Epistolary KoreaEpistolary Korea



... Data Epistolary Korea : letters in the communicative space of the Choson, 1392–1910 / edited by ... Korean literature—To 1900—Translation into English.

Author: JaHyun Kim Haboush

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231519595

Category:

Page: 464

View: 603

By expanding the definition of "epistle" to include any writing that addresses the intended receiver directly, JaHyun Kim Haboush introduces readers to the rich epistolary practice of Chos?n Korea. The Chos?n dynasty (1392-1910) produced an abundance of epistles, writings that mirror the genres of neighboring countries (especially China) while retaining their own specific historical trajectory. Written in both literary Chinese and vernacular Korean, the writings collected here range from royal public edicts to private letters, a fascinating array that blurs the line between classical and everyday language and the divisions between men and women. Haboush's selections also recast the relationship between epistolography and the concept of public and private space. Haboush groups her epistles according to where they were written and read: public letters, letters to colleagues and friends, social letters, and family letters. Then she arranges them according to occasion: letters on leaving home, deathbed letters, letters of fiction, and letters to the dead. She examines the mechanics of epistles, their communicative space, and their cultural and political meaning. With its wholly unique collection of materials, Epistolary Korea produces more than a vivid chronicle of pre- and early modern Korean life. It breaks new ground in establishing the terms of a distinct, non-European form of epistolography.

Epistolary KoreaEpistolary Korea



With its wholly unique collection of materials, Epistolary Korea produces more than a vivid chronicle of pre- and early modern Korean life. It breaks new ground in establishing the terms of a distinct, non-European form of epistolography.

Author: JaHyun Kim Haboush

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231148030

Category:

Page: 464

View: 179

By expanding the definition of "epistle" to include any writing that addresses the intended receiver directly, JaHyun Kim Haboush introduces readers to the rich epistolary practice of Chos?n Korea. The Chos?n dynasty (1392-1910) produced an abundance of epistles, writings that mirror the genres of neighboring countries (especially China) while retaining their own specific historical trajectory. Written in both literary Chinese and vernacular Korean, the writings collected here range from royal public edicts to private letters, a fascinating array that blurs the line between classical and everyday language and the divisions between men and women. Haboush's selections also recast the relationship between epistolography and the concept of public and private space. Haboush groups her epistles according to where they were written and read: public letters, letters to colleagues and friends, social letters, and family letters. Then she arranges them according to occasion: letters on leaving home, deathbed letters, letters of fiction, and letters to the dead. She examines the mechanics of epistles, their communicative space, and their cultural and political meaning. With its wholly unique collection of materials, Epistolary Korea produces more than a vivid chronicle of pre- and early modern Korean life. It breaks new ground in establishing the terms of a distinct, non-European form of epistolography.

Epistolary KoreaEpistolary Korea



With its wholly unique collection of materials, "Epistolary Korea" produces more than a vivid chronicle of pre- and early modern Korean life. It breaks new ground in establishing the terms of a distinct, non-European form of epistolography.

Author: JaHyun Kim Haboush

Publisher:

ISBN: 6613629332

Category:

Page: 448

View: 911

"By expanding the definition of "epistle" to include any writing that addresses the intended receiver directly, JaHyun Kim Haboush introduces readers to the rich epistolary practice of Chosŏn Korea. The Chosŏn dynasty (1392-1910) produced an abundance of epistles, writings that mirror the genres of neighboring countries (especially China) while retaining their own specific historical trajectory. Written in both literary Chinese and vernacular Korean, the writings collected here range from royal public edicts to private letters, a fascinating array that blurs the line between classical and everyday language and the divisions between men and women. Haboush's selections also recast the relationship between epistolography and the concept of public and private space. Haboush groups her epistles according to where they were written and read : public letters, letters to colleagues and friends, social letters, and family letters. Then she arranges them according to occasion : letters on leaving home, deathbed letters, letters of fiction, and letters to the dead. She examines the mechanics of epistles, their communicative space, and their cultural and political meaning. With its wholly unique collection of materials, "Epistolary Korea" produces more than a vivid chronicle of pre- and early modern Korean life. It breaks new ground in establishing the terms of a distinct, non-European form of epistolography."--

A Concise History of KoreaA Concise History of Korea



Kichung Kim, Classical Korean Literature (Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharpe, 1996), 177–78. 17. Jahyun Kim Haboush, Epistolary Korea: Letters in the Communicative ...

