A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big HornA Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn



In letters to his beloved wife, Fannie, and in diary entries—reproduced in this volume exactly as he wrote them—DeWolf describes the terrain, weather conditions, and medical needs that he and his companions encountered along the way.

Author: James Madison DeWolf

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806158129

Category:

Page: 288

View: 239

In spring 1876 a physician named James Madison DeWolf accepted the assignment of contract surgeon for the Seventh Cavalry, becoming one of three surgeons who accompanied Custer’s battalion at the Battle of the Little Big Horn. Killed in the early stages of the battle, he might easily have become a mere footnote in the many chronicles of this epic campaign—but he left behind an eyewitness account in his diary and correspondence. A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn is the first annotated edition of these rare accounts since 1958, and the most complete treatment to date. While researchers have known of DeWolf’s diary for many years, few details have surfaced about the man himself. In A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn, Todd E. Harburn bridges this gap, providing a detailed biography of DeWolf as well as extensive editorial insight into his writings. As one of the most highly educated men who traveled with Custer, the surgeon was well equipped to compose articulate descriptions of the 1876 campaign against the Indians, a fateful journey that began for him at Fort Lincoln, Dakota Territory, and ended on the battlefield in eastern Montana Territory. In letters to his beloved wife, Fannie, and in diary entries—reproduced in this volume exactly as he wrote them—DeWolf describes the terrain, weather conditions, and medical needs that he and his companions encountered along the way. After DeWolf’s death, his colleague Dr. Henry Porter, who survived the conflict, retrieved his diary and sent it to DeWolf’s widow. Later, the DeWolf family donated it to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. Now available in this accessible and fully annotated format, the diary, along with the DeWolf’s personal correspondence, serves as a unique primary resource for information about the Little Big Horn campaign and medical practices on the western frontier.

Deliverance from the Little Big HornDeliverance from the Little Big Horn



But the story of Dr. Porter’s wartime exploits goes far beyond the battle itself.

Author: Joan Nabseth Stevenson

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806187907

Category:

Page: 232

View: 646

Of the three surgeons who accompanied Custer’s Seventh Cavalry on June 25, 1876, only the youngest, twenty-eight-year-old Henry Porter, survived that day’s ordeal, riding through a gauntlet of Indian attackers and up the steep bluffs to Major Marcus Reno’s hilltop position. But the story of Dr. Porter’s wartime exploits goes far beyond the battle itself. In this compelling narrative of military endurance and medical ingenuity, Joan Nabseth Stevenson opens a new window on the Battle of the Little Big Horn by re-creating the desperate struggle for survival during the fight and in its wake. As Stevenson recounts in gripping detail, Porter’s life-saving work on the battlefield began immediately, as he assumed the care of nearly sixty soldiers and two Indian scouts, attending to wounds and performing surgeries and amputations. He evacuated the critically wounded soldiers on mules and hand litters, embarking on a hazardous trek of fifteen miles that required two river crossings, the scaling of a steep cliff, and a treacherous descent into the safety of the steamboat Far West, waiting at the mouth of the Little Big Horn River. There began a harrowing 700-mile journey along the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers to the post hospital at Fort Abraham Lincoln near Bismarck, Dakota Territory. With its new insights into the role and function of the army medical corps and the evolution of battlefield medicine, this unusual book will take its place both as a contribution to the history of the Great Sioux War and alongside such vivid historical novels as Son of the Morning Star and Little Big Man. It will also ensure that the selfless deeds of a lone “contract” surgeon—unrecognized to this day by the U.S. government—will never be forgotten.

Custer the Seventh Cavalry and the Little Big HornCuster the Seventh Cavalry and the Little Big Horn



... Surgeon at Little Big Horn” by Thomas R. Buecker regarding Dr. Holmes
Paulding. ———. Passing into Legend.' The Death of Custer. Intro. by Richard
Hardori'f. Brooklyn, NY: Arrow and Trooper (1991), illus., maps reprinted from The
 ...

