy and its influence on subsequent Greek and Roman art and literature.

Author: Edith Hall

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195392890

Category:

Page: 378

View: 651

Adventures with Iphigenia in Tauris provides a rich narrative of the cultural history and influence of an oft-overlooked Euripidean tragedy