Economics in Persian Period Biblical TextsEconomics in Persian Period Biblical Texts



How do the biblical texts of the time respond to such developments?

Author: Peter Altmann

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 3161548132

Category:

Page: 354

View: 174

Large-scale economic change such as the rise of coinage occurred during the Persian-dominated centuries (6th-4th centuries BCE) in the Eastern Mediterranean and ancient Near East. How do the biblical texts of the time respond to such developments? In this study, Peter Altmann lays out foundational economic conceptions from the ancient Near East and earlier biblical traditions in order to show how Persian-period biblical texts build on these traditions to address the challenges of their day. Economic issues are central for how Ezra and Nehemiah approach the topics of temple building and of Judean self-understanding, and economics are also important for other Persian-period texts. Following significant interaction with the material culture and extra-biblical texts, the author devotes special attention to the ascendancy of economics and its theological and identity implications as structuring metaphors for divine action and human community in the Persian period.

From Judah to JudaeaFrom Judah to Judaea



The papers collected in this volume were presented at an international conference held at International Christian University (ICU) in Tokyo, February 17-19, 2011, a testimony to the fruitfulness of this unusual Asian-Israeli scholarly ...

Author: Johannes Un-Sok Ro

Publisher: Sheffield Phoenix Press Limited

ISBN: UCSD:31822044218576

Category:

Page: 216

View: 376

It has long been recognized that the Persian period is crucial to the history of the formation of the biblical corpora. The essays presented in this volume explore this critically important era, reconstructing the socio-economic shifts that took place as well as the religio-theological environment of the Judean community and its neighbours. The topics of this volume, sociological, archaeological and theological, include: ethnicities and administration in Persian-era Palestine (Yigal); the historical origin of the concept of the piety of the poor at Qumran (Ro); the development of the theological concept of Yhwh's punitive justice (Ro); social, cultural and demographic transformations in Persian-period Judah (Faust); changes in Judah and its neighbouring provinces in the fourth century BCE (Fantalkin and Tal); some Greek views of the Persian empire (Sano). The papers collected in this volume were presented at an international conference held at International Christian University (ICU) in Tokyo, February 17-19, 2011, a testimony to the fruitfulness of this unusual Asian-Israeli scholarly dialogue.

The Oxford Handbook of the Historical Books of the Hebrew BibleThe Oxford Handbook of the Historical Books of the Hebrew Bible



Economics in Persian - Period Biblical Texts : Their Interactions with Economic Developments in the Persian Period and Earlier Biblical Traditions .

Author: Brad E. Kelle

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780190261160

Category:

Page: 616

View: 573

"The Oxford Handbook of the Historical Books of the Hebrew Bible offers 36 essays on the so-called "Historical Books": Joshua, Judges, 1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, Ezra-Nehemiah, and 1-2 Chronicles. The essays are organized around four nodes: contexts, content, approaches, and reception. Each essay takes up two questions: (1) what does the topic/area/issue have to do with the Historical Books?" and (2) how does this topic/area/issue help readers better interpret the Historical Books?" The essays engage traditional theories and newer updates to the same, and also engage the textual traditions themselves which are what give rise to compositional analyses. Many essays model approaches that move in entirely different ways altogether, however, whether those are by attending to synchronic, literary, theoretical, or reception aspects of the texts at hand. The contributions range from text-critical issues to ancient historiography, state formation and development, ancient Near Eastern contexts, society and economy, political theory, violence studies, orality, feminism, postcolonialism, and trauma theory-among others. Taken together, these essays well represent the variety of options available when it comes to gathering, assessing, and interpreting these particular biblical books"--

The Social History of Achaemenid PhoeniciaThe Social History of Achaemenid Phoenicia



Even though the Persian period has attracted a fair share of scholarly interest in recent years, as yet no concerted effort has been attempted to construct a comprehensive social history of Phoenician city-states as an integral part of the ...

