A Dictionary of Japanese Buddhist TermsA Dictionary of Japanese Buddhist Terms



The return of a vital resource for students of Japanese culture, revised and expanded.

Author: Hisao Inagaki

Publisher:

ISBN: 1933330058

Category:

Page: 534

View: 626

Buddhism has permeated Japanese life and thought so deeply that knowledge of it is essential for a true understanding of any aspect of Japanese culture. This dictionary, with nearly five thousand entries on Buddhist terms, personal names, ceremonies, texts, and sects, will be of special interest to scholars and students of literature. Most entries have been drawn from such classics as Shasekishu Kokon chomonju, Hojoki, Makura no soshi, Tsurezure-gusa, Heike monogatari, and Taiheiki. Hisao Inagaki received a PhD from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and is a professor at Ryukoku University in Kyoto.

Dictionary of BuddhismDictionary of Buddhism



The Soka Gakkai Dictionary of Buddhism, a revised and expanded version of A Dictionary of Buddhist Terms and Concepts (1983), is a welcome addition that serves this purpose.

Author: Soka Gakkai

Publisher: Motilal Banarsidass

ISBN: 9788120833340

Category:

Page: 1000

View: 868

Anyone reading English translations of Buddhist texts will encounter a host of names, terms, and phrases whose meanings are not clear even though they appear in English. Buddhism is famous for its specialized terminology and translation alone may not communicate its full meaning. East Asian Buddhist diction is layered with several languages -Pali, Sanskrit, Chinese, and Japanese -and the only way to make one's way through this linguistic maze without getting lost is with the aid of a good dictionary. The Soka Gakkai Dictionary of Buddhism, a revised and expanded version of A Dictionary of Buddhist Terms and Concepts (1983), is a welcome addition that serves this purpose. Written clearly for the general reader, the Dictionary contains over 2,700 entries. While it is designed primarily for use with the Soka Gakkai's translations of Nichiren's works, the Dictionary contains a wealth of terms found in all other traditions of Buddhism. Definitions are given for technical terms, historical figures, doctrinal texts, institutions, and place names. The entries provide complete cross-references so that readers may know and further pursue meanings of term equivalents as rendered in other ways or languages. Ten appendixes provide maps and world lists that enable the reader to find terms in English, Pali, Sanskrit, Chinese, or Japanese. Like all Buddhist masters, Nichiren presented his particular message in the wider context of other Buddhist teachings and practices. To know the particular, one must also understand the general context, and the Dictionary, in addressing both levels, provides essential knowledge not only for students of Nichiren Buddhism but for anyone reading Buddhist texts.

Zen Brain ReflectionsZen Brain Reflections



Chapter 81 Words for the Inexpressible 1. H. Inagaki. A Dictionary of Japanese Buddhist Terms. Union City, CA, Heian International, 1988, 249.

Author: James H. Austin

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262260374

Category:

Page: 616

View: 702

A sequel to the popular Zen and the Brain further explores pivotal points of intersection in Zen Buddhism, neuroscience, and consciousness, arriving at a new synthesis of information from both neuroscience research and Zen studies. This sequel to the widely read Zen and the Brain continues James Austin's explorations into the key interrelationships between Zen Buddhism and brain research. In Zen-Brain Reflections, Austin, a clinical neurologist, researcher, and Zen practitioner, examines the evolving psychological processes and brain changes associated with the path of long-range meditative training. Austin draws not only on the latest neuroscience research and new neuroimaging studies but also on Zen literature and his personal experience with alternate states of consciousness. Zen-Brain Reflections takes up where the earlier book left off. It addresses such questions as: how do placebos and acupuncture change the brain? Can neuroimaging studies localize the sites where our notions of self arise? How can the latest brain imaging methods monitor meditators more effectively? How do long years of meditative training plus brief enlightened states produce pivotal transformations in the physiology of the brain? In many chapters testable hypotheses suggest ways to correlate normal brain functions and meditative training with the phenomena of extraordinary states of consciousness. After briefly introducing the topic of Zen and describing recent research into meditation, Austin reviews the latest studies on the amygdala, frontotemporal interactions, and paralimbic extensions of the limbic system. He then explores different states of consciousness, both the early superficial absorptions and the later, major "peak experiences." This discussion begins with the states called kensho and satori and includes a fresh analysis of their several different expressions of "oneness." He points beyond the still more advanced states toward that rare ongoing stage of enlightenment that is manifest as "sage wisdom." Finally, with reference to a delayed "moonlight" phase of kensho, Austin envisions novel links between migraines and metaphors, moonlight and mysticism. The Zen perspective on the self and consciousness is an ancient one. Readers will discover how relevant Zen is to the neurosciences, and how each field can illuminate the other.