Author: Mike O'Keefe

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806188140

Category:

Page: 944

View: 847

Since the shocking news first broke in 1876 of the Seventh Cavalry’s disastrous defeat at the Little Big Horn, fascination with the battle—and with Lieutenant George Armstrong Custer—has never ceased. Widespread interest in the subject has spawned a vast outpouring of literature, which only increases with time. This two-volume bibliography of Custer literature is the first to be published in some twenty-five years and the most complete ever assembled. Drawing on years of research, Michael O’Keefe has compiled entries for roughly 3,000 books and 7,000 articles and pamphlets. Covering both nonfiction and fiction (but not juvenile literature), the bibliography focuses on events beginning with Custer’s tenure at West Point during the 1850s and ending with the massacre at Wounded Knee in 1890. Included within this span are Custer’s experiences in the Civil War and in Texas, the 1873 Yellowstone and 1874 Black Hills expeditions, the Great Sioux War of 1876–77, and the Seventh Cavalry’s pursuit of the Nez Perces in 1877. The literature on Custer, the Battle of the Little Big Horn, and the Seventh Cavalry touches the entire American saga of exploration, conflict, and settlement in the West, including virtually all Plains Indian tribes, the frontier army, railroading, mining, and trading. Hence this bibliography will be a valuable resource for a broad audience of historians, librarians, collectors, and Custer enthusiasts.

They Died with CusterThey Died with Custer



Relying on historical sources, archaeological evidence, skeletal remains, and many illustrations, the authors investigate the lives of the cavalrymen who rode and died with General Custer and examine past and present views about how to ...

Author: Douglas D. Scott

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 0806135077

Category:

Page: 416

View: 530

Relying on historical sources, archaeological evidence, skeletal remains, and many illustrations, the authors investigate the lives of the cavalrymen who rode and died with General Custer and examine past and present views about how to memorialize their deaths. UP.

Archaeology History and Custer s Last BattleArchaeology History and Custer s Last Battle



The Little Big Horn Reexamined Richard A. Fox. 12. THE. CUSTER. HILL.
EPISODE. Q.How long didthe fightlaston [Custer Hill]? A.Just afew minutes. ...
eroded,slightly less than half the menwho had ridden into battle congregated at
theknoll bearing General Custer'sname. ... asdid, probably, Sgt.Robert Hughes
ofthe staff.7 Very likely, civilians with the battalion, and its surgeon, accompanied
thestaff.

Author: Richard A. Fox

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806148779

Category:

Page: 416

View: 650

On the afternoon of June 25, 1867, an overwhelming force of Sioux and Cheyenne Indians quickly mounted a savage onslaught against General George Armstrong Custer’s battalion, driving the doomed troopers of the U.S. Seventh Cavalry to a small hill overlooking the Little Bighorn River, where Custer and his men bravely erected their heroic last stand. So goes the myth of the Battle of the Little Bighorn, a myth perpetuated and reinforced for over 100 years. In truth, however, "Custer’s Last Stand" was neither the last of the fighting nor a stand. Using innovative and standard archaeological techniques, combined with historical documents and Indian eyewitness accounts, Richard Allan Fox, Jr. vividly replays this battle in astonishing detail. Through bullets, spent cartridges, and other material data, Fox identifies combat positions and tracks soldiers and Indians across the Battlefield. Guided by the history beneath our feet, and listening to the previously ignored Indian testimonies, Fox reveals scenes of panic and collapse and, ultimately, a story of the Custer battle quite different from the fatalistic versions of history. According to the author, the five companies of the Seventh Cavalry entered the fray in good order, following planned strategies and displaying tactical stability. It was the sudden disintegration of this cohesion that caused the troopers’ defeat. The end came quickly, unexpectedly, and largely amid terror and disarray. Archaeological evidences show that there was no determined fighting and little firearm resistance. The last soldiers to be killed had rushed from Custer Hill.