Author: Vadim S. Jigoulov

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134938162

Category:

Page: 286

View: 892

Even though the Persian period has attracted a fair share of scholarly interest in recent years, as yet no concerted effort has been attempted to construct a comprehensive social history of Phoenician city-states as an integral part of the Achaemenid empire. This monograph explores the evidence from Persian-period literary (both ancient Jewish and classical), epigraphic, and numismatic sources, as well as material culture remains, in order to sketch just such a history. This study examines developments in Persian-period Phoenician city-states on the three levels: that of the individual household, the city-state, and the administrative unit of the Persian empire. These three societal levels are analyzed within the contexts of economic competition between and among the Phoenician city-states, their burgeoning economic ties with the outside world, and their interaction with the Persian imperial influence in the Levant.

Centralizing the CultCentralizing the Cult



25 Peter Altmann, Economics in Persian-Period Biblical Texts: Their Interactions with Economic Developments in the Persian Period and Earlier Biblical ...

Author: Julia Rhyder

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 9783161576850

Category:

Page: 505

View: 423

Back cover: In this work, Julia Rhyder examines the Holiness legislation in Leviticus 17-26 and cultic centralization in the Persian period. Rather than presuming centralization as an established norm, Leviticus 17-26 forge a distinctive understanding of centralization around a central sanctuary, standardized ritual processes, and a hegemonic priesthood.

Land and TempleLand and Temple



For a critique of Weinberg's thesis, see Altmann, Economics in Persian-Period Biblical Texts: Their Interactions with Economic Developments in the Persian ...

Author: Benjamin D. Gordon

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110421026

Category:

Page: 298

View: 240

This exploration of the Judean priesthood’s role in agricultural cultivation demonstrates that the institutional reach of Second Temple Judaism (516 BCE–70 CE) went far beyond the confines of its houses of worship, while exposing an unfamiliar aspect of sacred place-making in the ancient Jewish experience. Temples of the ancient world regularly held assets in land, often naming a patron deity as landowner and affording the land sanctity protections. Such arrangements can provide essential background to the Hebrew Bible’s assertion that God is the owner of the land of Israel. They can also shed light on references in early Jewish literature to the sacred landholdings of the priesthood or the temple.

Biblical Economic EthicsBiblical Economic Ethics



Sacred Scripture's Teachings on Economic Life Albino Barrera ... and the dearth of archaeological artifacts.97 The Persian period marked the low point of ...

Author: Albino Barrera

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739182307

Category:

Page: 378

View: 108

Written in non-technical language accessible to non-specialist readers, this book is a theological synthesis of the findings of scripture scholars and ethicists on what the Bible teaches about economic life. It proposes a biblical theology of economic life that addresses three questions, namely: What do the individual books of Sacred Scripture say about proper economic conduct? How do these teachings fit within the larger theology and ethics of the books in which they are found? Are there recurring themes, underlying patterns, or issues running across these different sections of the Bible when read together as a single canon? The economic norms of the Old and New Testament exhibit both continuity and change. Despite their diverse social settings and theological visions, the books of the Bible nonetheless share recurring themes: care for the poor, generosity, wariness over the idolatry of wealth, the inseparability of genuine worship and upright moral conduct, and the acknowledgment of an underlying divine order in economic life. Contrary to most people’s first impression that the Bible offers merely random economic teachings without rhyme or reason, there is, in fact, a specific vision undergirding these scriptural norms. Moreover, far from being burdensome impositions of do’s and don’ts, this book finds that the Bible’s economic norms are, in fact, an invitation to participate in God’s providence. To this end, we have been granted a threefold benefaction—the gift of divine friendship, the gift of one another, and the gift of the earth. Thus, biblical economic ethics is best characterized as a chronicle of how God provides for humanity through people’s mutual solicitude and hard work. The economic ordinances, aphorisms, and admonitions of the Old and New Testament turn out to be an unmerited divine invitation to participate in God’s governance of the world. Our economic conduct provides us with a unique opportunity to shine forth in our creation in the image and likeness of God. Often extremely demanding, hard, and even fraught with temptations and distractions, economic life nevertheless is, at its core, an occasion for humans to grow in holiness, charity, and perfection.

The Oxford Handbook of the Minor ProphetsThe Oxford Handbook of the Minor Prophets



Economics in Persian-Period Biblical Texts. FAT 109. Tübingen, Germany: Mohr Siebeck. Andrén, Daniela, Andrew E. Clark, Conchita D'Ambrosio, Sune Karlsson, ...

