Babel and BabylonBabel and Babylon



In this book, the author approaches the question of spectatorship from the perspective of the public sphere, as a critical concept that is itself a category of historical transformation.

Author: Miriam HANSEN

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674058316

Category:

Page: 377

View: 685

Focusing on exemplary moments in the American silent era, Hansen explains how the concept of the spectator evolved as a crucial part of the classical Hollywood paradigm--as one of the new industry's strategies to integrate ethnically, socially, and sexually differentiated audiences in a modern culture of consumption.

Radicalism in American Silent Films 1909 1929Radicalism in American Silent Films 1909 1929



This work identifies 436 American silent films released between 1909 and 1929 that engaged the issues of militant labor and revolutionary radicalism.

Author: Michael Slade Shull

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476611037

Category:

Page: 355

View: 801

This work identifies 436 American silent films released between 1909 and 1929 that engaged the issues of militant labor and revolutionary radicalism. It begins with an extended introduction and analytical chapters that investigate the ways in which the American motion picture industry portrayed the interrelationships between labor radicals, exploitative capitalists, socialist idealists and Bolsheviks during this critical twenty-year period. Each entry contains a detailed plot synopsis, citations to primary sources, coding indicating the presence or absence of 14 predominant discernible biases (including anti- and pro-capitalism, socialism, revolution and labor), and subject coding keyed to 64 related terms and concepts (including agitators, Bolshevism, bombs, female radicals, militias, mobs, political refugees, and strikes). These statistical data included in the filmography are presented in a series of charts and are fully integrated into the historical-critical text. Total number and percentage statistics for the instances of these coded biases and traits are given per year, per era, and overall.

American Silent FilmAmerican Silent Film



This collection of 11 essays reveal the complexity of silent films and explore the era in which they were produced. The writers demonstrate that minorities and women responded to the times through film.

Author: Gregg Bachman

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: UOM:39015054453777

Category:

Page: 321

View: 217

This collection of 11 essays reveal the complexity of silent films and explore the era in which they were produced. The writers demonstrate that minorities and women responded to the times through film.

StillStill



Exploring the work of over sixty camera artists, Still recovers the stories of the photographers who descended on early Hollywood and the stars and starlets who sat for them between 1908 and 1928.

Author: David S. Shields

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226013435

Category:

Page: 416

View: 380

The success of movies like The Artist and Hugo recreated the wonder and magic of silent film for modern audiences, many of whom might never have experienced a movie without sound. But while the American silent movie was one of the most significant popular art forms of the modern age, it is also one that is largely lost to us, as more than eighty percent of silent films have disappeared, the victims of age, disaster, and neglect. We now know about many of these cinematic masterpieces only from the collections of still portraits and production photographs that were originally created for publicity and reference. Capturing the beauty, horror, and moodiness of silent motion pictures, these images are remarkable pieces of art in their own right. In the first history of still camera work generated by the American silent motion picture industry, David S. Shields chronicles the evolution of silent film aesthetics, glamour, and publicity, and provides unparalleled insight into this influential body of popular imagery. Exploring the work of over sixty camera artists, Still recovers the stories of the photographers who descended on early Hollywood and the stars and starlets who sat for them between 1908 and 1928. Focusing on the most culturally influential types of photographs—the performer portrait and the scene still—Shields follows photographers such as Albert Witzel and W. F. Seely as they devised the poses that newspapers and magazines would bring to Americans, who mimicked the sultry stares and dangerous glances of silent stars. He uncovers scene shots of unprecedented splendor—visions that would ignite the popular imagination. And he details how still photographs changed the film industry, whose growing preoccupation with artistry in imagery caused directors and stars to hire celebrated stage photographers and transformed cameramen into bankable names. Reproducing over one hundred and fifty of these gorgeous black-and-white photographs, Still brings to life an entire long-lost visual culture that a century later still has the power to enchant.