Little BighornLittle Bighorn



“You'll have Weir's company and Godfrey's, beside your own,” Custer said. ...
Custer turned in his saddle, pointed southwest, where, a mile away in the gin-
clear distance, a ridge swept up, gray-green, to meet the ... “Can I take a surgeon
?

Author: John Hough

Publisher: Skyhorse

ISBN: 9781629143231

Category:

Page: 320

View: 427

Little Bighorn is the beautifully written, uniquely American story of the coming-of-age of eighteen-year-old Allen Winslow during the Battle of the Little Bighorn and the fraught weeks immediately preceding it. The novel abounds with memorable characters, including Allen himself, his beautiful sixteen-year-old traveling companion, Addie, and the brave but monomaniacal Gen. George Armstrong Custer. Hough brings to life the American West and heartbreaking history, brilliantly portraying the flawed and tormented Custer. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade, Yucca, and Good Books imprints, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in fiction—novels, novellas, political and medical thrillers, comedy, satire, historical fiction, romance, erotic and love stories, mystery, classic literature, folklore and mythology, literary classics including Shakespeare, Dumas, Wilde, Cather, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

Peter Thompson s Narrative of the Little Bighorn Campaign 1876Peter Thompson s Narrative of the Little Bighorn Campaign 1876



A Critical Analysis of an Eyewitness Account of the Custer Debacle Peter
Thompson Daniel O. Magnussen ... Two doctors , both acting assistant surgeons ,
had accompanied Reno ' s battalion into the valley of the Little Bighorn , James M
 ...

Author: Peter Thompson

Publisher: Arthur H. Clark Company

ISBN: UOM:39015046419530

Category:

Page: 339

View: 504

A Report to the Surgeon General on the Transport of Sick and Wounded by Pack AnimalsA Report to the Surgeon General on the Transport of Sick and Wounded by Pack Animals



... Custer ' s command , in the Little Big Horn Valley , Montana Territory . Very
respectfully , your obedient servant , G . C . DOANE , 1st Lieut . 2d Cavalry . A few
weeks after tbese experiences in the command of General Terry , ? Surgeon B . A
 ...

Author: George Alexander Otis

Publisher:

ISBN: STANFORD:24503428765

Category:

Page: 32

View: 663

1876 Facts About Custer And The Battle Of The Little Big Horn1876 Facts About Custer And The Battle Of The Little Big Horn



"Custer's Last Lieutenant" was Charles Albert Varnum, whose Army career
spanned more than 50 years of our nation's history. Jay Kanitz noted ... The fact
that Custer did not send a surgeon with Benteen's column may have meant that
Custer ...

Author: Jerry Russell

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 1882810341

Category:

Page: 264

View: 411

This accessible paperback in the "Facts About" series covers all aspects of the famous campaign in surprising detail, with much hard-to-find information on the background of the participants, the Mexican viewpoint, and the continuing mystery of possible survivors.

Custer and the Little Big HornCuster and the Little Big Horn



In brief , Hancock ' s charges referred to Custer ' s absenting himself from his
command on personal business , but West ... attention from the Acting Assistant
Surgeon with his command or any other Medical or Surgical attendance
whatever ) .

Author: Charles K. Hofling

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015010445792

Category:

Page: 118

View: 979

In this book, Hofling turns his attention to the psychological context in which Custer operated in order to understand the decisions which produced his final disaster.

U S Army RegisterU S Army Register



Captain George S. Rose , Assistant Surgeon , at Madison Barracks , Sacket's
Harbor , N. Y. , November 20 , 1876 . ... Captain Myles W. Kengh , Seventh
Cavalry , killed June 25 , 1876 , in action with Sioux Indians , on Little Big Horn
River , M. T. Captain ... 1876 , in action with Sioux Indians , on Little Big Horn
River , M. T. Captain Thomas W. Custer , Seventh Cavalry , killed June 25 , 1876 ,
in action with ...