Author: Julia M. O'Brien

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190673222

Category:

Page: 640

View: 877

The Oxford Handbook of the Minor Prophets provides a clear and engaging one-volume guide to the major interpretative questions currently engaging scholars of the twelve Minor Prophets by collecting 40 essays by both established and emerging scholars who explore a wide range of methodological perspectives. Divided into four sections, the first group of essays is devoted to historical studies which consider the manuscript evidence for these books and overview debates about how, when, and by whom they were composed. Essays dealing with literary explorations consider the genres and rhetorical style of the material, key themes, and intertextual connections with other sections of the Jewish and Christian canons. A large section on the history of interpretation traces the ways in which past and present confessional communities, scholars, and artists have understood the Minor Prophets. In the final section, essays on individual books of the twelve Minor Prophets explore the structure, themes, and contested issues of each book.

Class and Power in Roman PalestineClass and Power in Roman Palestine



Economics in Persian-Period Biblical Texts: Their Interactions with Economic Developments in the Persian Period and Earlier Biblical Traditions.

Author: Anthony Keddie

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108493949

Category:

Page: 384

View: 774

Examines how socioeconomic relations between Judaean elites and non-elites changed as Palestine became part of the Roman Empire.

A Historical Theology of the Hebrew BibleA Historical Theology of the Hebrew Bible



Cf. also the references in Janowski, “Hans Walter Wolff und die ... Economics in Persian-period Biblical Texts: Their Interactions with Economic ...

Author: Konrad Schmid

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN: 9781467457095

Category:

Page: 456

View: 228

In this meticulously researched study, Konrad Schmid offers a historical clarification of the concept of “theology.” He then examines the theologies of the three constituent parts of the Hebrew Bible—the Torah, the Prophets, and the Writings— before tracing how these theological concepts developed throughout the history of ancient Israel and early Judaism. Schmid not only explores the theology of the biblical books in isolation, but he also offers unifying principles and links between the distinct units that make up the Hebrew Bible. By focusing on both the theology of the whole Hebrew Bible as well as its individual pieces, A Historical Theology of the Hebrew Bible provides a comprehensive discussion of theological work within the Hebrew Bible.

Poverty Law and Divine Justice in Persian and Hellenistic JudahPoverty Law and Divine Justice in Persian and Hellenistic Judah



A view of Persian and Hellenistic Judean communities through theological and socioeconomic lenses Johannes Unsok Ro employs philological, historical, and sociological approaches to investigate the close connections between socioeconomic ...

Author: Johannes Unsok Ro

Publisher: SBL Press

ISBN: 9780884142850

Category:

Page: 318

View: 204

A view of Persian and Hellenistic Judean communities through theological and socioeconomic lenses Johannes Unsok Ro employs philological, historical, and sociological approaches to investigate the close connections between socioeconomic structures, social inequality, and theological developments in the Judean communities in Persian- and Hellenistic-era Palestine. Ro contends that competing points of view from communities of lay returnees, priestly returnees, and communities of resident Judeans and Samaritans were juxtaposed within the Hebrew Bible, which took shape during the postexilic period. By exploring issues such as the relationship between the shaping of the canon and literacy in the Judean community, the term strangers in the biblical law codes, the socioeconomic structures of Judean communities reflected in the biblical law codes, the development of the theological concept of divine punitive justice, the piety of the poor in certain psalms, and the concept of poverty in the Dead Sea Scrolls, Ro illustrates that the communities behind each text and its redactions can be ascertained through sociological and theological lenses. Features Demonstration that a theology of the poor materialized orally among the poor but found written expression among Levites Insight into the socioeconomic and theological concerns of the authorial groups behind various biblical law codes A case that biblical “poverty” sometimes refers to humility and a theologically reflected consciousness of lowliness toward God

The Oxford Handbook of the Historical Books of the Hebrew BibleThe Oxford Handbook of the Historical Books of the Hebrew Bible



This volume also explores the specific themes, concepts, and content that are most essential for interpreting these books.