Guide to the Silent Years of American CinemaGuide to the Silent Years of American Cinema



Silent film's most complete reference guide, focusing on American actors, directors, and screenwriters, with an emphasis on the 1910's through the 1920s.

Author: Donald W. McCaffrey

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 0313303452

Category:

Page: 343

View: 776

Silent film's most complete reference guide, focusing on American actors, directors, and screenwriters, with an emphasis on the 1910's through the 1920s.

Silent Film the Triumph of the American MythSilent Film the Triumph of the American Myth



This broad cultural study connects the rise of film to the rise of America as a cultural centre and world power in the 20th century.

Author: Paula Marantz Cohen

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195140941

Category:

Page: 224

View: 834

This broad cultural study connects the rise of film to the rise of America as a cultural centre and world power in the 20th century. Cohen argues that through film, America asserted its cultural independence and forged a form of cultural oppression.

Struggles for RecognitionStruggles for Recognition



Analyzing sociocultural contexts through film, this book demonstrates the ways in which melodrama was mobilized for both liberal and illiberal ends, revealing or concealing social inequities from Buenos Aires to Bogotá to Los Angeles.

Author: Juan Sebastián Ospina León

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN: 9780520305434

Category:

Page: 266

View: 171

Struggles for Recognition traces the emergence of melodrama in Latin American silent film and silent film culture. Juan Sebastián Ospina León draws on extensive archival research to reveal how melodrama visualized and shaped the social arena of urban modernity in early twentieth-century Latin America. Analyzing sociocultural contexts through film, this book demonstrates the ways in which melodrama was mobilized for both liberal and illiberal ends, revealing or concealing social inequities from Buenos Aires to Bogotá to Los Angeles. Ospina León critically engages Euro-American and Latin American scholarship seldom put into dialogue, offering an innovative theorization of melodrama relevant to scholars working within and across different national contexts.

Silent TopicsSilent Topics



The two lengthiest essays discuss the release of British silent films in the United States and the contribution of gays and lesbians to American silent film.

Author: Anthony Slide

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 0810850168

Category:

Page: 129

View: 963

In Silent Topics, film historian Anthony Slide looks at various under-discussed and generally undocumented areas of silent film. The two lengthiest essays discuss the release of British silent films in the United States and the contribution of gays and lesbians to American silent film. Other essays examine the cost of silent film production, the "Great Events" series produced by Technicolor in the 1920s, and the manner in which early sheet music exploited silent film personalities. There are career essays on the screen's first special effects specialist, Roy Pomeroy, actor/minister Neal Dodd, and Margerie Bonner, the wife of novelist Malcolm Lowry. Silent Topics also includes the only known interview with the most prominent of silent film composers, David Mendoza, as well as a personal discussion on the lack of talent among a number of silent screen actors and actresses.

Silent Film and the Triumph of the American MythSilent Film and the Triumph of the American Myth



And rather than condemning the culture of celebrity and consumption that early Hollywood helped inspire, the book highlights the creative and democratic features of the silent-film ethos.

Author: Paula Marantz Cohen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195343883

Category:

Page: 234

View: 530

Silent Film and the Triumph of the American Myth connects the rise of film and the rise of America as a cultural center and twentieth-century world power. Silent film, Paula Cohen reveals, allowed America to sever its literary and linguistic ties to Europe and answer the call by nineteenth-century writers like Emerson, Thoreau and Whitman for an original form of expression compatible with American strengths and weaknesses. When film finally began to talk in 1927, the medium had already done its work. It had helped translate representation into a dynamic visual form and had "Americanized" the world. Cohen explores the way film emerged as an American medium through its synthesis of three basic elements: the body, the landscape, and the face. Nineteenth-century American culture had already charged these elements with meaning--the body through vaudeville and burlesque, landscape through landscape painting and moving panoramas, and the face through portrait photography. Integrating these popular forms, silent film also developed genres that showcased each of its basic elements: the body in comedy, the landscape in the western, and the face in melodrama. At the same time, it helped produce a new idea of character, embodied in the American movie star. Cohen's book offers a fascinating new perspective on American cultural history. It shows how nineteenth-century literature can be said to anticipate twentieth-century film--how Douglas Fairbanks was, in a sense, successor to Walt Whitman. And rather than condemning the culture of celebrity and consumption that early Hollywood helped inspire, the book highlights the creative and democratic features of the silent-film ethos. Just as notable, Cohen champions the concept of the "American myth" in the wake of recent attempts to discredit it. She maintains that American silent film helped consolidate and promote a myth of possibility and self-making that continues to dominate the public imagination and stands behind the best impulses of our contemporary world.

