Cinema and Soviet SocietyCinema and Soviet Society



The story of Soviet film over the period covered by Peter Kenez is central to the history of World Cinema.

Author: Peter Kenez

Publisher: I.B. Tauris

ISBN: 1860646328

Category:

Page: 264

View: 632

The story of Soviet film over the period covered by Peter Kenez is central to the history of World Cinema. In this revised, updated paperback edition of his classic text, Peter Kenez explores the roots of Soviet cinema in the film heritage of pre-Revolutionary Russia, tracing the changes in content, style, technical means and production capacities generated by the Revolution of 1917; the constraints on form and subject imposed from the 1930s in the name of Socialist Realism; the relative freedom of expression accorded to film-makers during World War Two; and the extraordinary repression during the final years of Stalin era. Based on original research both in the former Soviet Union and elsewhere in the primary sources of Eastern Europe, this is the essential student text on the period which produced the major films of such 'greats' as Eisenstein, Vertov, Kuleshov, Pudovkin and many more.

Cinema and Soviet Society 1917 1953Cinema and Soviet Society 1917 1953



The political influences on Soviet cinema are traced from its pre-revolutionary heritage, through the Revolution and the golden years of the late 1920s through Second World War liberalization and the extraordinary repression of Stalin final ...

Author: Peter Kenez

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 0521428637

Category:

Page: 281

View: 748

The political influences on Soviet cinema are traced from its pre-revolutionary heritage, through the Revolution and the golden years of the late 1920s through Second World War liberalization and the extraordinary repression of Stalin final years.The political influences on Soviet cinema are traced from its pre-revolutionary heritage, through the Revolution and the golden years of the late 1920s through Second World War liberalization and the extraordinary repression of Stalin final years.

Movies for the MassesMovies for the Masses



A pathbreaking study of Soviet cinema in the 1920s.

Author: Denise J. Youngblood

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521466326

Category:

Page: 296

View: 173

This book presents a pathbreaking study of Soviet popular cinema in the 1920s. Professor Youngblood focuses on commercial directors, acting genres, box office hits and audience responses to these films and their stars. She also examines the role of foreign films and the governmental and industrial circumstances underlying filmmaking practices of the era. The author demonstrates that during the first decade after the revolution, Soviet cinema was dominated by "bourgeois" directors and middle class tastes and was greatly influenced by Western and pre-revolutionary film cultures.

Stalinism and Soviet CinemaStalinism and Soviet Cinema



The collection provides comprehensive coverage of the antecedents, role and consequences of Stalinism and Soviet cinema, how Stalinism emerged, what the relationship was between the political leadership, the cinema administrators, the film ...

Author: Derek Spring

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136128288

Category:

Page: 296

View: 204

Stalinism and Soviet Cinema marks the first attempt to confront systematically the role and influence of Stalin and Stalinism in the history and development of Soviet cinema. The collection provides comprehensive coverage of the antecedents, role and consequences of Stalinism and Soviet cinema, how Stalinism emerged, what the relationship was between the political leadership, the cinema administrators, the film-makers and their films and audiences, and how Soviet cinema is coming to terms with the disintegration of established structures and mythologies. Contributors from Britain, America and the Soviet Union address themselves to the importance of the Stalinist legacy, not only to the history of Soviet cinema but to Soviet history as a whole.

A History of the Soviet Union from the Beginning to the EndA History of the Soviet Union from the Beginning to the End



In this second edition, he also examines the post-Soviet period, tracing Russia's development up to the time of publication.

Author: Peter Kenez

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139451024

Category:

Page:

View: 557

An examination of political, social and cultural developments in the Soviet Union. The book identifies the social tensions and political inconsistencies that spurred radical change in the government of Russia, from the turn of the century to the revolution of 1917. Kenez envisions that revolution as a crisis of authority that posed the question, 'Who shall govern Russia?' This question was resolved with the creation of the Soviet Union. Kenez traces the development of the Soviet Union from the Revolution, through the 1920s, the years of the New Economic Policies and into the Stalinist order. He shows how post-Stalin Soviet leaders struggled to find ways to rule the country without using Stalin's methods but also without openly repudiating the past, and to negotiate a peaceful but antipathetic coexistence with the capitalist West. In this second edition, he also examines the post-Soviet period, tracing Russia's development up to the time of publication.

The Cinema of Russia and the Former Soviet UnionThe Cinema of Russia and the Former Soviet Union



This volume explores the cinema of the former Soviet Union and contemporary Russia, ranging from the pre-Revolution-ary period to the present day.

Author: Birgit Beumers (ed)

Publisher:

ISBN: 1904764983

Category:

Page: 283

View: 720

This volume explores the cinema of the former Soviet Union and contemporary Russia, ranging from the pre-Revolution-ary period to the present day. It offers an insight into the development of Soviet film, from 'the most important of all arts' as a propaganda tool to a means of entertainment in the Stalin era, from the rise of its 'dissident' art-house cinema in the 1960s through the glasnost era with its broken taboos to recent Russian blockbusters. Films have been chosen to represent both the classics of Russian and Soviet cinema as well as those films that had a more localised success and remain to date part of Russia's cultural reference system. The volume also covers a range of national film industries of the former Soviet Union in chapters on the greatest films and directors of Ukrainian, Kazakh, Georgian and Armenian cinematography. Films discussed include Strike (1925), Earth (1930), Ivan's Childhood (1962), Mother and Son (1997) and Brother (1997).