Author: Michael J. Seth

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 9781538128992

Category:

Page: 616

View: 585

Now in a fully revised and updated edition including new primary sources and illustrations, this comprehensive book surveys Korean history from Neolithic times to the present. Michael J. Seth explores the origins and development of Korean society, politics, and still little-known cultural heritage from their inception to the two Korean states of today. Telling the remarkable story of the origins and evolution of a society that borrowed and adopted from abroad, Seth describes how various tribal peoples in the peninsula came together to form one of the world’s most distinctive communities. He shows how this ancient, culturally and ethnically homogeneous society was wrenched into the world of late-nineteenth-century imperialism, fell victim to Japanese expansionism, and then became arbitrarily divided into two opposed halves, North and South, after World War II. Tracing the post-war years since 1945, the book explains how the two Koreas, with their deeply different political and social systems and geopolitical orientations, evolved into sharply contrasting societies. South Korea, after an unpromising start, became one of the few postcolonial developing states to enter the ranks of the first world, with a globally competitive economy, a democratic political system, and a cosmopolitan and dynamic culture. North Korea, by contrast, became one of the world’s most totalitarian and isolated societies, a nuclear power with an impoverished and famine-stricken population. Seth describes and analyzes the radically different and historically unprecedented trajectories of the two Koreas, formerly one tight-knit society. Throughout, he adds a rare dimension by placing Korean history into broader global perspective. All readers looking for a balanced, knowledgeable history will be richly rewarded with this clear and concise book.

A Brief History of KoreaA Brief History of Korea



A Heritage of Kings: One Man's Monarchy in the Confucian World is highly recommended as is her two edited collections of private letters—Epistolary Korea: ...

Author: Michael J. Seth

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN: 9781462921119

Category:

Page: 288

View: 227

Exploring Korean history from its ancient roots to the present day, A Brief History of Korea is the story of a people with a rich and united culture that has become two Koreas in modern times—one isolated and secretive and the other among the world's most successful economies. Korean culture developed on a 600-mile-long peninsula, bordered on the north by mountains and three sides by the sea, set apart from the Asian mainland. Korea was one of the last countries in Asia to be visited by Westerners and its borders have remained largely unchanged since it was unified in the seventh century. Though it is one of the world's oldest and most ethnically homogeneous states, Korea was not born in a vacuum. Geographically isolated, the country was heavily influenced by powerful China and was often used as a bridge to the mainland by Japan. Calling themselves as "a shrimp among whales," Koreans borrowed elements of government, culture and religion all the while fiercely fighting to maintain independence from powerful neighbors. This fascinating book tells the story of Korean domestic dynasties, empires and states, as well as foreign conquest, occupation and division. Today, the two Koreas are starkly different—North Korea a nation closed to the world and South Korea an economic powerhouse and center of Asian democracy. Chronicling significant events right up through 2018's Singapore Summit, author Michael J. Seth presents a relevant, interesting and important history of Korea within a larger global context. Korea's history is a turbulent one, but ultimately the story of a resistant and resourceful people in search of lasting peace.

Korea a Very Short IntroductionKorea a Very Short Introduction



Breuker, Remco E. Establishing a Pluralist Society in Medieval Korea, ... Epistolary Korea: Letters in the Communicative Space of the Chosón, 1392–1910.

