HokusaiHokusai



An exquisite objet d'art, this volume is the perfect vehicle for appreciating Hokusai's crowning achievement in all its lasting and subtle beauty.

Author: Prestel Publishing

Publisher: Prestel Publishing

ISBN: 3791386077

Category:

Page: 186

View: 638

Hokusai's beloved series of woodblock prints is now available in a stunning new format that honors the Japanese bookmaking tradition and illuminates the artist's radiant colors and exquisite lines. Hokusai's series depicting Mount Fuji is considered the pinnacle of his career. This beautiful boxed accordion-fold edition comprises the full set of forty-six prints (the original thirty-six and ten more that were completed later) and features a traditional silk binding along with a separate explanatory booklet. The book and booklet are packaged in an elegant slipcase. Devoted entirely to landscapes, Hokusai's series shows Mount Fuji from various viewpoints, framed in different ways. An indefatigable traveler who was passionate about nature, Hokusai explored every vantage point and season at the volcano. He presented it both as a solitary and majestic snow-capped peak and as a smaller object on a distant horizon. Hokusai also portrayed the mountain as an element in Japanese daily life and as an imposing force of nature that can be peaceful and beneficent, or ferocious and unforgiving. Extremely popular in their time, these prints had a profound impact on the development of 19th-century European painters such as Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, and Vincent van Gogh. These impeccably reproduced prints invite readers to examine Hokusai's virtuosic use of color and composition, his talent for contrasting perspectives, and his interest in the dueling roles of man and nature. An exquisite objet d'art, this volume is the perfect vehicle for appreciating Hokusai's crowning achievement in all its lasting and subtle beauty.

Views of Mt FujiViews of Mt Fuji



This edition presents a full-color reprint of that enduring masterpiece, plus the artist's later black-and-white series, One Hundred Views of Mt. Fuji. A must for all lovers of Japanese art.

Author: Katsushika Hokusai

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 9780486497587

Category:

Page: 250

View: 264

Kasushika Hokusai was among the foremost ukiyo-e artists of his generation, and his Thirty-six Views of Mt. Fuji ranks among the best-known series of Japanese woodblock prints. This edition presents a full-color reprint of that enduring masterpiece, plus the artist's later black-and-white series, One Hundred Views of Mt. Fuji. A must for all lovers of Japanese art.

3636



We consider Japan our spirit place and are always yearning to come back and go deeper in our exploration of the people and the landscape. This new work moved us out of the city of Tokyo and into the countryside.

Author: Formento & Formento

Publisher:

ISBN: 1733274103

Category:

Page:

View: 244

In winter of 2018 we returned to Japan but this time focused on channeling the artist Hokusai and asked the question of what Mt. Fuji means to us. We consider Japan our spirit place and are always yearning to come back and go deeper in our exploration of the people and the landscape. This new work moved us out of the city of Tokyo and into the countryside. We wanted to live under the ever changing appearance of Mt. Fuji and experience its burning energy. Creating an ambiguous narrative with our women as they played out an imagined life under the strength of the mountain and beyond the edge of the frame.

Hiroshige 36 Views of Mt Fuji 1852Hiroshige 36 Views of Mt Fuji 1852



Utagawa Hiroshige's two Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, 1852 and 1858 are both a copy act and in themselves innovative artistic endeavors.

Author: Cristina Berna

Publisher:

ISBN: 1637526547

Category:

Page: 110

View: 742

Utagawa Hiroshige's two Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, 1852 and 1858 are both a copy act and in themselves innovative artistic endeavors. Katsushika Hokusai published his famous series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji in 1830-1832 and it influenced Hiroshige tremendously to his own series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series 1852 which we deal with here. It is in the same horizontal format for landscapes that Hokusai used. In a subsequent series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji published in 1858 Hiroshige shifted to the vertical portrait format with novel and interesting results. We deal with that in a separate volume. It is possible to travel to see the same sites today and enjoy the views of Mt Fuji, which is still very important to the Japanese. Utagawa Hiroshige (in Japanese: 歌川広重), also called Andō Hiroshige (in Japanese: 安藤広重;), was a Japanese ukiyo-e artist, considered the last great master of that tradition. He was born 1797 and died 12 October 1858. Ukiyo-e is a genre of Japanese art which flourished from the 17th through 19th centuries. Its artists produced woodblock prints and paintings of such subjects as female beauties; kabuki actors and sumo wrestlers; scenes from history and folk tales; travel scenes and landscapes; flora and fauna; and erotica. The term ukiyo-e (浮世絵) translates as "picture[s] of the floating world". Hiroshige is best known for his horizontal-format landscape series The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō, and for his vertical-format landscape series One Hundred Famous Views of Edo and for instance the 69 Stations of the Nakasendō. The main subjects of his work are considered atypical of the ukiyo-e genre, whose focus was more on beautiful women, popular actors, and other scenes of the urban pleasure districts of Japan's Edo period (1603-1868).

Hiroshige 36 Views of Mt Fuji 1858Hiroshige 36 Views of Mt Fuji 1858



Utagawa Hiroshige's two Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, 1852 and 1858 are both a copy copy act and in themselves innovative artistic endeavors.

Author: Eric Thomsen

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN: 1071112104

Category:

Page: 108

View: 514

Utagawa Hiroshige's two Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, 1852 and 1858 are both a copy copy act and in themselves innovative artistic endeavors. Katsushika Hokusai published his famous series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji in 1830-1832 and it influenced Hiroshige tremendously to his own series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series 1852 which we deal with here.It is in the same horizontal format for landscapes that Hokusai used. In a subsequent series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji published in 1858 Hiroshige shifted to the vertical portrait format with novel and interesting results. We will deal with that in a separate volume.It is possible to travel to see the same sites today and enjoy the views of Mt Fuji, which are still very important to the Japanese.

36 Views of Mount Fuji36 Views of Mount Fuji



In an afterword new to this edition, Davidson tells of a poignant trip back to Japan in 2005 to visit friends who had remade their lives after the Great Hanshin Earthquake of 1995, which had devastated the city of Kobe, as well as the small ...

Author: Cathy N. Davidson

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822388180

Category:

Page: 272

View: 661

In 1980 Cathy N. Davidson traveled to Japan to teach English at a leading all-women’s university. It was the first of many journeys and the beginning of a deep and abiding fascination. In this extraordinary book, Davidson depicts a series of intimate moments and small epiphanies that together make up a panoramic view of Japan. With wit, candor, and a lover’s keen eye, she tells captivating stories—from that of a Buddhist funeral laden with ritual to an exhilarating evening spent touring the “Floating World,” the sensual demimonde in which salaryman meets geisha and the normal rules are suspended. On a remote island inhabited by one of the last matriarchal societies in the world, a disconcertingly down-to-earth priestess leads her to the heart of a sacred grove. And she spends a few unforgettable weeks in a quasi-Victorian residence called the Practice House, where, until recently, Japanese women were taught American customs so that they would make proper wives for husbands who might be stationed abroad. In an afterword new to this edition, Davidson tells of a poignant trip back to Japan in 2005 to visit friends who had remade their lives after the Great Hanshin Earthquake of 1995, which had devastated the city of Kobe, as well as the small town where Davidson had lived and the university where she taught. 36 Views of Mount Fuji not only transforms our image of Japan, it offers a stirring look at the very nature of culture and identity. Often funny, sometimes liltingly sad, it is as intimate and irresistible as a long-awaited letter from a good friend.

Hokusai s 36 Views of Mount FujiHokusai s 36 Views of Mount Fuji



Hokusai's 36 Views of Mount FujiFugaku SanjurokkeiI've long been a fan of Hokusai, and love the 36 Views of Mount Fuji series, so I put this little book together for myself with images of the prints in the series that I have collected over ...