The Red ScreenThe Red Screen



An original collection of essays by leading international Soviet cinema scholars, covering seventy years of cinema history, providing a clear understanding of the aesthetic developments and sociopolitical function of Soviet cinema.

Author: Anna Lawton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134899265

Category:

Page: 356

View: 745

First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Cinema State Socialism and Society in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe 1917 1989Cinema State Socialism and Society in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe 1917 1989



This book presents a comprehensive re-examination of the cinemas of the Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe during the communist era.

Author: Sanja Bahun

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317818717

Category:

Page: 216

View: 957

This book presents a comprehensive re-examination of the cinemas of the Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe during the communist era. It argues that, since the end of communism in these countries, film scholars are able to view these cinemas in a different way, no longer bound by an outlook relying on binary Cold War terms. With the opening of archives in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, much more is known about these states and societies; at the same time, the field has been reinvigorated by its opening up to more contemporary concepts, themes and approaches in film studies and adjacent disciplines. Taking stock of these developments, this book presents a rich, varied tapestry, relating specific films to specific national and transnational circumstances, rather than viewing them as a single, monolithic "Cold War Communist" cinema.

New Soviet ManNew Soviet Man



This is the first full-length study of masculinity in Stalinist Soviet cinema.

Author: John Haynes

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 0719062381

Category:

Page: 207

View: 106

This is the first full-length study of masculinity in Stalinist Soviet cinema. A detailed analysis of Stalinist discourse examines the imagined relationship between the patriarch Stalin and his "model sons" in the key genre cycles of the era: from the capital to the collective farms, and ultimately to the very borders of the Soviet state. Informed by contemporary and present day debates over the social and cultural significance of cinema and masculinity, this book draws on a range of theoretical and comparative material to produce engaging and accessible readings accounting for both the appeal of--and the inherent potential for subversion within--films produced by the Stalinist culture industry.

Russian CinemaRussian Cinema



Russian Cinema provides a lively and informative exploration of the film genres that developed during Russia's tumultuous history, with discussion of the work of Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Mikhalkov, Paradzhanov, Sokurov and others.

Author: David C. Gillespie

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317874133

Category:

Page: 212

View: 590

Russian Cinema provides a lively and informative exploration of the film genres that developed during Russia's tumultuous history, with discussion of the work of Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Mikhalkov, Paradzhanov, Sokurov and others. The background section assesses the contribution of visual art and music, especially the work of the composers Shostakovich and Prokofev, to Russian cinema. Subsequent chapters explore a variety of topics: The literary space - the cinematic rendering of the literary text, from 'Sovietized' versions to bolder and more innovative interpretations, as well as adaptations of foreign classics The Russian film comedy looks at this perennially popular genre over the decades, from the 'domestication' of laughter under Stalin to the emergence of satire The historical film - how history has been used in film to affirm prevailing ideological norms, from October to Taurus Women and Russian film discusses some of the female stars of the Soviet screen (Liubov Orlova, Vera Alentova, Liudmila Gurchenko), as well as films made by male and female directors, such as Askoldov and Kira Muratova Film and ideology shows why ideology was an essential component of Soviet films such as The Maxim Trilogy, and how it was later definitively rejected The Russian war film looks at Civil War and Second World War films, and the post-Soviet treatment of recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Chechnya Private life and public morality explores the evolution of melodramas about youth angst, town and village life, personal relationships, and the emergence of the dominant sub-genre of the 1990s, the gangster thriller Autobiography, memory and identity offers a close reading of the work of Andrei Tarkovskii, Russia's greatest post-war director, whose films, including Andrei Rublev and Mirror, place him among the foremost European auteur film-makers Russian Cinema offers a close analysis of over 300 films illustrated with representative stills throughout. As with other titles in the Inside Film series it includes comprehensive filmographies, a thorough bibliography and an annotated further reading list. The book is a jargon-free, accessible study that will be of interest to undergraduates of film studies, modern languages, Russian language and literature, as well as cineastes, film teachers and researchers.

The Zero HourThe Zero Hour



The book also emphasizes the evolving uses of comedy and satire and the incorporation of "genre film" techniques into a new popular cinema.

