The Earliest Life of Gregory the GreatThe Earliest Life of Gregory the Great



Although crude in its latinity and idiosyncratic in its presentation, this work is a fascinating source of early traditions about the conversion of the English - including the famous story of Gregory's encounter with the Anglian slave boys ...

Author: Anonymous Monk of Whitby

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521313848

Category:

Page: 180

View: 703

In his role of apostle of the English and promoter of Augustine's mission, Gregory the Great became the subject of what is one of the earliest pieces of literature surviving from the Anglo-Saxon period: a Life written by an unknown author at Whitby around 680-704. Although crude in its latinity and idiosyncratic in its presentation, this work is a fascinating source of early traditions about the conversion of the English - including the famous story of Gregory's encounter with the Anglian slave boys - and an important witness to the veneration felt for the saint himself. It casts valuable light on English history in the seventh century, particularly on the career of Edwin of Northumbria, and is the source of two of the most famous legends of the Middle Ages, the Mass of St Gregory and the story of Trajan's rescue from hell. The Life of Gregory seems to be the earliest of the Saints' lives of this period and it is in many ways the most remarkable.

Gregory the GreatGregory the Great



This volume provides a biographical and intellectual context to Gregory the Great, and new translations of his most influential writings.

Author: Senior Lecturer in History John Moorhead

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0415233895

Category:

Page: 177

View: 390

Gregory's life culminated in his holding the office of pope (590 - 604). He is generally regarded as one of the outstanding figures in the long line of popes, and by the late ninth century had come to be known as 'the Great'. Along with Ambrose, Jerome and Augustine, he played a critical role in the history of his time, while during the middle ages his intellectual influence was second only to that of Augustine. This volume provides a biographical and intellectual context to Gregory the Great, and new translations of his most influential writings.

Reading the Gospels with Gregory the GreatReading the Gospels with Gregory the Great



Gregory the Great (c. 560-604 C.E.) occupies a key position in the development of Christian commentary on the Scriptures.

Author: Pope Gregory I

Publisher: St Bede's Publications

ISBN: 1879007444

Category:

Page: 122

View: 787

Gregory the Great (c. 560-604 C.E.) occupies a key position in the development of Christian commentary on the Scriptures. Pope and political leader during a chaotic era of transition in the history of Western Europe, he may be best known for his famous encounter with English children in the Roman slave market and his commissioning of St. Augustine of Canterbury's subsequent mission to England. Gregory's "Homilies on the Gospels" were first preached in 591-92, early in his papacy, and were very popular for their vigorous and engaging style. Using simple words to preach to the nobles and common people of Rome, Gregory employs metaphors, analogies, stories and images to answer basic questions of faith. His exegetical interpretation may often seem simplistic to the modern reader, but shows his dependence on earlier patristic tradition and reveals his pastoral heart. -- Book cover.

Gregory the GreatGregory the Great



Gregory the Great (bishop of Rome from 590 to 604) is one of the most significant figures in the history of Christianity.

Author: George E. Demacopoulos

Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess

ISBN: 9780268077860

Category:

Page: 240

View: 485

Gregory the Great (bishop of Rome from 590 to 604) is one of the most significant figures in the history of Christianity. His theological works framed medieval Christian attitudes toward mysticism, exegesis, and the role of the saints in the life of the church. The scale of Gregory's administrative activity in both the ecclesial and civic affairs of Rome also helped to make possible the formation of the medieval papacy. Gregory disciplined malcontent clerics, negotiated with barbarian rulers, and oversaw the administration of massive estates that employed thousands of workers. Scholars have often been perplexed by the two sides of Gregory—the monkish theologian and the calculating administrator. George E. Demacopoulos's study is the first to advance the argument that there is a clear connection between the pontiff's thought and his actions. By exploring unique aspects of Gregory's ascetic theology, wherein the summit of Christian perfection is viewed in terms of service to others, Demacopoulos argues that the very aspects of Gregory's theology that made him distinctive were precisely the factors that structured his responses to the practical crises of his day. With a comprehensive understanding of Christian history that resists the customary bifurcation between Christian East and Christian West, Demacopoulos situates Gregory within the broader movements of Christianity and the Roman world that characterize the shift from late antiquity to the early Middle Ages. This fresh reading of Gregory's extensive theological and practical works underscores the novelty and nuance of Gregory as thinker and bishop.