Author: Michael J. Seth

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780198830771

Category:

Page: 160

View: 734

Having spent centuries in the shadows of its neighbours China and Japan, Korea is now the object of considerable interest for radically different reasons-- the South as an economic success story and for its vibrant popular culture; the North as the home to one of the world's most repressive regimes, at once both bizarre and menacing. This Very Short Introduction explores the history, culture, and society of a deeply divided region. Michael Seth considers what it means to be Korean, and analyses how the various peoples of the Korean peninsula became one of the world's most homogeneous nations, before exploring how this nation evolved, in a single lifetime, into today's sharply contrasting societies. He also discusses how Korea fits into the larger narrative of both East Asian and world history, economically, politically, and socially. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

Park Chung Hee and Modern KoreaPark Chung Hee and Modern Korea



JaHyun Haboush, ed., Epistolary Korea: Letters in the Communicative Space of the Chosŏn, 1392–1910 (New York: Columbia University Press, 2009), 292.

Author: Carter J. Eckert

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674659865

Category:

Page: 472

View: 770

For South Koreans, the early 1960s to late 1970s were the best and worst of times—a period of unprecedented economic growth and deepening political oppression. Carter J. Eckert finds the roots of this dramatic socioeconomic transformation in the country’s long history of militarization, personified in South Korea’s paramount leader, Park Chung Hee.

Korean Religions in RelationKorean Religions in Relation



Jahyun Kim Haboush, Epistolary Korea: Letters in the Communicative Space of the Chosón, 1392–1910 (New York: Columbia University Press, 2009), 364; ...

Author: Anselm K. Min

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9781438462776

Category:

Page: 336

View: 519

Examines Buddhism, Confucianism, and Christianity in Korea, focusing on their mutual accommodation, exclusion, conflict, and assimilation. Instead of simply being another survey of the three dominant religions in contemporary Korea—Buddhism, Confucianism, and Christianity—this unique book studies them in relation to each other in terms of assimilation, accommodation, conflict, and exclusion. The contributors focus on major issues that have historically challenged the relations between the three religions from the Goryeo period to the present and how each religion has responded to them. The essays bring a new perspective to the study of Korean religions, one that is especially pertinent in the current age of religious pluralism with all its tensions.

Matters of EngagementMatters of Engagement



The Epistolary Genre and the Scriptural Economy of the Choson.” In Epistolary Korea: Letters in the Communicative Space of the Choson, 1392–1910, ...

Author: Daniela Hacke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429949647

Category:

Page: 340

View: 472

By drawing on a broad range of disciplinary and cross-disciplinary expertise, this study addresses the history of emotions in relation to cross-cultural movement, exchange, contact, and changing connections in the later medieval and early modern periods. All essays in this volume focus on the performance and negotiation of identity in situations of cultural contact, with particular emphasis on emotional practices. They cover a wide range of thematic and disciplinary areas and are organized around the primary sources on which they are based. The edited volume brings together two major areas in contemporary humanities: the study of how emotions were understood, expressed, and performed in shaping premodern transcultural relations, and the study of premodern cultural movements, contacts, exchanges, and understandings as emotionally charged encounters. In discussing these hitherto separated historiographies together, this study sheds new light on the role of emotions within Europe and amongst non-Europeans and Europeans between 1100 and 1800. The discussion of emotions in a wide range of sources including letters, images, material culture, travel writing, and literary accounts makes Matters of Engagement an invaluable source for both scholars and students concerned with the history of premodern emotions.

Gender Politics at Home and AbroadGender Politics at Home and Abroad



Epistolary Korea: Letters in the Communicative Space of the Chosón, 1392–1910. New York: Columbia University Press, 2009. “Filial Emotions and Filial ...

Author: Hyaeweol Choi

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108487436

Category:

Page: 320

View: 720

Choi examines how global Christian networks facilitated the flow of ideas, people and material culture, shaping gendered modernity in Korea.

The Power of the BrushThe Power of the Brush



Prologue: A Story of Letter Writing in Twenty-First-Century Korea -- Letter Writing in Korean Written Culture -- The Rise and Fall of a Spatial Genre -- Letters in Korean Neo-Confucian Tradition -- Epistolary Practices and Textual Culture ...

Author: Hwisang Cho

Publisher: Korean Studies of the Henry M.

