Kierkegaard s Journals and Notebooks Volume 3Kierkegaard s Journals and Notebooks Volume 3



1 (→ 101,3), chap. 2, chap. 3 (→ 104,26), and chap. 4 (→ 105,4, → 108,1). 3 I Goethes Mutter] cf. Falk, Goethe (→ 101,1), chap. 1, “Goethe's Mutter. Einige Beiträge zu ihrer Charakteristik” [Contributions to a Description of ...

Author: Søren Kierkegaard

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691138930

Category:

Page: 846

View: 784

Søren Kierkegaard (1813-55) published an extraordinary number of works during his lifetime, but he left behind nearly as much unpublished writing, most of which consists of what are called his "journals and notebooks." Volume 3 of this 11-volume edition of Kierkegaard's Journals and Notebooks includes Kierkegaard's extensive notes on lectures by the Danish theologian H. N. Clausen and by the German philosopher Schelling, as well as a great many other entries on philosophical, theological, and literary topics. In addition, the volume includes many personal reflections by Kierkegaard, notably those in which he provides an account of his love affair with Regine Olsen, his onetime fiancée.

The Reception of Classical German Literature in England 1760 1860 Volume 3The Reception of Classical German Literature in England 1760 1860 Volume 3



Volume 2 Reviews published from 1813 to 1835 . Volume 3 Reviews published from 1835 to 1860 . PART II Reviews of individual authors , excluding Goethe and Schiller , with volumes arranged chronologically by date of author's birth .

Author: John Boening

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000765199

Category:

Page: 580

View: 942

The extensive scope of this collection means that this documentary record of the reception of German literature in England is a valuable scholarly resource. One of the most important features of British literary and intellectual history over the past 250 years is the influence of German literature. From the second half of the 18th Century, through the first decades of the 19th, German books and ideas attracted, then gained the attention of a nation. Despite the acknowledged importance of the influence on writers such as Coleridge and Carlyle the subject, though often alluded to, was rarely studied. This collection provides a guidebook through the masses of periodical and allows the English side of the Anglo-German literary relationship to be explored in detail. In order to make the collection useful to scholars with a wide range of interest, it has been divided into three parts: Part 1 is a chronological presentation of commentary on German literature in general. It also contains collective reviews of multiple German authors, notices of important anthologies and reactions to influential works about Germany and its culture. Part 2 collects reviews of 18th Century individual German authors and Part 3 is devoted to the English reception of Goethe and Schiller. Parts 2 & 3 contain cross-references to the collective reviews of Part 1. Containing over 200 British serials and articles and reviews from all the major English literary periodicals, the collection also includes a broad sampling of opinion from the more general magazines, including some popular religious publications.

Chips From a German Workshop Vol III Chips From a German Workshop Vol III



Volume 3 Friedrich Max Muller. took place Goethe has himself described, in a paper entitled “Happy Incidents.” But no happy incident could have led to that glorious friendship, which stands alone in the literary history of the whole ...

Author: Friedrich Max Muller

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783752412406

Category:

Page: 353

View: 394

Reproduction of the original: Chips From a German Workshop. Vol. III. by Friedrich Max Muller

Life Of Mozart Volume 3 of 3 Life Of Mozart Volume 3 of 3



13 Anh.] 14 (return) [ Goethe, TagVund Jahreshefte, 1791 (Werke, XXI., p. 12).] 15 (return) [ Goethe, Ital. Reise (Werke, XIX., p. 360).] 16 (return) [ A. M. Z., 1864, pp. 465, 649.] 17 (return) [ The text is printed in Diezmann's ...

Author: Otto Jahn

Publisher: London Novello, Ewer & Co.

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 448

View: 663

Life Of Mozart (Volume 3 of 3) In publishing these six quartets together Mozart certainly did not intend them to be regarded in all their parts as one whole; his object was to bring to view the many-sidedness of expression and technical treatment of which this species of music was capable. The first quartet, in G major (387 K.), and the fourth, in E flat major (428 K.), have a certain relationship in their earnest and sustained tone; but how different is the expression of energetic decision in the first from that of contemplative reserve in the fourth; a difference most noticeable in the andantes of the two quartets. Again, in the third and fifth quartets, in B flat (458 K.) and A major (464 K.), the likeness in their general character is individualised by the difference in treatment throughout. The second quartet, in D minor (421 K.), and the sixth, in C major (465 K.), stand alone; the former by its affecting expression of melancholy, the latter by its revelation of that higher peace to which a noble mind attains through strife and suffering. An equal wealth of characterisation and technical elaboration meets us in a comparison of the separate movements. The ground-plan of the first movement is the usual one, and the centre of gravity is always the working-out at the beginning of the second part, which is therefore distinguished by its length as a principal portion of the movement. The working-out of each quartet is peculiar to itself. In the two SIX QUARTETS, 1785. first the principal subject is made the groundwork, and combined with the subordinate subject closing the first part, but quite differently worked-out. In the G major quartet the first subject is spun out into a florid figure, which is turned hither and thither, broken off by the entry of the second subject, again resumed, only to be again broken off in order, by an easy play on the closing bar—