Author: Patrick McDermott

Publisher:

ISBN: 1456491792

Category:

Page: 58

View: 396

Hokusai's 36 Views of Mount FujiFugaku SanjurokkeiI've long been a fan of Hokusai, and love the 36 Views of Mount Fuji series, so I put this little book together for myself with images of the prints in the series that I have collected over the years from various public sources. It turned out so well, I thought others might find it useful, so I decided to make it available to others using the amazing technology available today.This book simply contains a small (about 4" x 6") full-color copy of each of the 46 prints (sic: 36 Views has 46 views in it) in the series 36 Views of Mount Fuji. I use the book as a reference and reminder. There is no commentary or discussion, just the pictures, with the name in English & Japanese (romaji & kanji).I've indexed each picture with keywords, so if I want to find one with a ferry boat, the ones with snow, the one with the little turtle, or the salt gatherers, I can find them in the index.If you are interested in Hokusai's work, you might find this book as useful as I have.

Hiroshige 36 Views of Mt Fuji 1852Hiroshige 36 Views of Mt Fuji 1852



Utagawa Hiroshige's two Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, 1852 and 1858 are both a copy act and in innovative artistic endeavors.

Author: Cristina Berna

Publisher:

ISBN: 1647863759

Category:

Page: 110

View: 882

Utagawa Hiroshige's two Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, 1852 and 1858 are both a copy act and in themselves innovative artistic endeavors. Katsushika Hokusai published his famous series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji in 1830-1832 and it influenced Hiroshige tremendously to his own series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series 1852 which we deal with here. It is in the same horizontal format for landscapes that Hokusai used. In a subsequent series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji published in 1858 Hiroshige shifted to the vertical portrait format with novel and interesting results. We deal with that in a separate volume. It is possible to travel to see the same sites today and enjoy the views of Mt Fuji, which are still very important to the Japanese.

Hiroshige 36 Views of Mt Fuji 1858Hiroshige 36 Views of Mt Fuji 1858



Utagawa Hiroshige's two Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, 1852 and 1858, are both a copy act and innovative artistic endeavors.

Author: Cristina Berna

Publisher:

ISBN: 1647863767

Category:

Page: 112

View: 223

Utagawa Hiroshige's two Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, 1852 and 1858, are both a copy act and innovative artistic endeavors. Katsushika Hokusai published his famous series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji in 1830-1832 and influenced Hiroshige to do his own Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series 1852, and 1858 which we deal with here.

Hiroshige 36 Views of Mt Fuji 1852Hiroshige 36 Views of Mt Fuji 1852



Utagawa Hiroshige's two Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, 1852 and 1858 are both a copy act and innovative artistic endeavors.

Author: Cristina Berna

Publisher:

ISBN: 1956215220

Category:

Page:

View: 296

Utagawa Hiroshige's two Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, 1852 and 1858 are both a copy act and innovative artistic endeavors. Katsushika Hokusai published his famous series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji in 1830-1832 and it influenced Hiroshige to do first his own 1852 series ofThirty-six Views of Mount Fuji .

Hiroshige 36 Views of Mt Fuji 1858Hiroshige 36 Views of Mt Fuji 1858



Utagawa Hiroshige's two Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, 1852 and 1858, are both a copy act and innovative artistic endeavors.

Author: Cristina Berna

Publisher:

ISBN: 1647862701

Category:

Page: 108

View: 216

Utagawa Hiroshige's two Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series, 1852 and 1858, are both a copy act and innovative artistic endeavors. Katsushika Hokusai published his famous series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji in 1830-1832 and influenced Hiroshige to do his own Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji series 1852, and 1858 which we deal with here. Premium

HokusaiHokusai



Hokusai was not only a truly great artist.He also sent a message to common people, who could afford to buy his low cost prints.He conveyed the beauty of majesty, the mount Fujijama, in life.

Author: Eric Thomsen

Publisher:

ISBN: 1980594473

Category:

Page: 186

View: 415

Hokusai was not only a truly great artist.He also sent a message to common people, who could afford to buy his low cost prints.He conveyed the beauty of majesty, the mount Fujijama, in life. He conveyed the beauty of scenery - he said to people - look around you and see and enjoy the beauty of the scenery.He conveyed the beauty of a good human life - the craftmanship in making the timber, building the boat, fishing, growing tea, enjoying tea with the scenery.