ISBN: 0295747811

Category:

Page: 280

View: 391

"Focusing on the ways written culture interacts with philosophical, social, and political changes, The Power of the Brush examines the social effects of an "epistolary revolution" in sixteenth-century Korea and adds a Korean perspective to the evolving international discourse on the materiality of texts. It demonstrates how innovative uses of letters and the appropriation of letter-writing practices empowered cultural, social, and political minority groups: Confucians who did not have access to the advanced scholarship of China; women using vernacular Korean script, who were excluded from the male-dominated literary culture, which used Chinese script; and provincial literati, who were marginalized from court politics. The physical peculiarities of new letter forms such as spiral letters, the cooptation of letters for purposes other than communication, and the rise of diverse political epistolary genres combined to form a revolution in letter writing that challenged traditional values and institutions. New modes of reading and writing that were developed in letter writing precipitated changes in scholarly methodology, social interactions, and political mobilization. Even today, remnants of these traditional epistolary practices endure in media and political culture, reverberating in new communications technologies"--

Honour Violence and Emotions in HistoryHonour Violence and Emotions in History



Madam Kim left four writings in Korean script: one testament, ... 'Daughters' Letters of Farewell to Their Fathers', in Epistolary Korea: Letters in the ...

Author: Carolyn Strange

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9781472519481

Category:

Page: 208

View: 312

Honour, Violence and Emotions in History is the first book to draw on emerging cross-disciplinary scholarship on the study of emotions to analyse the history of honour and violence across a broad range of cultures and regions. Written by leading cultural and social historians from around the world, the book considers how emotions - particularly shame, anger, disgust, jealousy, despair and fear - have been provoked and expressed through culturally-embedded and historically specific understandings of honour. The collection explores a range of contexts, from 17th-century China to 18th-century South Africa and 20th-century Europe, offering a broad and wide-ranging analysis of the interrelationships between honour, violence and emotions in history. This ground-breaking book will be of interest to all researchers studying the relationship between violence and the emotions.

DynastiesDynasties



Haboush, JaHyun Kim, The Confucian Kingship in Korea: Yongjo and the Politics of Sagacity (New York, 1988). Haboush, JaHyun Kim, Epistolary Korea: Letters ...

Author: Jeroen Duindam

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781316432204

Category:

Page:

View: 472

For thousands of years, societies have fallen under the reign of a single leader, ruling as chief, king, or emperor. In this fascinating global history of medieval and early modern dynastic power, Jeroen Duindam charts the rise and fall of dynasties, the rituals of rulership, and the contested presence of women on the throne. From European, African, Mughal, Ming-Qing and Safavid dynasties to the Ottoman Empire, Tokugawa Japan and Chosŏn Korea, he reveals the tension between the ideals of kingship and the lives of actual rulers, the rich variety of arrangements for succession, the households or courts which catered to rulers' daily needs, and the relationship between the court and the territories under its control. The book integrates numerous African examples, sets dynasties within longer-term developments such as the rise of the state, and examines whether the tensions inherent in dynastic power led inexorably to cycles of ascent and decline.

Early Modern China and Northeast AsiaEarly Modern China and Northeast Asia



... 1625.114 The Korean missive was accompanied by a memorial from Yuan Keli, ... decree has been translated into English by Haboush, Epistolary Korea, pp.

Author: Evelyn S. Rawski

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107093089

Category:

Page: 349

View: 761

Evelyn Rawski presents a revisionist history of early modern China in the context of northeast Asian geopolitics and global maritime trade.

Signed Sealed DeliveredSigned Sealed Delivered



Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following for translations and excerpts used herein: Epistolary Korea: Letters in the Communicative Space of the ...

