Cardus on CricketCardus on Cricket



Chosen and introduced by Sir Rupert Hart-Davis, Cardus on Cricket features a range of writings from 'Cricket', 'Days in the Sun', 'The Summer Game', 'Good Days', 'Australian Summer' and 'The Manchester Guardian'.

Author: Neville Cardus

Publisher: Souvenir Press

ISBN: 9780285641013

Category:

Page: 260

View: 588

Included are the imaginative reconstruction of the 1882 England and Australia test match to Cardus's descriptions of village cricket, accounts of the great players that Cardus watched play (from Donald Bradman and Harold Larwood to Wally Hammond) to examples of his 'Shastbury' writings. Chosen and introduced by Sir Rupert Hart-Davis, Cardus on Cricket features a range of writings from 'Cricket', 'Days in the Sun', 'The Summer Game', 'Good Days', 'Australian Summer' and 'The Manchester Guardian'.

Cricket Literature and CultureCricket Literature and Culture



Cardus's cricket writings have frequently been reprinted, anthologised and edited, and all recent english anthologies of cricket prose include at least one essay by him. Conversely, forms of literary criticism were a major constitutive ...

Author: Anthony Bateman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317158059

Category:

Page: 248

View: 525

In his important contribution to the growing field of sports literature, Anthony Bateman traces the relationship between literary representations of cricket and Anglo-British national identity from 1850 to the mid 1980s. Examining newspaper accounts, instructional books, fiction, poetry, and the work of editors, anthologists, and historians, Bateman elaborates the ways in which a long tradition of literary discourse produced cricket's cultural status and meaning. His critique of writing about cricket leads to the rediscovery of little-known texts and the reinterpretation of well-known works by authors as diverse as Neville Cardus, James Joyce, the Great War poets, and C.L.R. James. Beginning with mid-eighteenth century accounts of cricket that provide essential background, Bateman examines the literary evolution of cricket writing against the backdrop of key historical moments such as the Great War, the 1926 General Strike, and the rise of Communism. Several case studies show that cricket simultaneously asserted English ideals and created anxiety about imperialism, while cricket's distinctively colonial aesthetic is highlighted through Bateman's examination of the discourse surrounding colonial cricket tours and cricketers like Prince Kumar Shri Ranjitsinhji of India and Sir Learie Constantine of Trinidad. Featuring an extensive bibliography, Bateman's book shows that, while the discourse surrounding cricket was key to its status as a symbol of nation and empire, the embodied practice of the sport served to destabilise its established cultural meaning in the colonial and postcolonial contexts.

The Great RomanticThe Great Romantic



Between two world wars, he became the laureate of cricket by doing the same with words. In The Great Romantic, award-winning author Duncan Hamilton demonstrates how Cardus changed sports journalism for ever.

Author: Duncan Hamilton

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781473661820

Category:

Page: 384

View: 250

Neville Cardus described how one majestic stroke-maker 'made music' and 'spread beauty' with his bat. Between two world wars, he became the laureate of cricket by doing the same with words. In The Great Romantic, award-winning author Duncan Hamilton demonstrates how Cardus changed sports journalism for ever. While popularising cricket - while appealing, in Cardus' words to people who 'didn't know a leg-break from the pavilion cat at Lord's'- he became a star in his own right with exquisite phrase-making, disdain for statistics and a penchant for literary and musical allusions. Among those who venerated Cardus were PG Wodehouse, John Arlott, Harold Pinter, JB Priestley and Don Bradman. However, behind the rhapsody in blue skies, green grass and colourful characters, this richly evocative biography finds that Cardus' mother was a prostitute, he never knew his father and he received negligible education. Infatuations with younger women ran parallel to a decidedly unromantic marriage. And, astonishingly, the supreme stylist's aversion to factual accuracy led to his reporting on matches he never attended. Yet Cardus also belied his impoverished origins to prosper in a second class-conscious profession, becoming a music critic of international renown. The Great Romantic uncovers the dark enigma within a golden age.

Cricket and EnglandCricket and England



Brookes, C., English Cricket: The Game and its Players through the Ages (London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1978). Brookes, C., His Own Man: The Life of Neville Cardus (London: Methuen, 1985). Brown, I., The Heart of England (London: ...

Author: Mr Jack Williams

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136317132

Category:

Page: 248

View: 944

Looking at the inter-war period, this work explores the relationship between cricket and English social and cultural values.