Die 36 Ansichten des M nchner Olympiaturms The 36 Views of the Olympic Tower MunichDie 36 Ansichten des M nchner Olympiaturms The 36 Views of the Olympic Tower Munich



... new bridges: The 36 Views of the Olympic Tower in japonesque paintings: „In 36 Views of the Olympic Tower EMKA takes up in a japonesque style the manner of series of Japanese woodblock printings like the 36 Views of Mount Fuji.

Author: EMKA

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9783844847215

Category:

Page: 60

View: 344

Als der Olympiaturm 40 und München 850 Jahre alt wurden und die Olympischen Sommerspiele in München sich bald zum 40. mal jährten war es Zeit für Geschenke. Das Motto der 850-Jahr-Feier war "Brücken bauen" und das Geburtstagskind, der Olympiaturm, das ideale Motiv: Als Funkturm eine technische Brücke, ein Symbol für Pressefreiheit während der Olympiade, Teil der Partnerschaft von München mit Sapporo - damals Austragungsort der Olympischen Winterspiele - und schließlich Zeuge internationaler Sportveranstaltungen, multikultureller Events und Ausflugsziel zahlreicher Münchner und Touristen zugleich. Fasziniert von den japanischen Holzschnitten - besonders den Serien von Hokusai und Hiroshige - und um die Brücke nach Japan zu stärken, zeigt EMKA im japonistischen Stil den Olympiaturm in der Serie "die 36 Ansichten des Münchner Olympiaturms", angelehnt an "die 36 Ansichten des Fuji". Dabei ist der Olympiaturm Gast in Szenen des Alltags, Teil von Landschaften oder Mittelpunkt von Portraits. EMKA zeigt in seinen Bildern keinen bestimmten Moment sondern allgemeingültige Aufnahmen: "Es könnte heute oder gestern gewesen sein. Vielleicht auch erst morgen. Oder war es gar nicht so? Aber es könnte so gewesen sein." EMKA setzt nicht auf die naturgetreue Wiedergabe sondern zeigt Wesen und Atmosphäre der Subjekte. Das Bild setzt sich erst beim Betrachter vollständig zusammen. Die Bilder entstanden mit Sprühlack und Schablonen, in exzentrischen Farben, nicht weil sie schrill sind, sondern einfach anders. Eine Technik, die besonders mit der Renaissance von Street Art wieder hochmodern wurde. Dabei setzt EMKA auf eine Technik, die zwar die Bilder vergleichbar den Holzschnitten reproduzierbar macht, aber besonders in diesem Fall doch Unikate schafft. As the Olympic Tower was getting 40 and Munich 850 years old and soon there had to be celebrated the 40 years of the Olympic Games in Munich, it was time to give presents. The concept oft he festivities was "building bridges" and the felicitator, the Olympic Tower, was the ideal subject: A building integrated in the Olympic Park as a symbol for optimism and freedom of press and symbol fort he partnership between Munich and Saporo – the venue of the Olympic Winter Games the same year. In the meanwhile, the Olympic Park has developed to one of the largest centres for recreation and events of Europe and became a melting point of diverse cultures and people. Fascinated by Japanese wooden prints - especially by the landscape series of Hokusai and Hiroshige - and to strenghten the bridge to Japan, EMKA shows the Olympic Tower in a japonistic manner in the series "The 36 Views of the Olympic Tower", as a reference to "The 36 Views of Mount Fuji". The Olympic Tower shows up like a guest, the all day companion on our way through Munich’s urban districts, scenes of everyday live, landscapes and portraits around and with the distinctive mark of an open city. EMKA doesn’t tell snapshots or short stories, the paintings show a period of time, an epoch: "It could have been today or yesterday. Probably tomorrow. Or has it been different? But it could have been like this." Instead of a detailed and true-to-life reproduction EMKA displays the character and the atmosphere of the subjects. The painting is finaly set together in the mind oft he observer. EMKA used spray paint and stencils, with eccentric colours, not because they are shrill, but because they were different. A technique that had its renaissance in 2008 as street art became modern. This way EMKA used a method with the intention to assure reproducibility, as wooden prints were alike, but differ during the reproduction of the single works, and especially in this case remain unique.