The Reception of Classical German Literature in England 1760 1860 Volume 7The Reception of Classical German Literature in England 1760 1860 Volume 7



Volume 2 Reviews published from 1813 to 1835. Volume 3 Reviews published from 1835 to 1860. PART II Reviews of individual authors, excluding Goethe and Schiller, with volumes arranged chronologically by date of author's birth.

Author: John Boening

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000766127

Category:

Page: 516

View: 647

The extensive scope of this collection means that this documentary record of the reception of German literature in England is a valuable scholarly resource. One of the most important features of British literary and intellectual history over the past 250 years is the influence of German literature. From the second half of the 18th Century, through the first decades of the 19th, German books and ideas attracted, then gained the attention of a nation. Despite the acknowledged importance of the influence on writers such as Coleridge and Carlyle the subject, though often alluded to, was rarely studied. This collection provides a guidebook through the masses of periodical and allows the English side of the Anglo-German literary relationship to be explored in detail. In order to make the collection useful to scholars with a wide range of interest, it has been divided into three parts: Part 1 is a chronological presentation of commentary on German literature in general. It also contains collective reviews of multiple German authors, notices of important anthologies and reactions to influential works about Germany and its culture. Part 2 collects reviews of 18th Century individual German authors and Part 3 is devoted to the English reception of Goethe and Schiller. Parts 2 & 3 contain cross-references to the collective reviews of Part 1. Containing over 200 British serials and articles and reviews from all the major English literary periodicals, the collection also includes a broad sampling of opinion from the more general magazines, including some popular religious publications.

The Novel as ArchiveThe Novel as Archive



The Genesis, Reception, and Criticism of Goethe's Wilhelm Meisters Wanderjahre Ehrhard Bahr. Beutler , Ernst . “ Die vierfache ... Entsagung : Eine Studie zu Goethes Altersroman , Hermaea , volume 3. Tübingen : Niemeyer , 1954 ( second ...

Author: Ehrhard Bahr

Publisher: Camden House

ISBN: 1571130969

Category:

Page: 152

View: 893

Goethe's novel defined as a key work anticipating modernist novels of 20th century.

The Reception of Classical German Literature in England 1760 1860 Volume 6The Reception of Classical German Literature in England 1760 1860 Volume 6



Volume 2 Reviews published from 1813 to 1835 . Volume 3 Reviews published from 1835 to 1860 . PART II Reviews of individual authors , excluding Goethe and Schiller , with volumes arranged chronologically by date of author's birth .

Author: John Boening

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000765878

Category:

Page: 552

View: 309

The extensive scope of this collection means that this documentary record of the reception of German literature in England is a valuable scholarly resource. One of the most important features of British literary and intellectual history over the past 250 years is the influence of German literature. From the second half of the 18th Century, through the first decades of the 19th, German books and ideas attracted, then gained the attention of a nation. Despite the acknowledged importance of the influence on writers such as Coleridge and Carlyle the subject, though often alluded to, was rarely studied. This collection provides a guidebook through the masses of periodical and allows the English side of the Anglo-German literary relationship to be explored in detail. In order to make the collection useful to scholars with a wide range of interest, it has been divided into three parts: Part 1 is a chronological presentation of commentary on German literature in general. It also contains collective reviews of multiple German authors, notices of important anthologies and reactions to influential works about Germany and its culture. Part 2 collects reviews of 18th Century individual German authors and Part 3 is devoted to the English reception of Goethe and Schiller. Parts 2 & 3 contain cross-references to the collective reviews of Part 1. Containing over 200 British serials and articles and reviews from all the major English literary periodicals, the collection also includes a broad sampling of opinion from the more general magazines, including some popular religious publications.