Author: Andrew Horton

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691227863

Category:

Page: 304

View: 305

Now faced with the "zero hour" created by a new freedom of expression and the dramatic breakup of the Soviet Union, Soviet cinema has recently become one of the most interesting in the world, aesthetically as well as politically. How have Soviet filmmakers responded to the challenges of glasnost? To answer this question, the American film scholar Andrew Horton and the Soviet critic Michael Brashinsky offer the first book-length study of the rapid changes in Soviet cinema that have been taking place since 1985. What emerges from their collaborative dialogue is not only a valuable work of film criticism but also a fascinating study of contemporary Soviet culture in general. Horton and Brashinsky examine a wide variety of films from BOMZH (initials standing for homeless drifter) through Taxi Blues and the glasnost blockbuster Little Vera to the Latvian documentary Is It Easy to Be Young? and the "new wave" productions of the "Wild Kazakh boys." The authors argue that the medium that once served the Party became a major catalyst for the deconstruction of socialism, especially through documentary filmmaking. Special attention is paid to how filmmakers from 1985 through 1990 represent the newly "discovered" past of the pre-glasnost era and how they depict troubled youth and conflicts over the role of women in society. The book also emphasizes the evolving uses of comedy and satire and the incorporation of "genre film" techniques into a new popular cinema. An intriguing discussion of films of Georgia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Kazakhstan ends the work.

Inside Soviet Film SatireInside Soviet Film Satire



Offering a general overview of the evolution of Soviet film satire during a seventy-year period, this volume also provides in-depth analyses of such classics as Kuleshov's The Extraordinary Adventures of Mr. West in the Land of the ...

Author: Andrew Horton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521021073

Category:

Page: 171

View: 160

Offering a general overview of the evolution of Soviet film satire during a seventy-year period, this volume also provides in-depth analyses of such classics as Kuleshov's The Extraordinary Adventures of Mr. West in the Land of the Bolsheviks; Volga, Volga, a popular musical of the Stalinist period; and the bitter and surrealistic Zero City, The Fountain, and Black Rose, Red Rose of the glasnost period. It also examines the effects of communism's collapse in 1991 on the tradition of satire and includes an interview with the renowned Soviet filmmaker Yuri Mamin.

Red Women on the Silver ScreenRed Women on the Silver Screen



This book looks at the interaction between these two phenomena: at the extent to which women's new status and roles were reflected and promoted on Soviet screens throughout the country's history.

Author: Maya Turovskaya

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: UOM:39015029866079

Category:

Page: 272

View: 716

The Soviet Union was the first country in the world to declare women equal to men. At the same time, cinema was emerging as the newest and most accessible form of popular entertainment, and as a powerful tool in propagandizing the Party line. This book looks at the interaction between these two phenomena: at the extent to which women's new status and roles were reflected and promoted on Soviet screens throughout the country's history. Part I, written by Lynne Attwood, provides an essential framework for readers unfamiliar with Soviet studies. It offers a lucid and lively account of the milestones in Soviet history, the importance of film within this history and the changing images and experiences of Soviet women within both cinema and society. In Parts II and III, women from the former Soviet Union - film critics, directors, camera-operators and script-writers - relate their own experiences in the film industry, and their responses to the images of women portrayed on screen. This crisply-written book, illustrated with evocative photographs from Soviet films, will provide readers with a real insight into the relationship between women and film in the Soviet Union.

Ruptures and Continuities in Soviet Russian CinemaRuptures and Continuities in Soviet Russian Cinema



This book, based on extensive original research, examines how far the collapse of the Soviet Union represented a threshold that initiated change or whether there are continuities which gradually reshaped cinema in the new Russia.

Author: Birgit Beumers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317194705

Category:

Page: 226

View: 987

This book, based on extensive original research, examines how far the collapse of the Soviet Union represented a threshold that initiated change or whether there are continuities which gradually reshaped cinema in the new Russia. The book considers a wide range of films and film-makers and explores their attitudes to genre, character and aesthetic style. The individual chapters demonstrate that, whereas genres shifted and characters developed, stylistic choices remained largely unaffected.

Leave Disco Dancer Alone Leave Disco Dancer Alone



In this important new book, Sudha Rajagopalan explores the consumption of Indian popular cinema in post-Stalinist Soviet society.

Author: Sudha Rajagopalan

Publisher:

ISBN: 8190618601

Category:

Page: 241

View: 832

In this important new book, Sudha Rajagopalan explores the consumption of Indian popular cinema in post-Stalinist Soviet society. In doing so, she highlights the enthusiastic response Indian popular films and their stars received from the Soviet audience, as well as the discursive and institutional context in which this consumption occurred from the mid-fifties till the end of the Soviet era in 1991.The death of Stalin in 1953 was followed by the introduction of important changes in government policy in the Soviet Union, including a relative liberalisation of leisure and culture which revealed the state s resurgent interest in addressing popular tastes. The renewed import and screening of foreign entertainment films in the Soviet Union was one of the most visible outcomes of this change. Drawing on oral history methodology and archival research in Russia, the author analyses the ways in which Soviet movie-goers, policy makers, critics and sociologists responded to, interpreted and debated Indian cinema in the Soviet Union between 1954 and the end of the eighties. Complemented by contemporary press and archival photos which capture the rapturous reception given to actors like Raj Kapoor, Nargis, Shashi Kapoor, Amitabh Bachchan and Mithun Chakraborty as well as Soviet film posters announcing films like Awara, Betaab and Chandni, this engaging book, which is also the first monograph on Indian cinema abroad among non-diasporic audiences, is a must-read not only for students and scholars of film history and cultural studies, but every such lay reader who has grown up on a regular diet of popular Indian cinema.