Author: Brad E. Kelle

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190074111

Category:

Page: 640

View: 931

The Oxford Handbook of Historical Books of the Hebrew Bible is a collection of essays that provide resources for the interpretation of the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Chronicles, Ezra, and Nehemiah. The volume is not exhaustive in its coverage, but examines interpretive aspects of these books that are deemed essential for interpretation or that are representative of significant trends in present and future scholarship. The individual essays are united by their focus on two guiding questions: (1) What does this topic have to do with the Old Testament Historical Books? and (2) How does this topic help readers better interpret the Old Testament Historical Books? Each essay critically surveys prior scholarship before presenting current and prospective approaches. Taking into account the ongoing debates concerning the relationship between the Old Testament texts and historical events in the ancient world, data from Assyrian, Babylonian, and Persian culture and history are used to provide a larger context for the content of the Historical Books. Essays consider specific issues related to Israelite/Judean history (settlement, state formation, monarchy, forced migration, and return) as they relate to the interpretation of the Historical Books. This volume also explores the specific themes, concepts, and content that are most essential for interpreting these books. In light of the diverse material included in this section of the Old Testament, the Handbook further examines interpretive strategies that employ various redactional, synthetic, and theory-based approaches. Beyond the Old Testament proper, subsequent texts, traditions, and cultures often received and interpreted the material in the Historical Books, and so the volume concludes by investigating the literary, social, and theological aspects of that reception.

The New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocryphal Deuterocanonical BooksThe New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocryphal Deuterocanonical Books



The presence of two indisputable Persian loan words (“parks” in 2.5 ... As in any era of tremendous economic innovation, the Persian period brought ...

Author: Michael David Coogan

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195288803

Category:

Page: 2398

View: 507

Presents the complete text of the New Revised Standard Version Bible, with the Aprocryphal/Deuterocanonical books; and features annotations in a single column across the page bottom, in-text background essays on the major divisions of the biblical text, and other reference tools.

The Economy of Ancient Judah in Its Historical ContextThe Economy of Ancient Judah in Its Historical Context



The essays in this volume address this gap from a multidisciplinary perspective, involving archeology, biblical studies, economics, epigraphy, ancient history, Jewish studies, and theology.

Author: Marvin Lloyd Miller

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9781575064147

Category:

Page: 288

View: 138

The dynamics of ancient Judah’s economy are among the most important, but also neglected and least understood, aspects of ancient Israel’s history. The essays in this volume address this gap from a multidisciplinary perspective, involving archeology, biblical studies, economics, epigraphy, ancient history, Jewish studies, and theology. The essays focus on particular issues in the economy of ancient Judah and its neighbors during the late monarchy and the Neo-Babylonian, Persian, and Hellenistic periods. Some of them evaluate the theoretical models used to understand the inner workings of ancient agrarian economies, while others explore rural economies, the forces of regeneration and degeneration in particular regions, the settlement histories of different areas, and the exploitation of depopulated land in Judah and Idumea. Essays in the volume also address population growth, urbanization, the role of diverse temple towns (such as Babylon and Jerusalem) in regional market economies, the literary portrayal of patron–client relationships, symmetrical and asymmetrical relations in international trade, and the views of urban elites toward agrarian economic developments. Yet others discuss family economics—policies of reproduction, gender roles, family size, and household hierarchies—in Judah and ancient Persia. Many of the essays appearing in this volume were originally delivered as papers in special sessions devoted to these topics at annual meetings of the Canadian Society of Biblical Studies and the European Association of Biblical Studies. The scholars participating in this international project conduct their research at institutions in Canada, Germany, Israel, Norway, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United States.

A Theocratic Yehud A Theocratic Yehud



Since many scholars appear to depend upon a theocratic "structure" or "spirit" at some point in their discussions of Persian-period Yehud, one would usualy expect to find a clear definition of theocracy.

Author: Jeremiah W. Cataldo

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9780567542236

Category:

Page: 240

View: 658

Among the variety of social-political reconstructions of Persian-period Yehud, one "consensus" stands out - one which states that the Jerusalem priesthood enjoyed a prominent level of authority, symbolized in the Jerusalem temple. Unfortunately, this leads easily into conclusions of a theocracy in Yehud. The problem, in part, is due to the immediate association of priests assumed to be authoritative with that of a theocratic governing structure. To address this problem, at least three aspects of Yehud's governing structure(s) require further attention: (1) the social implications of a particular governing structure within a society; (2) the developments of a society leading up to that governing structure; and (3) a clearly articulated definition of the term and concept of theocracy. Since many scholars appear to depend upon a theocratic "structure" or "spirit" at some point in their discussions of Persian-period Yehud, one would usualy expect to find a clear definition of theocracy. Instead, a hasty and ill-equipped definition that seems to avoid addressing the social and political complexities is often used. The conclusion is that no power or political vacuum appears to have existed allowing the priesthood to claim power in Yehud. The Persian empire did not allow territories to develop autonomous governing structures (Chapter 2). The social, economic, and political realms of Yehud functioned within the framework of Persian imperial administration (Chapter 3). And the term theocracy, when defined according to social-scientific requirements (Chapter 4), does not accurately describe the social-political context of Yehud during the Persian period (Chapter 5).

A History of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period vol 1 A History of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period vol 1



This first volume, Yehud: A History of the Persian Province of Judah offers the most up to date and comprehensive examination of the political and administrative structures; the society and economy; the religion, temple and cult; the ...

Author: Lester L. Grabbe

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780567216175

Category:

Page: 494

View: 415

In the first of four volumes on A History of the Jews and Judaism in the Second Temple Period, Lester Grabbe presents a comprehensive history of Yehud - the Aramaic name for Judah - during the Persian Period. Among the many crucial questions he addresses are: What are the sources for this period and how do we evaluate them? And how do we make them 'speak' to us through the fog of centuries? This first volume, Yehud: A History of the Persian Province of Judah offers the most up to date and comprehensive examination of the political and administrative structures; the society and economy; the religion, temple and cult; the developments in thought and literature; and the major political events of Judah at the time.

End of History and the Last KingEnd of History and the Last King



... Economics in Persian-Period Biblical Texts: Their Interactions with Economic Developments in the Persian Period and Earlier Biblical Traditions, ...

Author: David Janzen

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9780567698025

Category:

Page: 288

View: 428

This book examines community identity in the post-exilic temple community in Ezra-Nehemiah, and explores the possible influences that the Achaemenids, the ruling Persian dynasty, might have had on its construction. In the book, David Janzen reads Ezra-Nehemiah in dialogue with the Achaemenids' Old Persian inscriptions, as well as with other media the dynasty used, such as reliefs, seals, coins, architecture, and imperial parks. In addition, he discusses the cultural and religious background of Achaemenid thought, especially its intersections with Zoroastrian beliefs. Ezra-Nehemiah, Janzen argues, accepts Achaemenid claims for the necessity and beneficence of their hegemony. The result is that Ezra-Nehemiah, like the imperial ideology it mimics, claims that divine and royal wills are entirely aligned. Ezra-Nehemiah reflects the Achaemenid assertion that the peoples they have colonized are incapable of living in peace and happiness without the Persian rule that God established to benefit humanity, and that the dynasty rewards the peoples who do what they desire, since that reflects divine desire. The final chapter of the book argues that Ezra-Nehemiah was produced by an elite group within the Persian-period temple assembly, and shows that Ezra-Nehemiah's pro-Achaemenid worldview was not widely accepted within that community.

From Enoch to TobitFrom Enoch to Tobit



ISBN 978-3-16-154905-2 cloth Peter Altmann Economics in Persian - Period Biblical Texts Their Interactions with Economic Developments in the Persian Period ...

Author: Devorah Dimant

Publisher: Mohr Siebeck

ISBN: 3161542886

Category:

Page: 383

View: 593

Publisher's description: The volume assembles twenty previously published studies by Devorah Dimant, which have been re-edited, updated, and furnished with an introductory essay written especially for this collection. The studies survey and analyze Jewish works composed in Hebrew, Aramaic or Greek during the Second Temple period, and discuss their contents, ideas, and connections to the Dead Sea Scrolls. Particular attention is paid to central issues, such as the apocalyptic worldview and literature and its relationship to the Dead Sea Scrolls. Among others, specific themes related to the Aramaic Tobit and 1 Enoch are analyzed as well as the links detected between the Hebrew Qumran writings Pseudo-Ezekiel and the Apocryphon of Jeremiah and the later apocalyptic works 4 Ezra and 2 Baruch. The introductory essay provides a general framework and pertinent terminology for discussing the literature in question. Together these essays offer a broad and fresh perspective of the Jewish literary scene in antiquity, with special attention to the one nurtured in the land of Israel.