Dances of SwedenDances of Sweden



The author of this book, Dr. Erik Salven, has played no small part in the revival of Swedish folk dancing.

Author: Erik Salven

Publisher: Noverre Press

ISBN: 1914311043

Category:

Page: 42

View: 678

The lakes and pine forests of Sweden are a natural setting for peasant arts and crafts, and these, particularly the Swedish folk dances, are justly famous wherever such things are loved and appreciated. There is something for everyone in these dances: in Gubbdunder, the Old Men's Dance, the younger folk have to leave the floor to their elders, but they come into their own again with a remarkable display of athletic virtuosity in Huppleken, the Jumping Game. The author of this book, Dr. Erik Salven, has played no small part in the revival of Swedish folk dancing. As Director of the Halland Museum, Halmstad, and a member of the International Folk Music Council, he writes with authority on the traditional Swedish dances and folk songs. His introductory essay on the various dances, music and costumes can be read with interest even by those who cannot tell a Hambo from a Minuet. Selected dances are more fully described, with step notation, music and diagrams, and the correct costume for each one is shown in all its gay colours.

Swedish Folk DancesSwedish Folk Dances



About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Author: Nils William Berquist

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN: 1330432665

Category:

Page: 71

View: 376

Excerpt from Swedish Folk Dances It is significant that the folk dance has come to fill a large place in the life of the people of the city. Country men and women coming to the town have left behind them the dances that have formed part of their lives and much of their pleasure, because city conditions were different and country traits unbecoming. Our own country dances "The Lady of the Lake," "Hi! Jim Along," and even the "Virginia Reel" have not survived a separation from their birthplaces. Foreign people coming to our cities form closer groups, and during times of festivity the emotions arising from old associations seek expression in the old dances. The old rhythms of folk dances are common to all human life. Many generations of city-dwelling cannot do more than cover thinly the innate tendencies to dance the old forefather dances of the sod, mountain, or steppe. It needs but the music and festal occasion to fling off newly acquired restrictions which overlie the pure rustic humanity of man. Thus the folk dance has come to signify the revival of the expression of old fundamental rural impulses, pure and lovely as the sunshine of the fields. The general European revival and our own use of the folk dance is an expression of this deep-rooted longing. In New York City dancing has taken its legitimate place in the education and recreation of the children in the schools. There the dances have lightened the formal gymnastics with a natural interest, and have returned large values in a normal joyous expression of fundamental impulses. So few city recreations are not manufactured that the genuine is rare and is to be valued accordingly. This volume of folk dances taken from Swedish sources and sympathetically translated for American use by Mr. Bergquist is genuine and cannot fail to receive the large appreciation it deserves, for he has danced them as his forefathers did in Sweden itself. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.