Author: Nina Sankovitch

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781451687170

Category:

Page: 224

View: 593

The author of the much-admired Tolstoy and the Purple Chair goes on a quest through the history of letters and her own personal correspondence to discover and celebrate what is special about the handwritten letter. Hailed as witty, moving, enlightening, and inspiring, Signed, Sealed, Delivered begins with Nina Sankovitch’s discovery of a trove of hundred year-old letters. The letters are in an old steamer trunk she finds in her backyard and include missives written by a Princeton freshman to his mother in the early 1900s. Nina’s own son is heading off to Harvard, and she hopes that he will write to her, as the Princeton student wrote to his mother and as Nina wrote to hers. But times have changed. Before Nina can persuade her child of the value of letters, she must first understand for herself exactly what it is about letters that make them so significant—and just why she wants to receive letters from her son. Sankovitch sets off on a quest through the history of letter writing—from the ancient Egyptians to the medieval lovers Abelard and Heloise, from the letters received by President Lincoln after his son’s death to the correspondence of Edith Wharton and Henry James. Sankovitch uncovers and defines the specific qualities that make letters so special, examining not only historical letters but also the letters in epistolary novels, her husband’s love letters, and dozens more sources, including her son’s brief reports from college on the weather and his allowance. In this beautifully written book, Nina Sankovitch reminds us that letters offer proof and legacy of what is most important in life: love and connection. In the end, she finds, the letters we write are even more important than the ones we wait for.

Art of the Korean Renaissance 1400 1600Art of the Korean Renaissance 1400 1600



In Epistolary Korea : Letters in the Communicative Space of the Chosón , 1392–1910 , edited by Ja Hyun Kim Haboush , pp . 269–76 .

Author: Soyoung Lee

Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art New York

ISBN: UOM:39015080695011

Category:

Page: 128

View: 380

This notable catalogue--the first English-language publication on the subject--highlights the art of the early period (1392-1592) of Korea's revolutionary Joseon dynasty. The Joseon rulers replaced the Buddhist establishment and re-created a Korean society informed on every level by Neo-Confucian ideals. They supported the production of innovative secular art inspired by past traditions, both native and from the broader Confucian world. Yet despite official policies, court-sponsored Buddhist art endured, contributing to the rich complexity of the early Joseon culture. The exquisite paintings, porcelain and other ceramics, metalware, and lacquerware featured in the book are drawn from the holdings of major Korean and Japanese museums, the collection of the Metropolitan Museum and other U.S. collections; and private collections. Many of the works have never been seen in the United States.

Routledge Handbook of Modern Korean HistoryRoutledge Handbook of Modern Korean History



Oh, S. (2009) 'Letters to the Editor: Women, Newspapers, and the Public Sphere in Turn-of-the-Twentieth Century Korea' in J. Haboush (ed.) Epistolary ...

Author: Michael J Seth

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317811480

Category:

Page: 396

View: 188

Beginning in the mid-nineteenth century when Korea became entangled in the world of modern imperialism and the old social, economic and political order began to change; this handbook brings together cutting edge scholarship on major themes in Korean History. Contributions by experts in the field cover the Late Choson and Colonial periods, Korea’s partition and the diverging paths of North and South Korea. Topics covered include: The division of Korea Religion Competing imperialisms Economic change War and rebellions Nationalism Gender North Korea Under Kim Jong Il Global Korea The Handbook provides a stimulating introduction to the most important themes within the subject area, and is an invaluable reference work for any student and researcher of Korean History.

Urban Modernity in Colonial Korea and TaiwanUrban Modernity in Colonial Korea and Taiwan



First, the story is told from the third-person perspective but interrupted by epistolary passages. These letters, while well-integrated into the narrative, ...

Author: Jina E. Kim

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004401167

Category:

Page: 220

View: 364

"Urban Modernities reconsiders Japanese colonialism in Korea and Taiwan through a relational study of modernist literature and urban aesthetics from the late colonial period. By charting intra-Asian and transregional circulations of writers, ideas, and texts, it reevaluates the dominant narrative in current scholarship that presents Korea and Taiwan as having vastly different responses to and experiences of Japanese colonialism. By comparing representations of various colonial spaces ranging from the nation, the streets, department stores, and print spaces to underscore the shared experiences of the quotidian and the poetic, Jina E. Kim shows how the culture of urban modernity enlivened networks of connections between the colonies and destabilized the metropole-colony relationship, thus also contributing to the broader formation of global modernism"--