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: UCAL:B2985593

Category:

Page:

View: 458

The Strategy of Defeat at the Little Big HornThe Strategy of Defeat at the Little Big Horn



Listed on Amazon.com as Battles of the Little Bighorn: General Fry[i.e. Roe] on
the Custer battle, William E. Morris to ... recorded in pictographs and text at the
Cheyenne River Reservation, 1881, and told to Assistant Surgeon McChesney ...

Author: Frederic C. Wagner III

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476618814

Category:

Page: 296

View: 852

The battle that unfolded at the Little Big Horn River on June 25, 1876, marked a watershed in the history of the Plains Indians. While a stunning victory for the Sioux and Cheyenne peoples, it initiated a new and vigorous effort by the U.S. government to rid the west of marauding tribes and to realize the ideal of “Manifest Destiny.” While thousands of books and articles have covered different aspects of the battle, few if any have analyzed the tactics and chronology to arrive at a satisfactory explanation of what befell George Armstrong Custer and the 209 men who died alongside him. This volume seeks to explain the circumstances culminating in the near-destruction of the 7th Cavalry Regiment by a close examination of timing, setting every event to a specific moment based on accounts of the battle’s participants.

The Little Big Horn 1876The Little Big Horn 1876



Military Division of the Missouri ; The following just received : Custer with his
whole regiment & forty scouts and guides ... of the Cavalry Lieut Crittenden of the
Twentieth Infantry & Acting Ass't Surgeon DeWolf Lieut Harrington & Ass't
Surgeon ...

Author: Loyd J. Overfield

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803286015

Category:

Page: 203

View: 764

Noting that the documents pertaining to the Battle of the Little Big Horn are often garbled in editing and quoted out of context, Loyd J. Overfield set out to compile the original orders, letters, and telegrams that put a great fighting machine into motion and soon conveyed the shock of its destruction. Far more readable than today's official documents, they carry the sound of individual voices and clearly state the circumstances surrounding Custer's fall. The communications of this collection begin with Custer's successful plea to President Grant, who in a fit of pique had originally forbidden him to join his regiment in fighting the hostile Indians. A series of carefully spelled-out field orders is followed by a letter from Major Marcus Reno asking for medical aid for his wounded men after two days of fighting. Included are dispatches from Reno, Gen. Alfred H. Terry, Col. John Gibbon, Capt. Frederick Benteen, and Capt. E.W. Smith. The rosters of officers and enlisted men who fought at the Little Big Horn will be of interest to Custer buffs and historians and also to family genealogists trying to trace ancestors who made history there. Overfield has provided primary sources that amount to a detailed postmortem of events from participants only too aware that history would ask questions.

Dr Henry R PorterDr Henry R Porter



Drawing on his writings, this biography tells the story of Porter's transformation from young easterner to ambitious frontier settler and medical practicioner in mid-19th century America.

Author: L.G. Walker, Jr., M.D.

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786482412

Category:

Page: 231

View: 198

“Custer came to me and said: ‘Porter, there is a large camp of Indians ahead, and we are going to have a great killing.’” The words of army contract surgeon Henry R. Porter are chilling today in their matter-of-fact reference to the battle to come—a battle of which Porter would be one of the few white survivors. Drawing on his writings, this biography tells the story of Porter’s transformation from young easterner to ambitious frontier settler and medical practicioner in mid–19th century America. In its details of frontier life, of the infamous Battle of Little Bighorn, and of Porter’s later travels around the world (which ended with his death in Agra, India), the reader finds richness that brings history vividly to life. Appendices contain a list of items from the North Dakota Historical Society’s Henry R. Porter collection and a detailed Porter lineage.