AutobiographyAutobiography



' 'This is a very, very good book. Cricket and music - how he makes both these worlds pulsate, life comic as well as life magnificent.' Robert Lynd 'A superb work by a master of English.' Wilfred Pickles

Author: Neville Cardus

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 9780571286904

Category:

Page: 302

View: 163

Autobiography was first published in 1947 and was described by J. B. Priestley as 'one of the best pieces of writing that ever found a way to our Book Society. He is a writer who has learned how to write and the result is glorious.' Sir Neville Cardus is best remembered as a writer on both cricket and music and during his lifetime achieved an unparalleled reputation as one of England's greatest journalists on these two very different subjects. Born in Rusholme in Manchester Cardus carved out an international reputation for himself by his own ability, efforts and imagination and created, as his biographer Christopher Brookes put it, 'a beguiling personal legend in the course of a career which extended over fifty years.' 'This is a very, very good book. Cricket and music - how he makes both these worlds pulsate, life comic as well as life magnificent.' Robert Lynd 'A superb work by a master of English.' Wilfred Pickles

A Fourth Innings with CardusA Fourth Innings with Cardus



In this, another collection of classic cricket writing by Sir Neville Cardus, he urges that the game itself is more important than winning, players should fully express themselves in the game and he writes about those players who delight ...

Author: Neville Cardus

Publisher: Souvenir Press

ISBN: 9780285641020

Category:

Page: 254

View: 121

In this, another collection of classic cricket writing by Sir Neville Cardus, he urges that the game itself is more important than winning, players should fully express themselves in the game and he writes about those players who delight the senses: Hurst and Hutton, McCabe and Compton. There are essays on the Indians, West Indians and the 1948 Australians who Cardus considered the best team ever to visit England. An outstanding article describes an innings by Compton that he believed to be 'champagne for the connoisseur, ginger pop for the boys'.

The Summer Field A History of English Cricket Since 1840The Summer Field A History of English Cricket Since 1840



Cardus suited the reactionary Field, which in a June 1937 editorial deplored ever larger and thicker pads which ... Likewise Cardus that month complained: 'In the hands of many fine players a cricket bat is just an implement which is ...

Author: Mark Rowe

Publisher: Association of Cricket Statisticians and Historians

ISBN: 9781708165758

Category:

Page: 233

View: 140

Cricket has come a long way since players could only travel on foot, or by horse and cart. Some things never change; someone has to bat, someone bowl, someone be captain; everyone has to learn. The game is nothing without cricketers; yet the men (or women) on the field are never the full story, as The Summer Field shows. It includes spectators, journalists, ground-keepers, coaches, umpires, selectors and tea ladies. Nor is it only the story of the greatest players, such as Sydney Barnes and Herbert Sutcliffe; we meet also Will Richards, the Nottingham school-teacher; his friend George Wakerley, the job-hunting club professional; and Freeman Barnardo, of Eton and Cambridge. This history of cricket since the coming of the railways seeks to answer questions, such as: what was it like to play cricket in the past? Who played it, and why did they? And why are the English so obsessed with Australia?

The Changing Face of CricketThe Changing Face of Cricket



Mr Neville Cardus (whose work deserves a critical study) is here most illuminating, not as a subject but as object. He will ask: 'Why do we deny the art of a cricketer, and rank it lower than a vocalist's or a fiddler's?

Author: Dominic Malcolm

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317969310

Category:

Page: 469

View: 227

For cricket enthusiasts there is nothing to match the meaningful contests and excitement generated by the game’s subtle shifts in play. Conversely, huge swathes of the world’s population find cricket the most obscure and bafflingly impenetrable of sports. The Changing Face of Cricket attempts to account for this paradox. The Changing Face of Cricket provides an overview of the various ways in which social scientists have analyzed the game’s cultural impact. The book’s international analysis encompasses Australia, the Caribbean, England, India, Ireland, South Africa, Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe. Its interdisciplinary approach allies anthropology, history, literary criticism, political studies and sociology with contributions from cricket administrators and journalists. The collection addresses historical and contemporary issues such as gender equality, global sports development, the impact of cricket mega-events, and the growing influence of commercial and television interests culminating in the Twenty20 revolution. Whether one loves or hates the game, understands what turns square legs into fine legs, or how mid-offs become silly, The Changing Face of Cricket will enlighten the reader on the game’s cultural contours and social impact and prove to be the essential reader in cricket studies. This book was published as a special issue of Sport in Society.

Learie Constantine and Race Relations in Britain and the EmpireLearie Constantine and Race Relations in Britain and the Empire



Before the tour Ramadhin had played scarcely any 'first class' cricket. ... It was James who noted with displeasure that while Cardus the cricket writer could introduce musical allusions into his descriptions of play, Cardus the music ...

Author: Jeffrey Hill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350069848

Category:

Page: 240

View: 997

Who was Learie Constantine? And what can he tell us about the politics of race and race relations in 20th-century Britain and the Empire? Through examining the life, times and opinions of this Trinidadian cricketer-turned-politician, Learie Constantine and Race Relations in Britain and the Empire explores the centrality of race in British politics and society. Unlike conventional biographical studies of Constantine, this unique approach to his life, and the racially volatile context in which it was lived, moves away from the 'good man' narrative commonly attributed to his rise to pre-eminence as a spokesman against racial discrimination and as the first black peer in the House of Lords. Through detailing how Constantine's idea of 'assimilation' was criticized, then later rejected by successive activists in the politics of race, Jeff rey Hill off ers an alternative and more sophisticated analysis of Constantine's contributions to, and complex relationship with, the fight against racial inequalities inherent in British domestic and imperial society.