American Silent Film ComediesAmerican Silent Film Comedies



This illustrated compilation identifies people, studios, technical companies, and terms associated with silent film comedy from about 1890-1930.

Author: Blair Miller

Publisher: McFarland Publishing

ISBN: UOM:39015031757522

Category:

Page: 280

View: 619

This illustrated compilation identifies people, studios, technical companies, and terms associated with silent film comedy from about 1890-1930. More than 300 entries are biographical, including actors, studio and other corporate executives, directors and other technical personnel, inventors, etc. These sketches usually include birth and death dates and a summary of the contributions of the person to the genre; some entries include a photograph, selected filmography, and movie-magazine excerpts. For the more than 100 entries on studios and companies there is a brief history, emphasizing the firm's contribution to the development of silent film comedy. The third category of entries is quite a miscellany, including Blacks in Silent Film Comedies, Edison Kinetogram (a bulletin announcing new Edison films), Keystone Kops, Nickelodeons.

Navarro s Silent Film GuideNavarro s Silent Film Guide



Each of the entries includes title, year of release, director, and/or production company, cast list, and a synopsis. The volume totals 641 pages, with 587 pages of film entries, 40 pages of photographs, and an index of 38 pages.

Author: Dan Navarro

Publisher:

ISBN: 098292190X

Category:

Page: 642

View: 292

Navarro's Guide to Silent Films is an exhaustive directory listing every silent feature film (5 reels or more) produced in the United States, 9,000 titles in all! Each of the entries includes title, year of release, director, and/or production company, cast list, and a synopsis. The volume totals 641 pages, with 587 pages of film entries, 40 pages of photographs, and an index of 38 pages. Its target audience includes film buffs, students, and researchers. Chronicling the world of film before the appearance of talkies, the book includes every genre, including comedy, western, gangster, spectacle, and romance. It is organized alphabetically by film title, but also allows the reader to search by actor or director using the extensive index. The author's selection of film stills and publicity photos pays tribute to such classic films as D.W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (starring John Barrymore), and Cecil B. DeMille's Cleopatra. Publicity photos from the period include icons such as Lon Chaney, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Charles Farrell, Janet Gaynor, Dorothy Gish, Rudolph Valentino and Mary Pickford, among many others.

The Movies as a World ForceThe Movies as a World Force



The utopian and universalist view of cinema, the book shows, represents a synthesis of New Age spirituality and the new liberalism.

Author: Ryan Jay Friedman

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813593616

Category:

Page: 232

View: 447

Throughout the silent-feature era, American artists and intellectuals routinely described cinema as a force of global communion, a universal language promoting mutual understanding and harmonious coexistence amongst disparate groups of people. In the early 1920s, film-industry leaders began to espouse this utopian view, in order to claim for motion pictures an essentially uplifting social function. The Movies as a World Force examines the body of writing in which this understanding of cinema emerged and explores how it shaped particular silent films and their marketing campaigns. The utopian and universalist view of cinema, the book shows, represents a synthesis of New Age spirituality and the new liberalism. It provided a framework for the first official, written histories of American cinema and persisted as an advertising trope, even after the transition to sound made movies reliant on specific national languages.