The Thirty six Views of Mount FujiThe Thirty six Views of Mount Fuji



The expression “ 36 people ” was often used to mean all of the known poets of that age , and it may well be that Hokusai and his publisher intended “ 36 views ” to mean all possible views of Mount Fuji . In any event , the publishing ...

Author: Hokusai Katsushika

Publisher:

ISBN: UOM:39015034676232

Category:

Page: 18

View: 628

"Last year the East-West Center Press had the pleasure of publishing Hiroshige's The Fifty-three Stages of the Tokaido. That volume was so well received that this year the Press presents this companion volume of forty-six prints by Hokusai. By creating the landscape print, Hokusai breathed new life into the art. He became one of the greatest innovators of that field. Hokusai and Hiroshige are ranked among Japan's gifted and certainly most popular artists, and both made their marks with sets of prints depicting the Japanese landscape. Hokusai chose Mount Fuji as his theme, and Hiroshige chose the famous Tokaido. The volumes reproducing these two beautiful sets of woodblock prints comprise the highest achievement of the art of ukiyo-e. They are available separately or as a set, handsomely boxed. The historian or student of art will find them not only valuable to own, but also a sheer delight to read." -- Publisher's description

Beyond the Great WaveBeyond the Great Wave



Of course , Hokusai did the Eight Views of Lake Biwa , but he also did series such as the Six Jewel Rivers , the Chûshingura ( II or 12 ) , and Eight Views of Edo . The Thirty - Six Views of Mount Fuji proved to be so popular that there ...

Author: James King

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 3034303173

Category:

Page: 232

View: 736

The Japanese landscape print has had a tremendous influence on Western art of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In Japan and in the West it is often seen as the dominant form in Ukiyo-e, pictures from the floating world. And yet for all its importance, it is a genre whose history has never been written. Beyond The Great Wave is a survey or overview for all those interested in discovering the inner dynamics of one of art history's most remarkable achievements. However, it is also a quest narrative, in which landscapes and notions of Japan as a homeland are intertwined and interconnected. Although there has never been a book-length study of the Japanese landscape print in either Japanese or English, a great deal has been written about the two giants of the genre, Hokusai and Hiroshige. From what traditions did these two nineteenth-century artists emerge? Who were their predecessors? What influence, if any, did they have on other Ukiyo-e artists? Can their influence be seen in the shin-hanga and sôsaku-hanga artists of the twentieth century? This book addresses these issues, but it also looks at a number of other factors, such as the growth of tourism in nineteenth-century Japan, necessary for understanding this genre.

Hiroshige Famous Views of the Sixty Odd ProvincesHiroshige Famous Views of the Sixty Odd Provinces



Hiroshige pioneered a vertical format with the Famous Views of the Sixty-odd Provinces, and this was a departure from the horizontal format that Hokusai used in his famous 36 Views of Mt Fuji.

Author: Eric Thomsen

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN: 1098571916

Category:

Page: 190

View: 146

Hiroshige pioneered a vertical format with the Famous Views of the Sixty-odd Provinces, and this was a departure from the horizontal format that Hokusai used in his famous 36 Views of Mt Fuji. IntroductionWhat was Japan like in 1853, when this portrait was started by Utagawa Hiroshige with one print from each of the 69 provinces. It is an outstanding picture book from just before photography.Hiroshige travelled the Tōkaidō road to participate in an important procession in Kyoto in 1832 and published his 53 Stations of the Tōkaidō which was the most popular print series ever made in Japan, see the author's ISBN 9782919787647. It was even more popular than Hokusai's series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji, which had been recently published and which had influenced Hiroshige tremendously (ISBN 9782919787159 as hard cover).The Famous Views from the Sixty-Odd Provinces contains some of Hiroshige's most beloved prints and he again uses the horizontal format he pioneered for landscape paintings.