The Princeton Dictionary of BuddhismThe Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism



With more than 5,000 entries totaling over a million words, this is the most comprehensive and authoritative dictionary of Buddhism ever produced in English.

Author: Robert E. Buswell Jr.

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691157863

Category:

Page: 1304

View: 954

With more than 5,000 entries totaling over a million words, this is the most comprehensive and authoritative dictionary of Buddhism ever produced in English. It is also the first to cover terms from all of the canonical Buddhist languages and traditions: Sanskrit, Pali, Tibetan, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. Unlike reference works that focus on a single Buddhist language or school, The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism bridges the major Buddhist traditions to provide encyclopedic coverage of the most important terms, concepts, texts, authors, deities, schools, monasteries, and geographical sites from across the history of Buddhism. The main entries offer both a brief definition and a substantial short essay on the broader meaning and significance of the term covered. Extensive cross-references allow readers to find related terms and concepts. An appendix of Buddhist lists (for example, the four noble truths and the thirty-two marks of the Buddha), a timeline, six maps, and two diagrams are also included. Written and edited by two of today's most eminent scholars of Buddhism, and more than a decade in the making, this landmark work is an essential reference for every student, scholar, or practitioner of Buddhism and for anyone else interested in Asian religion, history, or philosophy. The most comprehensive dictionary of Buddhism ever produced in English More than 5,000 entries totaling over a million words The first dictionary to cover terms from all of the canonical Buddhist languages and traditions--Sanskrit, Pali, Tibetan, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Detailed entries on the most important terms, concepts, texts, authors, deities, schools, monasteries, and geographical sites in the history of Buddhism Cross-references and appendixes that allow readers to find related terms and look up equivalent terms in multiple Buddhist languages Includes a list of Buddhist lists, a timeline, and maps Also contains selected terms and names in Thai, Burmese, Vietnamese, Lao, Khmer, Sinhalese, Newar, and Mongolian

Japan and ChristianityJapan and Christianity



Diligent practice; effort; practice of the Buddhist way (Inagaki, A Dictionary of Japanese Buddhist Terms). An illusory thought; a wanton thought; ...

Author: John Breen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781349243600

Category:

Page: 189

View: 549

Much has been written of the 'success' of the early missions to Japan during the decades immediately following the arrival of the first Jesuits in 1549. The subsequent 'failure' of the faith to put down roots strong enough to survive this initial wave of enthusiasm is discussed with equal alacrity. The papers in this volume, born of a Conference marking the centenary of the Japan Society of London, represent an attempt to reassess the contact between Christianity and Japan in terms of a symbiotic relationship, a dialogue in which the impact of Japan on the imported religion is viewed alongside the more frequently cited influence of Christianity on Japanese society. Here is a dynamic cultural encounter, examined by the papers in this volume from a series of political, literary and historical perspectives.

A Dictionary of Chinese Buddhist TermsA Dictionary of Chinese Buddhist Terms



17 ## Āvenikadharma , or buddhadharma , the eighteen different ... T1 The eighteen Japanese Buddhist sects , i.e.三論;法相;華嚴;律;俱舍;成實; * ; ; ; # t .

Author:

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 0700714553

Category:

Page: 510

View: 667

This invaluable interpretive tool, first published in 1937, is now available for the first time in a paperback edition specially aimed at students of Chinese Buddhism. Those who have endeavoured to read Chinese texts apart from the apprehension of a Sanskrit background have generally made a fallacious interpretation, for the Buddhist canon is basically translation, or analogous to translation. In consequence, a large number of terms existing are employed approximately to connote imported ideas, as the various Chinese translators understood those ideas. Various translators invented different terms; and, even when the same term was finally adopted, its connotation varied, sometimes widely, from the Chinese term of phrase as normally used by the Chinese. For instance, klésa undoubtedly has a meaning in Sanskrit similar to that of, i.e. affliction, distress, trouble. In Buddhism affliction (or, as it may be understood from Chinese, the afflicters, distressers, troublers) means passions and illusions; and consequently fan-nao in Buddhist phraseology has acquired this technical connotation of the passions and illusions. Many terms of a similar character are noted in the body of this work. Consequent partly on this use of ordinary terms, even a well-educated Chinese without a knowledge of the technical equivalents finds himself unable to understand their implications.

A Dictionary of Chinese Buddhist TermsA Dictionary of Chinese Buddhist Terms



不共法 Āveņikadharma , or buddhadharma , the eighteen different ... 1 The eighteen Japanese Buddhist sects , i.e.三論;法相;華嚴;律;俱舍;成實;天台;真言; ...

Author: William Edward Soothill

Publisher: Motilal Banarsidass Publ.