A Guide to American Silent Crime FilmsA Guide to American Silent Crime Films



For the serious student of crime films, this work provides a comprehensive treatment of genre, but, most importantly, it revives an almost forgotten genre for generations of students and movie fans both old and new.

Author: Larry Langman

Publisher: Greenwood

ISBN: UOM:39015032431127

Category:

Page: 351

View: 131

The immense popularity of movies has its roots in the silent films of the early 1900s, this being especially true of the crime genre. This extensive guide features the entire history of the crime genre during the silent era, including more than 2,000 film entries, complete with names of directors, screenwriters, and major players, and offers a wealth of data supported by plot evaluations and occasional thematic commentaries. For the serious student of crime films, this work provides a comprehensive treatment of genre, but, most importantly, it revives an almost forgotten genre for generations of students and movie fans both old and new.

Working Class HollywoodWorking Class Hollywood



This path-breaking book reveals how Hollywood became "Hollywood" and what that meant for the politics of America and American film.

Author: Steven J. Ross

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691214641

Category:

Page:

View: 327

This path-breaking book reveals how Hollywood became "Hollywood" and what that meant for the politics of America and American film. Working-Class Hollywood tells the story of filmmaking in the first three decades of the twentieth century, a time when going to the movies could transform lives and when the cinema was a battleground for control of American consciousness. Steven Ross documents the rise of a working-class film movement that challenged the dominant political ideas of the day. Between 1907 and 1930, worker filmmakers repeatedly clashed with censors, movie industry leaders, and federal agencies over the kinds of images and subjects audiences would be allowed to see. The outcome of these battles was critical to our own times, for the victors got to shape the meaning of class in twentieth- century America. Surveying several hundred movies made by or about working men and women, Ross shows how filmmakers were far more concerned with class conflict during the silent era than at any subsequent time. Directors like Charlie Chaplin, D. W. Griffith, and William de Mille made movies that defended working people and chastised their enemies. Worker filmmakers went a step further and produced movies from A Martyr to His Cause (1911) to The Gastonia Textile Strike (1929) that depicted a unified working class using strikes, unions, and socialism to transform a nation. J. Edgar Hoover considered these class-conscious productions so dangerous that he assigned secret agents to spy on worker filmmakers. Liberal and radical films declined in the 1920s as an emerging Hollywood studio system, pressured by censors and Wall Street investors, pushed American film in increasingly conservative directions. Appealing to people's dreams of luxury and upward mobility, studios produced lavish fantasy films that shifted popular attention away from the problems of the workplace and toward the pleasures of the new consumer society. While worker filmmakers were trying to heighten class consciousness, Hollywood producers were suggesting that class no longer mattered. Working-Class Hollywood shows how silent films helped shape the modern belief that we are a classless nation.

Cecil B DeMille and American CultureCecil B DeMille and American Culture



In this innovative work, which integrates cultural history and cultural studies, Sumiko Higashi shows how DeMille artfully inserted cinema into genteel middle-class culture by replicating in his films such spectacles as elaborate parlor ...

Author: Sumiko Higashi

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520914813

Category:

Page: 264

View: 723

Cecil B. DeMille and American Culture demonstrates that the director, best remembered for his overblown biblical epics, was one of the most remarkable film pioneers of the Progressive Era. In this innovative work, which integrates cultural history and cultural studies, Sumiko Higashi shows how DeMille artfully inserted cinema into genteel middle-class culture by replicating in his films such spectacles as elaborate parlor games, stage melodramas, department store displays, Orientalist world's fairs, and civic pageantry. The director not only established his signature as a film author by articulating middle-class ideology across class and ethnic lines, but by the 1920's had become a trendsetter, with set and costume designs that influenced the advertising industry to create a consumer culture based on female desire. Drawing on a wealth of previously untapped material from the DeMille Archives and other collections, Higashi provides imaginative readings of DeMille's early feature films, viewing them in relation to the dynamics of social change, and she documents the extent to which the emergence of popular culture was linked to the genteel tradition.