Gregory the GreatGregory the Great



In these essays Gregory emerges as a figure both interpreting and interpreted: interpreting the past, receiving, synthesizing, and developing the teachings of earlier writers, and, by this very process, presenting a persuasive theological ...

Author: John C. Cavadini

Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess

ISBN: 9780268077075

Category:

Page: 240

View: 198

A group of renowned North American scholars gathered at the University of Notre Dame in 1993 for a symposium on Pope Gregory the Great (550–604). This volume presents essays delivered at the conference, together with additional contributions. In these essays Gregory emerges as a figure both interpreting and interpreted: interpreting the past, receiving, synthesizing, and developing the teachings of earlier writers, and, by this very process, presenting a persuasive theological and pastoral agenda which has inspired projects of interpretation and development in later periods up to and including our own.

The Life of St BenedictThe Life of St Benedict



The famous, classic life of St. Benedict, filled with miracles, holy stories and inspiring idealism. Delightful reading for all ages. Describes much of what is known about St. Benedict, including the founding of the Benedictine order.

Author: Pope St. Gregory the Great

Publisher: TAN Books

ISBN: 9781505103366

Category:

Page: 70

View: 366

The famous, classic life of St. Benedict, filled with miracles, holy stories and inspiring idealism. Delightful reading for all ages. Describes much of what is known about St. Benedict, including the founding of the Benedictine order.

Gregory the Great on the Song of SongsGregory the Great on the Song of Songs



This volume includes translations of Gregory the Greats work Exposition on the Song of Songs, as well as the florilegia compiled by Paterius (Gregorys secretary) and the Venerable Bede, and, finally, William of Saint Thierrys Excerpts from ...

Author: Mark DelCogliano

Publisher: Liturgical Press

ISBN: 9780879072445

Category:

Page: 326

View: 254

In his literary corpus, Gregory the Great (+604) encapsulated the best of patristic theology and spirituality, bequeathing a rich legacy to generations of Christians who lived after him. Nowhere is this more clearly seen than in his exegesis of the Song of Songs. Gregorys interpretation of this popular Old Testament book not only owes much to Christian exegetes who preceded him, such as Origen, but also profoundly influenced later Western Latin exegetes of the Song, such as Bernard of Clairvaux. Gregory wrote a short commentary on the Song of Songs, and his voluminous writings are filled with interpretations of this biblical book. Later monastic writers combed through his corpus and compiled excerpts in which he interpreted passages from the Song of Songs. This volume includes translations of Gregory the Greats work Exposition on the Song of Songs, as well as the florilegia compiled by Paterius (Gregorys secretary) and the Venerable Bede, and, finally, William of Saint Thierrys Excerpts from the Books of Blessed Gregory on the Song of Songs. It is now the key resource for reading and studying Gregorys interpretation of the Song of Songs.

Saint Gregory the GreatSaint Gregory the Great



From this point of view, the empire in the West had not really fallen. Thus, in the early 6th century, a kind of stability had taken root in the West. Gaul was ruled by the Franks, Spain by the Visigoths, and Italy by the Ostrogoths.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: 9798647476203

Category:

Page: 106

View: 382

*Includes pictures *Includes excerpts of medieval accounts *Includes a bibliography for further reading "No one does more harm in the Church than he who has the title or rank of holiness and acts perversely."-St. Gregory the Great The pope, the bishop of Rome, claims spiritual authority over more than a billion Catholics worldwide. He also exercises temporal authority over a tiny enclave of Rome consisting of the Vatican Palace, Saint Peter's Basilica, and 44 hectares with the ancient Leonine Walls. As Sovereign of the Vatican City States, he has around 1,000 subjects, mostly clerics. While those facts are widely known, many are not familiar with the fact that before the reunification of Italy in the late 19th century, the popes were rulers not only of the city of Rome but of much of central Italy for over a thousand years. The Papal States, as they are usually referred to, were formally gifted to the Church by the Frankish King Pepin III (r.751-768) in 756, but the origins of the Papal States can be traced back over 150 years earlier. One of the most prominent figures in the foundation of the Papal States was Pope Gregory I, who led the Roman Church and the city of Rome from 590-604. During his time, Rome enjoyed the prominence in Italy it once had before being sacked in the late 5th century, and Pope Gregory I helped ensure that the Eternal City would shape the destiny of Western Europe, not the Byzantine capital of Constantinople. In the wake of the Western Roman Empire's collapse, kings across Western Europe continued to maintain the appearance of imperial unity and claimed the status of lawful subjects of the Eastern Roman Empire, then based out of Constantinople. Thus, the Germanic kings adorned themselves with the ceremonial regalia of the Roman court, adopted the religion of the emperor, and continued to govern as the emperors had done. For example, the leader of the Franks ruled Gaul as Rex Romanorum ("King of the Romans"), and even Odoacer, who had dared to depose the last Western Roman emperor, ruled by the grace of Emperor Zeno (r. 474-491) in Constantinople. Indeed, it has been argued that for the great majority of Romans in the West, nothing really changed, as they continued to be governed by Roman law, to observe their customs and to practice their religion. The governing classes had been supplanted, but they were generally content to govern their subjects as their imperial predecessors had done. From this point of view, the empire in the West had not really fallen. Thus, in the early 6th century, a kind of stability had taken root in the West. Gaul was ruled by the Franks, Spain by the Visigoths, and Italy by the Ostrogoths. In Italy, the people maintained their ties with the emperor in Constantinople, now viewed as the new Rome, and the Byzantine Empire was wealthy, strong, and confident. Although the Germanic kingdoms deferred to Constantinople in name only, they did not wish to destroy Roman civilization, and while this new order was not perfect as far as Constantinople was concerned, it at least offered stability. This would all change during the late 6th century, and in the middle of it all was the papacy. Under the leadership of Gregory I, the political and religious tumult of the era would help give rise to modern Europe. Saint Gregory the Great: The History of the Early Middle Ages' Most Influential Pope and the Rise of the Papal States examines how Gregory I led the Church, and the way his time in power permanently impacted the world. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about Gregory the Great like never before.

The Life of St Benedict Gregory the GreatThe Life of St Benedict Gregory the Great



Preeminent monastic scholar Adalbert de Vogue analyzes and comments on Book II of the Dialogues of Pope Saint Gregory the Great -- the Life of Saint Benedict, Father of Western monasticism and Patron of Europe.

Author: Adalbert de Vogüé

Publisher: St Bede's Publications

ISBN: 0932506771

Category:

Page: 186

View: 252

Preeminent monastic scholar Adalbert de Vogue analyzes and comments on Book II of the Dialogues of Pope Saint Gregory the Great -- the Life of Saint Benedict, Father of Western monasticism and Patron of Europe. Full of wisdom, insight and refreshing anecdotes.

Gregory the GreatGregory the Great



Ever the preacher and teacher, Gregory wishes his audience to learn the wisdom
the universe teaches, particularly the lessons ... Three older works are useful: F.
Homes Dudden, Gregory the Great (London, 1905), 2.374-92; Franz Lieblang, ...

Author: Carole Straw

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520909878

Category:

Page: 316

View: 616

Gregory I (590-604) is often considered the first medieval pope and the first exponent of a truly medieval spirituality. Carole Straw places Gregory in his historical context and considers the many facets of his personality—monk, preacher, and pope—in order to elucidate the structure of his thought and present a unified, thematic interpretation of his spiritual concerns.

Pastoral RulePastoral Rule



Pastoral Rule, written around 590 A.D. by Pope Gregory I , outlines the role of the clergy. It was immensely influential, and Byzantine Emperor Maurice ordered that it be translated into Greek and given to every bishop.

Author: Gregory the Great

Publisher: Wyatt North Publishing, LLC

ISBN: 9781647980023

Category:

Page: 134

View: 259

Pastoral Rule, written around 590 A.D. by Pope Gregory I , outlines the role of the clergy. It was immensely influential, and Byzantine Emperor Maurice ordered that it be translated into Greek and given to every bishop.

The Dialogues of Gregory the GreatThe Dialogues of Gregory the Great



This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

Author: Pope Gregory I

Publisher: Franklin Classics

ISBN: 0342809830

Category:

Page: 88

View: 950

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.