The Reception of Classical German Literature in England 1760 1860 Volume 8The Reception of Classical German Literature in England 1760 1860 Volume 8



Volume 2 Reviews published from 1813 to 1835 . Volume 3 Reviews published from 1835 to 1860 . PART II Reviews of individual authors , excluding Goethe and Schiller , with volumes arranged chronologically by date of author's birth .

Author: John Boening

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000766240

Category:

Page: 522

View: 896

The extensive scope of this collection means that this documentary record of the reception of German literature in England is a valuable scholarly resource. One of the most important features of British literary and intellectual history over the past 250 years is the influence of German literature. From the second half of the 18th Century, through the first decades of the 19th, German books and ideas attracted, then gained the attention of a nation. Despite the acknowledged importance of the influence on writers such as Coleridge and Carlyle the subject, though often alluded to, was rarely studied. This collection provides a guidebook through the masses of periodical and allows the English side of the Anglo-German literary relationship to be explored in detail. In order to make the collection useful to scholars with a wide range of interest, it has been divided into three parts: Part 1 is a chronological presentation of commentary on German literature in general. It also contains collective reviews of multiple German authors, notices of important anthologies and reactions to influential works about Germany and its culture. Part 2 collects reviews of 18th Century individual German authors and Part 3 is devoted to the English reception of Goethe and Schiller. Parts 2 & 3 contain cross-references to the collective reviews of Part 1. Containing over 200 British serials and articles and reviews from all the major English literary periodicals, the collection also includes a broad sampling of opinion from the more general magazines, including some popular religious publications.

The Reception of Classical German Literature in England 1760 1860 Volume 5The Reception of Classical German Literature in England 1760 1860 Volume 5



Volume 2 Reviews published from 1813 to 1835 . Volume 3 Reviews published from 1835 to 1860 . PART II Reviews of individual authors , excluding Goethe and Schiller , with volumes arranged chronologically by date of author's birth .

Author: John Boening

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000765861

Category:

Page: 696

View: 781

The extensive scope of this collection means that this documentary record of the reception of German literature in England is a valuable scholarly resource. One of the most important features of British literary and intellectual history over the past 250 years is the influence of German literature. From the second half of the 18th Century, through the first decades of the 19th, German books and ideas attracted, then gained the attention of a nation. Despite the acknowledged importance of the influence on writers such as Coleridge and Carlyle the subject, though often alluded to, was rarely studied. This collection provides a guidebook through the masses of periodical and allows the English side of the Anglo-German literary relationship to be explored in detail. In order to make the collection useful to scholars with a wide range of interest, it has been divided into three parts: Part 1 is a chronological presentation of commentary on German literature in general. It also contains collective reviews of multiple German authors, notices of important anthologies and reactions to influential works about Germany and its culture. Part 2 collects reviews of 18th Century individual German authors and Part 3 is devoted to the English reception of Goethe and Schiller. Parts 2 & 3 contain cross-references to the collective reviews of Part 1. Containing over 200 British serials and articles and reviews from all the major English literary periodicals, the collection also includes a broad sampling of opinion from the more general magazines, including some popular religious publications.

The Reception of Classical German Literature in England 1760 1860 Volume 4The Reception of Classical German Literature in England 1760 1860 Volume 4



Volume 2 Reviews published from 1813 to 1835 . Volume 3 Reviews published from 1835 to 1860 . PART II Reviews of individual authors , excluding Goethe and Schiller , with volumes arranged chronologically by date of author's birth .

Author: John Boening

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000765588

Category:

Page: 640

View: 694

The extensive scope of this collection means that this documentary record of the reception of German literature in England is a valuable scholarly resource. One of the most important features of British literary and intellectual history over the past 250 years is the influence of German literature. From the second half of the 18th Century, through the first decades of the 19th, German books and ideas attracted, then gained the attention of a nation. Despite the acknowledged importance of the influence on writers such as Coleridge and Carlyle the subject, though often alluded to, was rarely studied. This collection provides a guidebook through the masses of periodical and allows the English side of the Anglo-German literary relationship to be explored in detail. In order to make the collection useful to scholars with a wide range of interest, it has been divided into three parts: Part 1 is a chronological presentation of commentary on German literature in general. It also contains collective reviews of multiple German authors, notices of important anthologies and reactions to influential works about Germany and its culture. Part 2 collects reviews of 18th Century individual German authors and Part 3 is devoted to the English reception of Goethe and Schiller. Parts 2 & 3 contain cross-references to the collective reviews of Part 1. Containing over 200 British serials and articles and reviews from all the major English literary periodicals, the collection also includes a broad sampling of opinion from the more general magazines, including some popular religious publications.