ISBN: 8120803191

Category:

Page: 510

View: 834

Here is an outstanding work for which two eminent scholars of Chinese Buddhism separated by 2000 miles of ocean collaborated for complete ten years during which the manuscript crossed the Atlantic four times. The authors aim has been to provide a key for the student with which to unlock a closed door and which does serve to reveal the riches of the great Buddhist thesaurus in China. In the absence of a dictionary of Chinese Buddhist Terms it was small wonder that the translation of Chinese texts has made little progress important thought these are to the understanding of Mahayana buddhism especially in its Far Eastern development.

The Dao Companion to Japanese Buddhist PhilosophyThe Dao Companion to Japanese Buddhist Philosophy



This has been a great contribution to the advancement of Buddhist studies in Japan. Each dictionary, glossary, or index has many stories to tell behind its ...

Author: Gereon Kopf

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9789048129249

Category:

Page: 749

View: 557

The volume introduces the central themes in and the main figures of Japanese Buddhist philosophy. It will have two sections, one that discusses general topics relevant to Japanese Buddhist philosophy and one that reads the work of the main Japanese Buddhist philosophers in the context of comparative philosophy. It combines basic information with cutting edge scholarship considering recent publications in Japanese, Chinese, English, and other European languages. As such, it will be an invaluable tool for professors teaching courses in Asian and global philosophy, undergraduate and graduate students, as well as the people generally interested in philosophy and/or Buddhism.

Presenting Japanese Buddhism to the WestPresenting Japanese Buddhism to the West



With the aid of a dictionary of Buddhist terms to decipher it, the paper appears as a desperate attempt to convey a great deal of doctrine.

Author: Judith Snodgrass

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807854581

Category:

Page: 351

View: 908

Japanese Buddhism was introduced to the West during the World's Parliament of Religions, in the 1893 Columbian Exposition. In describing and analysing this event, this text challenges the view of Orientalism as a one-way process by which Asian cultures are understood through Western ideas.

Language in the Buddhist Tantra of JapanLanguage in the Buddhist Tantra of Japan



17 Inagaki Hisao, A Dictionary of Japanese Buddhist Terms (Kyoto: Nagata Bunshodo, 1984), s.v. “Goji Monjuju.” For additional information, see Hatta Yukio, ...

Author: Richard K. Payne

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350037281

Category:

Page: 256

View: 521

Language in the Buddhist Tantra of Japan dismantles the preconception that Buddhism is a religion of mystical silence, arguing that language is in fact central to the Buddhist tradition. By examining the use of 'extraordinary language'-evocations calling on the power of the Buddha-in Japanese Buddhist Tantra, Richard K. Payne shows that such language was not simply cultural baggage carried by Buddhist practitioners from South to East Asia. Rather, such language was a key element in the propagation of new forms of belief and practice. In contrast to Western approaches to the philosophy of language, which are grounded in viewing language as a form of communication, this book argues that it is the Indian and East Asian philosophies of language that shed light on the use of language in meditative and ritual practices in Japan. It also illuminates why language was conceived as an effective means of progress on the path from delusion to awakening.

Theatricalities of PowerTheatricalities of Power



and a Buddhist divinity or absolute reality ( Nakamura et al . , eds . ... 813 ; Inagaki , ed . , A Dictionary of Japanese Buddhist Terms , 363 ) . 31.

Author: Steven T. Brown

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804740704

Category:

Page: 209

View: 576

Through an extended reading of the noh play Aoi ne Ue, as well as briefer examinations of several other plays, this book sheds new light on the circulation of power and desire in the middle and late medieval periods in Japan. It argues that these plays constituted an active force in the theater of the medieval cultural imaginary by engaging specific sociopolitical issues and problems.

The Shambhala Dictionary of Buddhism and ZenThe Shambhala Dictionary of Buddhism and Zen



The lives and teachings of important philosophers and meditation masters, the variety of practices, the basic texts and scriptures, and the range of sects and schools of thought are among the subjects covered.

Author: Ingrid Fischer-Schreiber

Publisher: Shambhala Publications

ISBN: 0877735204

Category:

Page: 280

View: 306

With over fifteen hundred entries and forty-six illustrations, The Shambhala Dictionary of Buddhism and Zen is the most complete compact reference work of its kind available in the English language. It is designed not only for students and meditators but also as a took to help familiarize all readers with Buddhist terms and concepts—such as chakra, karma, koan, nirvana, and tantra—that are encountered with increasing regularity in the literature of a wide range of fields today. The lives and teachings of important philosophers and meditation masters, the variety of practices, the basic texts and scriptures, and the range of sects and schools of thought are among the subjects covered. Pronunciation tables, a comprehensive bibliography, and a Ch'an/Zen lineage chart are also provided.