Little BighornLittle Bighorn



Custer was reburied at West Point . His brother , Capt . Tom Custer ( recipient of
two Medals of Honor in the Civil War ) , was interred at Fort Leavenworth ,
Kansas , along with Captain George Yates and Lieutenants James Calhoun and
 ...

Author: Vincent A. Heier

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 0738570079

Category:

Page: 127

View: 142

The Battle of the Little Bighorn on June 25-26, 1876, is one of the most controversial and studied events in American history. While of relatively minor importance as military affair, the symbolic scene of "Custer's Last Stand" soon entered into the nation's public consciousness. First seen as the heroic sacrifice of Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer and the 7th Cavalry against the combined forces of the Lakota and Cheyenne in the further settlement of the West, it has emerged as another tragic chapter in the treatment of American Indians. The battlefield in present-day southeastern Montana remains a popular destination for tourists and scholars alike.

Wonderland 1898 Wonderland 1898



+ Doctor Porter . Scout Charlie Reynolds , killed in Reno ' s fight in river bottom . *
Killed with Custer , * * Killed during Reno ' s retreat . + Only one of three surgeons
who survived the battle of Little Big Horn . Resident of Bismarck , N . D . 8 .

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN: HARVARD:32044019353069

Category:

Page:

View: 668

Son of the Morning StarSon of the Morning Star



Custer and The Little Bighorn Evan S. Connell ... As for the other surgeon, Dr.
Porter, he managed to scramble out of the valley, and the first thing he said to
Reno on the hilltop was: “Major, the men were pretty well demoralized, weren't
they?

Author: Evan S. Connell

Publisher: North Point Press

ISBN: 9780374708733

Category:

Page: 448

View: 847

Custer's Last Stand is among the most enduring events in American history--more than one hundred years after the fact, books continue to be written and people continue to argue about even the most basic details surrounding the Little Bighorn. Evan S. Connell, whom Joyce Carol Oates has described as "one of our most interesting and intelligent American writers," wrote what continues to be the most reliable--and compulsively readable--account of the subject. Connell makes good use of his meticulous research and novelist's eye for the story and detail to re-vreate the heroism, foolishness, and savagery of this crucial chapter in the history of the West.

Hokahey A Good Day to Die Hokahey A Good Day to Die



Concise, well-written, and respectful of Cheyenne and Lakota cultural practices, this book is an essential contribution to our understanding of how the Cheyennes and Lakotas waged the Battle of the Little Big Horn.

Author: Richard G. Hardorff

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803273223

Category:

Page: 174

View: 499

Traditionally historians of the Little Big Horn fight have focused on Custer and his troops?on what they were doing and where they died. But as one Miniconjou warrior told a gathering at a 1926 commemoration of the battle, the Lakotas and Cheyennes also lost brave men. These men had died defending their homes and families, and they too deserved recognition.øHokahey! A Good Day to Die! details the final moments of each of the fallen Cheyenne and Lakota heroes. Richard G. Hardorff sifted through the many interviews with Indian survivors of the battle, cross-checking every story of a wounded or dead individual to ascertain who was killed, in which action, and by whom. He concludes that the Indian dead comprised thirty-one men, six women, and four children?astonishingly light losses when compared with the number of cavalry dead. Concise, well-written, and respectful of Cheyenne and Lakota cultural practices, this book is an essential contribution to our understanding of how the Cheyennes and Lakotas waged the Battle of the Little Big Horn.

History of Montana 1739 1885History of Montana 1739 1885



In order that scouts might be sent into the valley of the Little Big Horn , the cavalry
with the battery was then pushed on ... The scouts discovered three Indians , who
were at first supposed to be Sioux , but when overtaken they proved to be Crows ,
who had been with General Custer . ... 20th Infantry , Acting Assistant Surgeon
De Wolfe , Lieutenant Harrington , of the cavalry , and Assistant Surgeon Lord .

Author: Michael A. Leeson

Publisher:

ISBN: PRNC:32101079825855

Category:

Page: 1366

View: 657